Fact Magazine (UK)'s Scores

  • Music
For 448 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 To Pimp A Butterfly
Lowest review score: 10 >Album Title Goes Here<
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 448
448 music reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like much of the best music of recent times, Colonial Patterns sits outside of chronology, peering fascinatedly in.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On paper Vapor City looked like Stewart’s descent into a sump of his own pompousness; in reality it’s anything but.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Old
    It’s an album that feels measured and well timed and yet avoids sounding over-polished or awkwardly stage-managed.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The result, unexpectedly, is his most ambitious record yet.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Only ‘The Seasons Won’t Change (And Neither Will You)’ feels slightly extraneous. Otherwise, Restless Idylls is all we might have hoped for in a Tropic Of Cancer LP.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The journey bounds from emotional high to low and back again: ecstasy and agony can both cause tearful eyes and heart palpitations.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Chance of Rain hinges on uncertainty and fluctuating pressure, not outpouring. It’s impersonal, then, but never inhuman.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Considering that Ferreira is a twenty-one-year-old major label pop artist exploring indie rock on a highly-anticipated debut, songs born of manifold frustration and uncertainty, Night Time, My Time is a defiant and assured listen.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Though a marginally lesser album than predecessor MAYA, Matangi is nevertheless dynamite.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Remember Your Black Day is about that feeling of grim portent, the cold fear that leaks in through your TV screen, the dread that hunts you down, even as you sprawl on a sun lounger and sip your cocktail and stare out at the sea.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As anyone who’s spent a night lurking by the subwoofers knows, these tracks have the power to rearrange internal organs. Uncomfortable though that may sound, it’s a pleasure to experience.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nun is easily the most focussed and incisive record Teengirl have released to date.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    When the whole thing drops back to its kickdrum-hi-hat backbone in the closing minute, it’s as stringent, and as satisfying, as any techno moment of recent times.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rap Album One breaks away from rap conventions in an effortless manner.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The hard-won fruits of this album have been worth it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Alternate/Endings is as bleak as it is imaginative, a drum ‘n’ bass opus from a producer who hasn’t quite turned his back on hip-hop.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These four tracks may cry out for proper soundsystems and bear many of dance music’s hallmarks, but their lengths (they add up to nearly half an hour), discordant layering and meandering structures render them more suited to body listening than the dancefloor.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This album is not just exciting for its sound, but for what it promises too.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Here’s an hour or so of music that’s cold as the cosmos and as unsentimental as physics, but something you can nonetheless gaze upon in awe.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Rather than the stunt-casting found in some dance-pop albums, the vocalists here exist intrinsically and organically in the songs, their vocals weaved into the fabric rather than simply wearing it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Ghettoville might chronicle a dark patch for Actress, but once it hits its stride it’s as good, and as full of life, as anything he has produced.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Yes, fine songs. But in part, though, a little of the success of July should be attributed to producer Randall Dunn.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In short, this album holds together even better than On a Mission, and Katy B is still our best pop star.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Herndon is quite unique, using her instrument to engage in a constant dialogue with her immediate environment in such a way that makes conventional divisions --between the natural and the synthetic, or between the everyday and the extraordinary--seem dated.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The album’s electronic feel sharpens the idea of sterility and a frictionless modern life, while providing, as British electronica has done since the days of John Foxx, a lexicon for existential nothingness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Boy
    This may be Carla Bozulich’s take on pop music, but Boy is rarely anything short of cathartic.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Love Letters proves to have all the pop addictivenss that Riviera did.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Say Yes To Love feels like a purging, 20-odd minutes of urgent expulsion that leaves you feeling exhausted, elated and renewed.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Unfidelity stands out as a keeper.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    More sweeping and grand than any of their previous records, the trio’s fourth LP is by far their most cinematic.