Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,126 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 An Unreasonable Man
Lowest review score: 0 Patch Adams
Score distribution:
5,126 movie reviews
  1. The Wizard of Oz remains the weirdest, scariest, kookiest, most haunting and indelible kid-flick-that's-really-for-adults ever made in Hollywood.
  2. Like Michael Apted in his "Seven Up!" documentary series, Linklater makes you feel as if you're watching a photograph as it develops in the darkroom.
  3. The picture was made in 1969 and is only now being released in the U.S., in a beautiful restoration supervised by original cinematographer Pierre Lhomme.
  4. Like any great myth, Pan's Labyrinth encodes its messages through displays of magic. And like any good fairy tale, it is also embroidered with threads of death and loss.
  5. Hoop Dreams is an astonishing emotional experience — it has highs, lows, and everything in between.
  6. It becomes as savage as ''Reservoir Dogs,'' ''The Killing,'' or any of the other dozens of films over which it still casts a shadow.
  7. Nothing good happens in 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days, the riveting, horrifying chronicle of an illegal abortion performed in 1987 when Ceauescu's dictatorial hand still gripped Romania's throat. And yet no lover of greatness in filmmaking will want to look away from one of the very best movies of 2007.
  8. It's Ejiofor's extraordinary performance that holds 12 Years a Slave together.
  9. Ratatouille is a blithe concoction, as well as a miraculously textured piece of animated design.
  10. They're like gods at play, paragons of pure delight, as they mock and feign their way through a universe of mere mortals. To see the movie again is to realize that they were never entirely of this earth and that they never will be.
  11. The miracle of the movie is the way that director Alfonso Cuarón, using special effects and 3-D with a nearly poetic simplicity and command, places the audience right up there in space along with them.
  12. The power of The Social Network is that Zuckerberg is a weasel with a mission that can never be dismissed. The movie suggests that he may have built his ambivalence about human connection into Facebook's very DNA. That's what makes him a jerk-hero for our time.
  13. Once in a long while, a fresh-from-the-headlines movie - like "All the President's Men" or "United 93" - fuses journalism, procedural high drama, and the oxygenated atmosphere of a thriller into a new version of history written with lightning. Zero Dark Thirty, Kathryn Bigelow's meticulous and electrifying re-creation of the hunt for Osama bin Laden, is that kind of movie.
  14. Farhadi is no mere formalist. His film is a spiritual investigation into the rise of women and the descent of male privilege in Iran, and a look at the toll that has taken. In a movie of flawless acting, it is Moadi - terse, proud, angry, haunted - who shows us that rare thing: a soul in transition.
  15. Before Midnight confounds expectations in powerful and even haunting ways. It's not just darker than the previous two films. It's bigger, deeper, and more searching. It follows the characters through a tale of embattled love that extends far beyond them.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    This gonzo satiric thriller is a riveting portrait of early-60's paranoia. [15 Nov 1996, p.82]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  16. A triumph of psychological depth and artistic brilliance offered as the magical adventures of one skinny little girl.
  17. In E.T., Spielberg proved a herald of the age when moviegoers would make full-time friends with fantasy, but his most special effect was taking us into ourselves.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    [Tarantino's] ability to take what seem like minor conversational themes and dovetail them onto later exchanges for maximum comic effect is close to genius. And the action can be literally heart-stopping.
  18. Way ahead of its time 30 years ago, and just as stunning today, Killer of Sheep is one of those marvels of original moviemaking that keeps hope of artistic independence alive.
  19. The result is an intense, action-driven war pic, a muscular, efficient standout that simultaneously conveys the feeling of combat from within as well as what it looks like on the ground.
  20. It whisks you to another world, then makes it every inch our own.
  21. Nearly four decades ago, Pontecorvo anatomized the very form of modern terrorist warfare: the hidden cells, the cultish leaders, the brutish cycle of attack and counterattack.
  22. It's an intoxicating feeling when a movie excites and enlivens us like this -- and there's a particular giddiness to be had in thinking about what movies can (but don't often) do for one's soul after imbibing such a fine vintage.
  23. The conclusion of Peter Jackson's masterwork is passionate and literate, detailed and expansive, and it's conceived with a risk-taking flair for old-fashioned movie magic at its most precious.
  24. A rivetingly journalistic account of a scoundrel's rise and fall.
  25. In Amour, these two actors show us what love is, what it really looks like, and what it may, at its most secret moments, demand.
