Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 2,357 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 66% higher than the average critic
  • 13% same as the average critic
  • 21% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 Louie: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 Drawn Together: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1811
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1811
1811 tv reviews
  1. For all its bleakness and darkness, there's a glowing exhilaration about this series: It's a feel-good show about feeling really bad.
  2. As bright-eyed and bushy-tailed as it was in its first season, Girls may now be even spunkier, funnier, and riskier. [11 Jan 2013, p.80]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  3. It's the sarcasm (see: Adam Scott), smart dialogue, and refreshing take on the workplace comedy that make the somewhat depressing premise a totally raucous party.
  4. Judging by the first four episodes, though, it’s not only a gripping true-crime story, it’s also the most moral one I’ve seen in a long time.
  5. Certainly, the show is still exciting and thoughtful in the way that it disassembles many pat notions we may have of tribe loyalty, family bonds, and the treachery of the business world.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    Six seasons in, and Sunny continues to be a shining example of how to expertly combine smart political commentary with the basest of humor.
  6. A fresh, sharp-edged comedy that swerves past nearly every cliché.
  7. Rock manages to layer in quieter scenes between Baldwin and Jack McBrayer's Kenneth the Page that remind you of an iron law of feather-light farce: No matter how crazy the characters seem to us, they have to relate to each other as though they're making perfect sense.
  8. The first two episodes contain strong subplots about staff downsizing and rolled-back pensions, indicators that Ted is doing a better job of folding real-life resonances into its silliness.
  9. Sex and violence certainly have their place here, but they're placed in the context of a vivid city that, as dangerous, seamy, and profane as it can be, is a place you want to revisit every week.
  10. They say analyzing comedy kills it, but in this case, it's one revelation after another. Add rare footage of their early years, some non-Python TV appearances, tense on-set footage filmed during the making of their movies, and clips of their greatest hits, and you've got Monty nirvana.
  11. As in Office Space, the heart of the show is watching Richard and his friends struggle to make sense of themselves and their purpose. They're good, weird guys you want to hang out with.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    This series is officially on fire now.
  12. There are funny moments and heartbreaking ones on this fascinating docuseries. [13 Jul 2012, p.68]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  13. It all feels been-there, done-that. Slow-burn start? Maybe. Or maybe Justified's own pipeline has run dry.
  14. Forgoing its recent dip into somnambulism, Empire is (literally) all guns blazing again.
  15. The pie puns continue to make me wince--Olive says she’s ''really flaky,'' while Lily accuses her of being ''all pious.'' And Chi McBride's cynical detective still feels oddly disconnected from the rest of the ensemble. But the show has a fresh, vigorous snap, and the impeccably deadpan Pace gets off some good lines.
  16. We know that a guilty, defensive Jackie is the best Jackie to watch.
  17. The show's vision remains consistent. It's a world so absurdly horrible that clowns seem besides the point, and the only sensible response is dark, deadpan humor. [20 Jan 2017, p.55]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  18. As sweet as treacle tart, the third season of Downton Abbey arrives reasonably fresh and warm. [11 Jan 2013, p.74]
  19. Lisa Kudrow is hilarious as online shrink Fiona Wallice, but her true talent is making those around her even funnier.
  20. The continually surprising comedy returns in fantastic form. [31 Jul 2015, p.55]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  21. Season 3 of Orange might be a slow peel with some sour bites, but its overwhelming richness reaffirms its standing as one of television’s ripest, zestiest shows.
  22. The ending is satisfying without betraying the nuanced writing and characterization that came before.
  23. Fresh blood and sharp ideas make for delicious, smart-pulp fangoria. [22/29 Apr 2016, p.105]
    • Entertainment Weekly
  24. Really, my only significant complaint about the new '24' is an excessive use of its visual trademark: split-screen images. These are fine when they're used to let you know where major characters are in different subplots simultaneously, but in next week's episode, there's a split-screen shot that separates two characters talking in the same room together!
  25. A propulsive, plot-driven narrative and performances remarkable for their emotional depth and physicality keep you constantly engaged. A strong imagination for the slave experience—their ambivalence about the Revolutionary War; their attitudes about love, family, religion—yields dramatic richness and cultivates great empathy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    If you think catching up on Smash's injury, Lyla and Riggins' new relationship, and Lyla's now-AWOL mom is overwhelming, just think how Tami (Connie Britton) must feel.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Critic Score
    The first of Mad Men’s final seven episodes is as fine as a silky fur, give or take a hilariously hideous period mustache and some too-on-the-nose lines and symbolism.
  26. Luther avoids some genre cliches--we know the killer's identity from the get-go, which sidesteps the time-stamp predictability of a Law & Order episode--but plunges headfirst into others.

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