Eurogamer's Scores

  • Games
For 4,687 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 31% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Sunless Sea
Lowest review score: 10 Ninjabread Man
Score distribution:
4,687 game reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Fan of the first two games will initially feel at home here but, under prolonged scrutiny it reveals itself to be the weakest of the set.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As you alternate furiously between confusion and excitement, the explosive gaggle never lets up even for a moment. You'll launch a curtain of certain death, dash, homing missile strike, dash. Dash dash. Laser in the face. Die! WHY WON'T YOU DIE?
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    X-Men Origins: Wolverine may be unapologetically violent, but it's also unapologetically repetitive, and it's the one apology that needs to be made.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Remove brand loyalty from the equation and between the existing online pleasures of Warhawk, Killzone 2, Metal Gear Online, GRAW2 and Rainbow Six, with the promise of even more realistic and tactical games such as Operation Flashpoint and ArmA 2 in the near future, it's hard to imagine why any PS3 armchair soldier would want to invest too much time in a game this small, ordinary and generic.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    IT'S LESS THAN AN HOUR LONG.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's good, uncomplicated fun, but you won't ever want more than the demo version supplied with the Xbox Live Starter Kit. As a £40 purchase, Whacked! can get F---ed!
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The problem underlining it all is that the games are way too easy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In my mind, said mixed bag, when emptied onto the table, would yield all manner of mostly shiny looking baubles, most of which have some redeeming features but very few of which are worth pursuing for longer than a couple of minutes.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's certainly one for the fans and Neo Geo completionists, but curious retro-heads and fighting game fans might get the wrong impression of SNK if they buy this particular compilation.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Neither a triumph of design nor storytelling and stymied by poor execution, Wayward Manor is a rough proposition. But there's something worthwhile here, even if it's the unusual power fantasy of being able to haunt an aristocratic family from the safety of the rafters.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Ease of using the touch-screen aside, it's something we'd prefer to flick to on the mobile while on the bus rather than dedicate the DS slot to. Nevertheless, it fulfils its puzzling duties.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The best thing you can say about the game is that it's technically impressive, and the openworld structure is a good idea - but that's it. The game's central purpose seems to be to make dismemberment as easy to pull off as possible, but as soon as that novelty has worn off you're left with a hollow, repetitive experience which quickly loses its initial appeal.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Combine this ruthless beating with the ugly stick with the essential lack of variety inherent in these arcade air combat games and you have a title only really worth considering once it's in the bargain bins.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, it also features some of the things that remind us why adventure games fell out of the mainstream, with tedious fetch quests, aggravating scenarios and a spirit-crushing trash-sorting mini-game conspiring to gradually strip the joy out of it all.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's the little things that add up, one by one, to an often hypnotically bland, slapdash campaign. The core is sound enough, but Burning Skies is far too shabby in places for what is supposed to be the flagship first-party shooter on the Vita - indeed, the flagship shooter on handhelds, full stop.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The presence of three subtly different modes (Dodge, Juggle and Infinite) twists the rules a touch, but its lustre soon diminishes. What you're left with is the skeleton of a cute idea, but for the price, that's probably fair enough.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    For pennies, you really can't go wrong. Just don't expect too much, and you might just find Dracula satisfying in an endearingly low-budget sort of way.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    All of this would have been acceptable in the nineties, but expectations change. Sure, it's only a few quid, but for once it feels like you're getting what you pay for.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A bad game? Not really: just an underwhelming one. Your pulse may quicken occasionally, but your world is unlikely to turn upside down.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The whole thing just feels a bit half-baked, with moody but unimaginative environments, done-to-death one-dimensional characters, exceptionally tired gameplay mechanics that favours basic A-to-B object collection rather than injecting anything even vaguely resembling a puzzle and a combat system that's at best functional, and at worst unhelpful.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In other words, it's just like all those other racing games you read about but never buy. Except, in this case, it's a tacit reminder that Namco has slipped so far down the field that it's actually being lapped - by games we bought almost five years ago. Oh sod it: ARGH!
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It doesn't help that you're saddled with an inelegant control set-up that demands constant use of all four shoulder buttons at once.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nicholson Electroplating doesn't have time for that slow-burn organic process. It attempts a brute-force attack on greatness and comes up short.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The overall experience tends to favour the functional over the thrilling. It's adequate amusement for the price, perhaps, but still falls short of the gut-busting potential presented by online crazy golf.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While never terrible, Darkspore feels like it's had its heart surgically removed. All the components for a giddily stupid, aesthetically imaginative action RPG are here. Somehow, however, they combine into a shambling golem that knows its basic purpose, but not a whole lot else.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Some of the most touted improvements are distinctly underwhelming. The "detailed, story-driven, semi-dynamic campaign" turns out to be a poorly presented, poorly paced string of twenty-odd scenarios offering sod-all in the way of continuity or sense of progress.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    You're probably looking at a good thirty to forty hours of gameplay before you start to touch on the high-level possibilities of X2.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Even throwing in all the other games on the Razing Storm disc you're not looking at more than an afternoon's worth of entertainment here, and that makes it poor value for money.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    While there is some enjoyment to be had here, it is hard-won and rarely fulfilling. The imprecision of the combat and its lightweight feel combined with the ropey visuals conspire to date the game considerably.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    With a predictable storyline, childishly designed puzzles and some simply awful graphics, there is very little to haul this game from the clutches of Pantsville!