  26. It seems pompous and scattershot now -- a tweaking of privileged European smugness that unfolds with a playful daisy-chain logic but has the tone of a quaint, doddering lecture.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Funny and scary, Reversal is a tour de force for Schroeder, who examines the idle rich, the intricacies of the legal system, and the imperatives of morality concisely but with unmatched brio.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  27. Soaring and romantic, wild and serene, feminist and gutsy, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon is one of the best movies of the year.
  28. Spielberg restages the Holocaust with an existential vividness unprecedented in any nondocumentary film: He makes us feel as if we're living right inside the 20th century's darkest-and most defining-episode.
  29. Extraordinary new documentary that turns Robert Crumb's twisted life story into a disturbing, exhilarating work of biographical art.
  30. With Inside Llewyn Davis, they've made a film that is almost spooky in its perversity: a lovingly lived-in, detailed tribute to the folk scene that — hauntingly — has shut their hero out.
  31. These 173 minutes don't drag, they waltz.
  32. The most beautiful movie ever made about a man who could only move one eyelid -- almost dangerously beautiful.
  33. In a class by itself.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Another harsh character study, with poignant echoes of "Taxi Driver."
  34. Eric Rohmer’s sun-kissed love quadrangle remains as fresh and romantically profound as it was 18 years ago.
  35. For bleakness, the movie can't be beat -- nor for brilliance.
  36. The first animated feature produced entirely on computer is a magically witty and humane entertainment, a hellzapoppin fairy tale about a roomful of suburban toys who come to life when humans aren't around.
  37. Vibrantly, intricately alive on its own terms. This is what magic the movies can conjure with an inspired fellowship in charge, and unlimited pots of gold.
  38. Toy Story 3 is a salute to the magic of making believe.
  39. The result: This great work of art has the potential to change the world.
  40. Stunning, fully formed masterpiece.
  41. If ''Finding Nemo'' is an awesome Pixar superpower, The Triplets of Belleville is a charming, idiosyncratic, self-governing duchy with huge tourism potential on the other side of the animated-movie planet.
  42. The antidote to every square tough-guy caper you've ever seen, and the inspiration for many great ones. It is an existential imperative to seek out a showing and burn rubber to get there, preferably in an excellent car.
  43. Helen Mirren's allure lies not in finding what's regal in every woman she plays, but in finding what's womanly in every royal.
  44. By the end, the rug gets pulled out from under us, showing that even the reality we think we see may be an illusion.
  45. (Denis's) visual style is hypnotic, rapturous, and she makes barren landscapes look gorgeous, hard men look vulnerable.
  46. Waltz With Bashir has transcended the definitions of ''cartoon'' or ''war documentary'' to be classified as its own brilliant invention.
  47. A crowd-pleaser, all right, but, for all its appeal, a naggingly sanctimonious one.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    George C. Scott's Oscar-winning portrait of the megalomaniacal warrior general is still the glue holding together this blunt study of war as the ultimate human (and dehumanizing) game.
  48. The breath of cinematic life, though, the sensibility, the energy, belong to Joel and Ethan Coen, and this is their stirring success.
  49. The film, by seasoned cinematographer Dror Moreh, is a feat — of access and of passionate and appropriately unsettling political commentary.
  50. By the time The Crying Game is over, you'll never look at beauty in quite the same way.
  51. A movie of staggering virtuosity and raw lyric power, a masterpiece of terror, chaos, blood, and courage.
  52. There's also no romanticizing on the part of the director, who proceeds with calm, unshowy attentiveness (even in the midst of scenes of violence), creating a stunning portrait of an innately smart survivor for whom prison turns out to be a twisted opportunity for self-definition.
  53. One of the unshowiest and most true-blooded epics of Americana you're ever likely to see.
  54. Voluptuously engrossing.
  55. Remains a majestic explosion of pure cinema. It's a hallucinatory poem of fear, projecting, in its scale and spirit, a messianic vision of human warfare stretched to the flashpoint of technological and moral breakdown.
  56. It's a mad cycle of arrogance and despair, and Bloody Sunday etches it onto your nervous system.
  57. Her
    Jonze's satiric, brave-new-world premise is undeniably clever, but it's also a bit icy emotionally.
  58. Leaves you shaken and ecstatic at the same time, transported by the vision of a major film artist.
  59. You could trawl the seven seas and not net a funnier, more beautiful, and more original work of art and comedy than Finding Nemo.
  60. This is a great film, and a triumph of creativity and courage over repression.
  61. Topsy-Turvy reminds us that, in any age, creative expression is at once the most personal and most communal of enterprises.
