Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,716 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 15% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The Good Wife: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Drawn Together: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1301
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1301
1,301 tv reviews
  1. Six hours of raucous laughter, bone-rattling suspense, and god-awful tragedy. ... The Corner is a marvel of craft.
  2. By the end, it's unclear which of these people are alive or dead, literally or spiritually. But The Returned still qualifies as a new zombie classic--a haunting tribute to the lost loves who feed on your brain forever.
  3. Each season of this anthology drama tells a new story with a new cast, but McConaughey and Harrelson are so good, you immediately begin grieving the prospect of getting only eight episodes with them. [10 Jan 2013, p.67]
  4. You won't want to watch this, Yes, it will wreck you. But you'll be grateful you let it. [8 Nov 2013, p.61]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  5. A delicious deep dive into six Stephen Sondheim songs.
  6. Hannibal captures your imagination with the prospect of Graham using his imagination to figure a way out. [28 Feb 2014, p.65]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  7. It sounds heavy, yet the premiere is as buoyant as it is deep, light as it is layered. It is many things at once, including absolutely fantastic.
  8. A sprawl of engrossing setup. [4 Apr 2014, p.61]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  9. Its main purpose is to confront the taboo, and whether that means exploring just how far Louie will go into the "experimental" side of masturbation in the season premiere or simply digging into his ugliest prejudices about overweight women, the show can be revelatory.
  10. Orange Is the New Black might be the closest thing we have to Charles Dickens right now: a sharp denunciation of an arcane system, driven by hardscrabble characters with whimsical names that define who they are and what they like.
  11. It's an engrossing meditation on the complexities of redemption.
  12. How to Get Away With Murder begins with an actual murder--a group of hypercompetitive law students are fighting over what to do with the body--before it flashes back to their first day in Keating's class, quickly establishing each character before discrediting our first impressions.... Thanks to Davis' powerfully layered performance, it's impossible to read Keating.
  13. Burns' illuminating series turns the Roosevelt clan into a colorful Wes Anderson movie, albeit one in black and white. [12 Sep 2014, p.56]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  14. Neither fully a comedy nor a drama, Transparent is simply transcendent. [19/26 Sep 2014, p.123]
  15. We're taught that good drama relies on characters changing over time. Here, McDormand proves that a character's refusal to change can be just as compelling, and she hints at that stubbornness in exquisitely subtle fashion.
  16. If the hospital staff is desensitized to basic human dignity, the show makes sure its audience never is. [14/21 Nov 2014, p.100]
  17. The show nails a stellar one-two punch, playing the rapid-fire barbs exchanged between the pigeon and Queensberry against Tyson's straight-ahead buzz-saw gags.
  18. Such a nice surprise: A sharply written show about a mother-daughter relationship filled with vibrant emotions instead of cheap sarcasm.
  19. At its best, Friends operates like a first-rate Broadway farce, complete with slamming doors, twisty plots, and intricately strung together jokes. And even when it's not at its best, the crack acting and piquant punchlines give Friends a momentum and charm that win you over even if you're not laughing.
  20. The show's energetic fearlessness in depicting someone who is fearful in her loneliness gives Ally McBeal an overriding purpose. The result is irresistible television, whether you experience it as a sexual-differences safari or as a blueprint for your own life.
  21. It not only has all the classic sitcom ingredients but also adds a new, more refined aggression to the mix.
  22. Sex and violence certainly have their place here, but they're placed in the context of a vivid city that, as dangerous, seamy, and profane as it can be, is a place you want to revisit every week.
  23. King has turned out to be a near-perfect synthesis of Seinfeld and [Everybody Loves] Raymond, recombining many of the best elements of each show into something wholly, delightfully new.
  24. There are times when you wish the jokes in this series were a little funnier, but right now its unique situations — there's comedy gold being mined from Malcolm's gifted-child class of awkward brainiacs — make it distinctive.
  25. An immensely enjoyable, carefully crafted, well-performed creation. Take it from a viewer who has given every Trek incarnation a try and always come away admiring the concept but disappointed with the execution: Voyager hits pay dirt.
  26. The more leisurely pace allows for some singular moments. [17 Mar 2006, p.101]
  27. In its pilot episode, Chicago Hope looked smart but trite — Trapper John, M.D. with book-learnin'. ... [But David E.] Kelley's writing in [the second] episode is worth any number of Picket Fences.
  28. Brooklyn Bridge is beguiling, simultaneously the warmest and most intelligent new show of the season. It's also a vindication of artistic control in the TV industry.
  29. 'Scrubs' is a TV rarity: a new sitcom with an original look and point of view, and the merciful absence of a familiar star attempting a comeback.
  30. [The first episodes are] four of 24's best hours to date. [20 Jan 2006, p.59]
    • Entertainment Weekly

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