Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 3,375 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 81% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 18% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 78
Highest review score: 100 Get Away From Me
Lowest review score: 0 Playing With Fire
Score distribution:
3375 music reviews
    • 48 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Eye Legacy is but another posthumous compilation matching a much-missed talent's unused vocals (many from an eight-year-old solo album that only came out overseas) with tinny new beats and random guests.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    More a retread than a renaissance. [3/23/2001, p.114]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 48 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    At 24, though, she's still treading an overly familiar pop-rock trail already better blazed by 16-year-old Miley Cyrus, and Guilty Pleasure isn't so much pleasurable as simply vapid.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    It's topped off by truly terrible rapping, which often turns otherwise groan-inspiring instrumentals into jumbled, maddening filler.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    For music ostensibly inspired by a trippy fantasy, far too much here is depressingly ordinary.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Weighed down by artificially inflated anthems, garbled lyrics about the apocalypse, and coy attempts at surrealism. [6 Feb 2004, p.140]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Murder ultimately drowns in flavorless thrashing. [1 Apr 2011, p.77]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 47 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    A slew of mostly midtempo clunkers built with her weapons of choice: faux grit and forced sensuality. [24 Dec 2004, p.71]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 47 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Their fourth album genuflects once again to the standard over-revered '70s idols. [301 Mar 2012, p.75]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite the star power she emits on screen, her vocals have always been less than stellar; on LOVE? she often sounds limited and nasal, with a flatness that can feel downright Rebecca Black-esque at its worst.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    A typical morass of computerized beat science, vague exoticism, and singer Gibby Haynes' crackpot mantras... [7 Sep 2001, p.164]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    A large chunk is bogged down by extended outros and lyrical inanities. [19 Jan 2007, p.81]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Every genre cliché, from homogenized harmonies to delicately plucked stringed instruments to male rapper interjections, is securely in place. The music is so tasteful, restrained, and assembly line proficient that it makes early singles like ''Say You'll Be There'' sound like the rawest punk rock.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Some Kind of Trouble comes off as inert and oddly hollow; apart from the album's comparatively lively bookends.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A dull slog with a dearth of hooks and a surfeit of gangsta cliches. [21 Nov 2003, p.87]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Again, he saddles his guests with stupendously pedestrian material. [4 Nov 2005, p.72]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 45 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    Como Ama does represent a victory for Lopez by offering fairly persuasive proof that, contrary to rumor, she can sing, and without a regiment of background choralists. All that bulking up she's been doing at the vocal gym isn't enough, though, to turn flaccid torch songs into muscle.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Lee DeWyze's debut album Live It Up suffers from vague production that strips his Adam Duritz-y growl of all humor, anger, and sexuality.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Old School New Rules leans heavily on that persona, spewing Internet-troll claptrap about the "gotcha" media and impinged freedom.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Thankfully, there are a few genuinely affecting moments.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 58 Critic Score
    [“Break Up Every Night” is] an actual dance cut. The other cuts are basically ballads with beats--modernized Moby without the soul-searching or gospel samples.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Every song feels like a retread of some hit you've heard before, somewhere. [21 Oct 2005, p.73]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Anyone else offering up such hokum would do it with tongue fairly deep in cheek. Not Lenny Kravitz. [21 May 2004, p.76]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 42 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    You'll be safe from falling stuntmen, but the soundtrack to Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark, Broadway's notorious mega-musical poses a more mundane risk: boredom.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    The best production can't hide Hoodstar's lack of imagination. [22 Sep 2006, p.95]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The tedious MOR power ballads can't seem to get out of low gear. [13 Jun 2003, p. 96]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    This corny comeback is hardly a triumphant return. [24 Jun 2005, p.165]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Surprisingly pedestrian. [18 Aug 2006, p.138]
    • Entertainment Weekly
    • 38 Metascore
    • 42 Critic Score
    Almost nothing here swerves out of Fortune's featherweight club-funk cruising lane.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    There's promise in three new funk workouts toward the end; they suggest it's time for a whole new thing.