  62. The most excitingly original movie of the year.
  63. The new film, which unfolds in real time over the course of 80 minutes, is a deeper, darker, altogether more memorable experience. It doesn't extend the characters so much as fulfill them.
  64. Dazzlingly beautiful, funny, and meaningful.
  65. Crowe, staying close to his memories, has gotten it, for perhaps the first time, onto the screen.
  66. American Splendor presents Pekar as drawn on the page, Pekar as brilliantly interpreted by Paul Giamatti, and the actual Pekar, in the double role of narrator and interview subject -- sometimes all at once. The magic act is thrilling, and truly surprising.
  67. Rachel Boynton’s gripping doc shows you what happens when the greed of oil companies meets the chaos of postcolonial Africa.
  68. The movie might almost be winking at the fact that any single one of these performers could easily be the featured star of his or her own upper-crust period piece.
  69. Pulling the bandage of sentiment cleanly away from oozing concepts like ''heroism'' and ''our nation's war on terror'' in the aftermath of recent wounds, here's a drama about the most politically charged crisis of our time that grants the dignity of autonomy to every soul involved.
  70. A beautifully sinister and transfixing entertainment-age daydream.
  71. An extraordinary film; it may be the most haunting documentary since ''Crumb.''
  72. It's a film of jaw-dropping virtuosity and pleasure, one that leaves you revved, enthralled, tickled, moved, and amazed.
  73. The Passenger isn't finally the masterpiece some have made it out to be, but it retains a singular intrigue: It's the first, and probably the last, thriller ever made about depression.
  74. The movie sparkles with witty self-awareness.
  75. What's astonishing about Sofia Coppola's enthralling new movie is the precision, maturity, and originality with which the confident young writer-director communicates so clearly in a cinematic language all her own.
  76. Like a great novel from a more expansive bygone age, The Best of Youth is full of big thoughts; like a great soap opera, it's also full of sharp plot turns, vibrant characters, and great talk. It is, in short, the best of cinema.
  77. Utterly riveting fictional drama.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    Surprisingly, given Lee's penchant for experimentation, there's nothing remotely innovative about this sober, often intensely moving exploration of a community's lingering grief and outrage -- just the usual talking heads, stock footage, montages of stills, and such.
  78. An outrageously gorgeous spectacle of balletic aggression. At the same time, it offers something we rarely encounter in a whirling martial-arts extravaganza: a romantic passion that's woven into the very fabric of the action.
  79. Ida
    With her brassy, determined aunt, Ida sets off to find answers and discovers life beyond the convent walls in this leisurely but satisfying journey.
  80. The gorgeous music includes Ralph Vaughan Williams' wafting tone poem ''The Lark Ascending'' -- apt in describing an artist who might well be part bird.
  81. A film of droll and dry observational precision, its emotional minimalism is almost fetishistic -- and, by the end, a tad frustrating.
  82. When Baron Cohen works without a net, he flies.
  83. Ferguson spotlights two massive mistakes: the looting that was allowed to continue, destroying Iraqi infrastructure and morale; and--far more revelatory -- the apocalyptically stupid decision to disband the Iraqi army, sending half a million angry soldiers into the streets.
  84. The result is a playful, elusive movie that isn't so much heartwarming as soul-cleansing.
  85. Facing a diagnosis of Alzheimer's, the older woman enrolls in a poetry class, desperate to find the words to describe beauty before language fails her. She does even better: She herself becomes a kind of poem about what it means to really see the world.
  86. Days after I saw The Artist, I was still thinking (and grinning) about it, because the movie's real romance is the one between us, the jaded 21st-century audience, and the mechanical innocence of old movies, which here becomes new again.
  87. By the end, Campion views all her characters with a compassion bordering on grace, a humanity-like her heroine's-as dark, quiet, and enveloping as the ocean.
  88. Watching Eternal Sunshine, you don't just watch a love story -- you fall in love with what love really is.
  89. Clint Eastwood's profound, magisterial, and gripping companion piece to his ambitious meditation on wartime image and reality, "Flags of Our Fathers."
  90. Until Once, I'm not sure that I'd ever seen a small-scale, nonstylized, kitchen-sink drama in which the songs take on the majesty and devotion of a musical dream.
  91. A buoyant, funny, and disarmingly humane comedy of beautiful losers in revolt.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of those rare gems that prove equally stunning on both aesthetic and cerebral levels.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  92. Sad, funny, sexy, and altogether marvelous.
  93. Capote honors its subject by doing just what Truman Capote did. It teases, fascinates, and haunts.

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