Entertainment Weekly's Scores

For 5,827 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 68% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 30% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Antz
Lowest review score: 0 Penelope
Score distribution:
5827 movie reviews
  1. By the end, the rug gets pulled out from under us, showing that even the reality we think we see may be an illusion.
  2. E.T. is ultimately a tale of love, and the film becomes a cathartic leap into pure feeling. [2002 re-release]
  3. (Denis's) visual style is hypnotic, rapturous, and she makes barren landscapes look gorgeous, hard men look vulnerable.
  4. Waltz With Bashir has transcended the definitions of ''cartoon'' or ''war documentary'' to be classified as its own brilliant invention.
  5. A crowd-pleaser, all right, but, for all its appeal, a naggingly sanctimonious one.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    George C. Scott's Oscar-winning portrait of the megalomaniacal warrior general is still the glue holding together this blunt study of war as the ultimate human (and dehumanizing) game.
  6. The breath of cinematic life, though, the sensibility, the energy, belong to Joel and Ethan Coen, and this is their stirring success.
  7. The film, by seasoned cinematographer Dror Moreh, is a feat — of access and of passionate and appropriately unsettling political commentary.
  8. Ida
    With her brassy, determined aunt, Ida sets off to find answers and discovers life beyond the convent walls in this leisurely but satisfying journey.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Only Yesterday may have been released in 1991 and take place in 1982 and 1966, but Taeko’s reflection on girlhood is truly timeless.
  9. 13th is a titanic statement by a major American voice. Viewing — right now — should be mandatory.
  10. By the time The Crying Game is over, you'll never look at beauty in quite the same way.
  11. A movie of staggering virtuosity and raw lyric power, a masterpiece of terror, chaos, blood, and courage.
  12. One of the unshowiest and most true-blooded epics of Americana you're ever likely to see.
  13. Voluptuously engrossing.
  14. Remains a majestic explosion of pure cinema. It's a hallucinatory poem of fear, projecting, in its scale and spirit, a messianic vision of human warfare stretched to the flashpoint of technological and moral breakdown.
  15. It's a mad cycle of arrogance and despair, and Bloody Sunday etches it onto your nervous system.
  16. Her
    Jonze's satiric, brave-new-world premise is undeniably clever, but it's also a bit icy emotionally.
  17. Leaves you shaken and ecstatic at the same time, transported by the vision of a major film artist.
  18. You could trawl the seven seas and not net a funnier, more beautiful, and more original work of art and comedy than Finding Nemo.
  19. This is a great film, and a triumph of creativity and courage over repression.
  20. Topsy-Turvy reminds us that, in any age, creative expression is at once the most personal and most communal of enterprises.
  21. The most excitingly original movie of the year.
  22. The new film, which unfolds in real time over the course of 80 minutes, is a deeper, darker, altogether more memorable experience. It doesn't extend the characters so much as fulfill them.
  23. Dazzlingly beautiful, funny, and meaningful.
  24. There's also no romanticizing on the part of the director, who proceeds with calm, unshowy attentiveness (even in the midst of scenes of violence), creating a stunning portrait of an innately smart survivor for whom prison turns out to be a twisted opportunity for self-definition.
  25. Crowe, staying close to his memories, has gotten it, for perhaps the first time, onto the screen.
  26. American Splendor presents Pekar as drawn on the page, Pekar as brilliantly interpreted by Paul Giamatti, and the actual Pekar, in the double role of narrator and interview subject -- sometimes all at once. The magic act is thrilling, and truly surprising.
  27. Rachel Boynton’s gripping doc shows you what happens when the greed of oil companies meets the chaos of postcolonial Africa.
  28. The movie might almost be winking at the fact that any single one of these performers could easily be the featured star of his or her own upper-crust period piece.

Top Trailers