Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 1,807 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 15% same as the average critic
  • 20% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The Alzheimer's Project
Lowest review score: 0 Justice for Natalee Holloway
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1374
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1374
1,374 tv reviews
  1. It's getting difficult to keep coming up with superlatives for this sophomore-season drama, especially with a thrilling and tantalizing episode like tonight's.
  2. The best friends double down with absurd antics that would make even their season 1 selves blush. [16 Jan 2015, p.70]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  3. Mad Men offers a two-hour season premiere that commences with a muted tone and then explodes in different directions. [23 Mar 2012, p.62]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  4. The fifth and final season of David Simon's peerlessly acted, stunningly scripted, revolutionary drama of 1,000 moving parts kicks off Jan. 6.
  5. Hannibal captures your imagination with the prospect of Graham using his imagination to figure a way out. [28 Feb 2014, p.65]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  6. Season 2 is just as brainy and twisty and kinky [as season 1], and it ratchets up the suspense by making the threats to our "heroes" even more personal.
  7. What Buscemi brings to this production is his great gift for channeling neurotic self-consciousness into a man of action. He may fret about retaining his empire, but you believe Nucky Thompson is a lord of venality, right down to his immaculate spats.
  8. Burns' illuminating series turns the Roosevelt clan into a colorful Wes Anderson movie, albeit one in black and white. [12 Sep 2014, p.56]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  9. Watching these two friends bond anew--and meeting a more empathetic. vulnerable Holmes--makes for warm and witty fun. [17 Jan 2014, p.61]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  10. Brooklyn Bridge is beguiling, simultaneously the warmest and most intelligent new show of the season. It's also a vindication of artistic control in the TV industry.
  11. Smart, unruly, and very fast, Arrested is the ultimate TV series for our TiVo age.
  12. Although its style is novel, 24 hews to traditional crime-story conventions; you could plop this plot into a two-hour TV movie and be done with it. The advantage of the real-time hour becomes apparent, however, in the depth of characterization achieved by stretching things out.
  13. This may be the first TV show since Pee-wee's Playhouse to treasure youth even as it embodies all of its contradictions, craziness, hopes, and fears (and I'd like to point out that Freaks is the only hour-long sitcom I've ever seen that sustains funniness for its full 60 minutes).
  14. You will feel guilty for laughing so hard, which is, I suspect, precisely the reaction David wants.
  15. Congrats to Bob's Burgers star H. Jon Benjamin, who is now voicing the lead on two of TV's funniest shows. [28 Jan 2011, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  16. The artistic achievement of Treme is that it blends bluntness with the nuances of gorgeous music.
  17. The premiere jumps the series from 1960 to 1962, but it plays coy with most of last season's cliff-hangers, including the whereabouts of Peggy's son with married exec Pete Campbell (played with oily brilliance by Vincent Kartheiser). It's quite a tease, but the debut proves Mad Men is as smart as ever
  18. There are times when you wish the jokes in this series were a little funnier, but right now its unique situations — there's comedy gold being mined from Malcolm's gifted-child class of awkward brainiacs — make it distinctive.
  19. Like Betty's frumpy frocks, Mad Men's supersize episodes aren't flattering. Weiner should stick with tighter, denser storytelling packages. I hope he also delivers the season of change that the premiere seems to promise.
  20. The series is full of surprises ... And as Tony, Gandolfini gives a magnificently shrewd, wary performance. If, like me, you thought you never wanted to watch another Mob story, be sure to check this out.
  21. More and more, this series is looking like a minor classic, which I mean as a major complement. [20 Jan 2012, p.70]
  22. Our greatest pleasure lies in anticipation of what is to come this season.
  23. The mystery of just what happened to the child unspools almost languidly against the backdrop of wild and gorgeous New Zealand country. The ugliness of humans amid such beauty resounds like a cold slap.
  24. If Felicity doesn't quite live up to its hype as the season's niftiest new show, it's on its way to being a solid weekly soap opera.
  25. There are many ways in which Ed, the best new show of the season, could have been perfectly awful.
  26. Those unfamiliar with the film may find some scenes--like when the actors break character to tell their real-life stories--a bit jarring. [7 Apr 2006, p.54]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  27. By the end of the opening hour, you're already engaged by Coach Taylor's challenge to turn the East Dillon stragglers into guys who can complete the phrase ''Clear eyes, full hearts, can't lose'' without mumbling. And Friday Night Lights is headed for more touchdown episodes than you can count.
  28. Gritty-smart horror that nicely complements BBC America's sci-fi sensation Orphan Black. [9 May 2014, p.57]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  29. It possesses a different rhythm from any other show on TV. [13 Apr 2012, p.73]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  30. The cases (a baby at risk, a man with lung cancer, an unconscious drunk) are surprisingly moving, the editing only mildly manipulative, and you genuinely feel there's an element of reality to the show, a rare trait indeed for reality TV.

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