Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 6,084 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Rampart
Lowest review score: 0 Snow Day
Score distribution:
6084 movie reviews
  1. Cronenberg directs this doomed romance in the same flat, claustrophobic, night-of-the-zombies style he employed in ''Naked Lunch''; as a dramatist, he's still stuck in Interzone.
  2. It’s a movie that desperately wants to be timely and relevant, warning us about the Brave New World threats we all face when it comes to privacy, surveillance, and freedom. But it’s so cartoony and ham-fisted it sabotages its own argument.
  3. The whole thing feels like the pilot episode of a third-rate comic-book vigilante TV show.
  4. Creator producers Paul Germain and Joe Ansolabehere have come up with some unexceptional children and underdeveloped adults.
  5. Croft is one humorless butt-kicker. Excavations in exotic lands have rarely looked so much like items on a to-do list.
  6. The film's generic feminism pales beside its bloated sense of privilege, only underlined by a nonstop cabaret of sideshow acts.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Quiet and sleepy.
  7. A sad-but-hopeful, dramatic-but-gentle fairy tale intentionally made less upsetting for teens.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    G
    "The Great Gatsby" was famously bungled in the pulseless 1974 movie with Robert Redford. G, which updates the story with an African-American cast, is another strikeout, further destroying F. Scott Fitzgerald's film batting average.
  8. Deliberately quaint and old-fashioned, a once-over-slightly exercise in nostalgic wonder directed by the British-born great-grandson of H.G. Wells, who treats the spirit of his ancestor's novel with literal-minded fealty.
  9. Schlock weeper.
  10. Amusing in its very shallowness.
  11. It turns out that Joe ends up liking the old Joe better too. Who just so happens to be the kind of average-Joe character that continues to make Allen such a tidy, non-Joe bundle.
  12. Evenness of political keel, combined with a generic filmmaking style, is an artistic weapon way too puny for a successful assault on so tough, bruising, and crucial a subject.
  13. Adrien Brody completists will appreciate Love the Hard Way, if only as an example of the kind of self-conscious, brat-noir projects their man probably won't be doing anymore.
  14. Daredevil is the sort of half-assed, visually lackadaisical potboiler that makes you rue the day that comic-book franchises ever took over Hollywood.
  15. Watching it all unfold and slowly go off the rails, you can't help but wonder what Pfister's mentor, Nolan, might have done with the same material. My guess is he would have sent the script back for a Page One rewrite for starters.
  16. The plot may be fairly predictable, but Harrelson goes all in as the deranged preacher, and he’s a delight to watch, whether he’s wiggling his eyebrow tattoos or prancing about town on horseback, dressed in an all-white suit. Hemsworth, on the other hand, remains monotone.
  17. Just when you think you know where Burnt is headed, there’s an underhanded twist about halfway in. And it’s almost enough to set the movie right.
  18. Has no pretentions to be anything more than a goose-bumpy fantasy theme-park ride for kids, but it's such a routine ride.
  19. The film has flashes of psychedelic visual energy, but its story is limp.
  20. The movie is a morals-free procession of bang bang bang! and blood blood blood!, and men slamming each other with blunt objects and slicing each other with blades.
  21. Slipshod rather than sly. There's no fury to the movie, repressed or otherwise, which may be why when the Revolution arrives, it has all the impact of a guillotine with a deadly dull blade.
  22. Director Chris Columbus...seals this comedy in an impenetrable bubble of hollow humanism.
  23. Aggressively drab and granular, the movie feels like a late-'80s AIDS passion play given an ill-fitting post-Sept. 11 makeover.
  24. At no time do the men -- that is, the straight ones -- believably hold the upper hand. In the new town of Stepford, there's no bitterness, no struggle, no competition, none of the scars of the sexual revolution. There's just gay apparel.
  25. The goons themselves, though, look rather chic, flying through the air in Galliano-goes-to-hell garments straight out of Vampire Vogue.
  26. The Great Wall looks like it could be a really amazing video game. Alas, it’s a movie, and kind of a brick.
  27. The first thing to say about The Bucket List is that Rob Reiner is the rare director who can take all the wonder out of one of the seven wonders of the world.
  28. Trite lessons are learned. Plotlines play out in familiar arcs. A few blips of sex and drug use aim to make the movie feel more grown-up. Instead, they make it off-limits to the only age group likely to find any charm in its smug Britcom cutesiness.

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