Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,223 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Bubble
Lowest review score: 0 The King and I
Score distribution:
5,223 movie reviews
  1. Yagira's performance is so extraordinary, it won him the best actor prize at the 2004 Cannes film festival.
  2. Leigh gives you such a strong sense of his characters as fluky individuals that even his most lackadaisical scenes are alive with possibility. What holds Life Is Sweet together is his perception — at once funny and wise — that people, when they change at all, do so in small, nearly imperceptible ways, and that that may be enough.
  3. It makes sense that L'Enfant has been hailed as a masterpiece, since a masterpiece is what it's trying, in every unvarnished frame, to be. If you wandered unknowingly into the film, however, you would see this: a stark, fascinating, and naggingly detached character study.
  4. If you can appreciate the sight of two totally dialed-in performers simmering until they boil over, that's enough. And P.S., that's pretty much the definition of jazz.
  5. A graceful, unsentimental, well-made movie.
  6. The richest and most satisfying romantic movie of the year. It's really about two great loves at once -- the love of life and of art -- and the way that Shakespeare, like no writer before him, transformed the one into the other.
  7. Naples-born Servillo is a national star, famed as a theater, opera, and film director as well as an actor. And he's got the face of a mensch (or a Madoff) -- which makes his embodiment of criminal banality all the more identifiable, as well as horrifying.
  8. So superb, so graceful, so strong -- another beauty in this year of good documentaries -- that I do believe it will influence career choices, sending inspired viewers to study pedagogy, or cinematography.
  9. It's the rare kind of moviegoing experience that will haunt you long after you leave the theater and lead to some very awkward conversations with your spouse.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    It boasts a more consistent tone, better special effects (such as villains throwing buses around like paper planes), and even an affecting love story.
  10. As a coming-of-age story, the film is a bit uneventful. But the girls’ rebellious, fist-in-the-air spirit and the warmth of their friendship are undeniable.
  11. Bestows generous blessings on all that's good in Englishness, in moviedom, and, of course, in cheese.
  12. This is Robert Redford doing what too many stars should do and don't: taking a chance. And reinventing his art. It's an extraordinary thing to see.
  13. Unfolds with a simplicity that's as breathtaking as its inevitability is harrowing.
  14. In the juxtaposition of cataclysmic matter-of-fact misery and cinematic poetry, the filmmaker finds a calmly stunning way to convey the experience of living with death as something intimate, and, unnervingly, almost natural.
  15. Errol Morris may have been put on earth to make The Fog of War, a stunning portrait of Robert S. McNamara that closes a year of outstanding nonfiction movies on a high note.
  16. Spirit, animal, and human worlds coexist in dreamy harmony in this remarkable drama.
  17. Brokeback Mountain is that rare thing, a big Hollywood weeper with a beautiful ache at its center. It's a modern-age Western that turns into a quietly revolutionary love story.
  18. No one charts the wilds of childhood more precisely than the Dardennes.
  19. In an age when horror movies have mostly become lazy and toothless, here's one with ambition and bite.
  20. The thrilling conclusion to a phenomenal cinematic story 10 years in the telling, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows - Part 2 is proof that authentic movie excitement is its own form of magic.
  21. Painfully beautiful autobiographical kaleidoscope.
  22. The filmmaking is as strong as the subject matter, with an elegant structure.
  23. In the end, cancer may have cruelly taken Roger Ebert's voice, but it couldn't silence his greatest gift: his ability to speak to his audience directly, honestly, and with empathy. Thumbs up.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The fairy-tale tableau lifts from Hans Christian Andersen but is shot through with bits of burlesque sci-fi, including a giant robot with an orchestra in its chest.
  24. Shine beams with warmth, sensitivity, and fine taste.
    • Entertainment Weekly
  25. A mesmerizing work of disturbing power and unease.
  26. Almodóvar's masterwork, is a spectacular synthesis of everything that has always interested him -- proud women, lovely boys, beautiful drag queens, grand movie stars, gorgeous frocks, wild wallpaper .
  27. Lusts for catharsis yet never quite gets there, because, for all of its bitter romantic anguish, it ultimately coalesces in your head rather than your heart.
  28. The supersmart and rousing Moneyball, which may be the best baseball movie since "Bull Durham," is also about talk, but in a coolly heady and original inside-the-front-office way.

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