Film.com's Scores

  • Movies
For 1,504 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Happiness
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
1,504 movie reviews
  1. Nothing short of fascinating.
  2. The film is brisk, funny, smart, and artful, a strong pairing of high concept and relatable storylines.
  3. Post Tenebras Lux works so well because – even at its most random – it always feels like more of a single portrait of a man in crisis than it does an impish bouquet of provocative incidents.
  4. Captain America: The Winter Soldier neatly and entertainingly puts into motion some big changes in the Marvel universe, while still sticking to its own charms — no easy feat, but one fit for a hero.
  5. Teller manages a careful enough balance between painstaking technique and a larger cultural context over 80 brisk minutes to make even minor revelations feel like major moments.
  6. An instantly and enduringly compelling documentary.
  7. Gone Girl is a rare bird: a tricky, weird mystery that benefits from people knowing its twist from the outset.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 87 Critic Score
    A bold film anchored by Weigert's impressive lead performance.
  8. A knowing take on movies and maturity alike, The World’s End is just as thoroughly thoughtful as those which came before it, and maybe more than ever, you’ll find yourself laughing to keep from crying.
  9. [Brie Larson's] performance is something of a quiet revelation, and in turn, the same could be said of the film itself.
  10. The first half of “The Congress,” while still fascinating, does suffer a bit from keeping its focus on the gripes and accusations between Hollywood actors and producers...Once the Philip K. Dick-meets-”Inception” second half kicks in, the implications grow more universal.
  11. It is a shaggy dog road movie, and a drug-hazy one at that, but beneath the silliness and character-based gags, Crystal Fairy is, I feel, an unusually insightful look at self-imposed false identities and group dynamics.
  12. A masterfully queasy blend of dark humor and darker humanity.
  13. I recently heard someone describe Gloria as a midlife-crisis drama, which stunned me. In the most convenient terms, I guess that’s what it is. But what Lelio and Garcia pull off here is so delicate and sturdy that it defies such easy categorization.
  14. It transcends the usual biopic limitations to tell a specific story about some well-known people with larger, universal implications.
  15. Bluebird is undoubtedly a remarkable achievement, especially for a first-time filmmaker.
  16. Palo Alto is one of the best movies ever made about high school life in America (admittedly a low bar), blurring the lines between how unique it is to be a teenager, and how universal it is to feel like one.
  17. If the word “epic” has lost its meaning in the throes of recent summers, Man of Steel forcefully redefines it.
  18. Rush is one of those rare sports movies that’s compelling as both a drama and a spectacle.
  19. Among the stronger American horror films of the year.
  20. Uncharacteristically loose and deceptively frivolous, The Bling Ring is as much of an attack on The Hills Generation as any of Coppola’s previous films were an exercise in self-pity, which is to say not at all.
  21. A feral and staggeringly well-conceived revenge saga.
  22. The Past is just about as good as a relationship drama is ever going to get. The plot is teased out with deliberate grace, the performances are sublime and the revelations, even the most melodramatic, feel right and true. It’s big canvas stuff painted by a new master.
  23. Ejiofor’s tightly clenched conviction perfectly embodies hope and righteousness against all odds. He gives the best performance of his career to date, and what’s more, he gives “Slave” its bruised, beating heart with every scene.
  24. A well-polished production with a remarkable soundtrack.
  25. Bonello's decision to show rather than tell keeps the audience on its toes.
  26. Particular credit must be given to Samuel L. Jackson’s voicing of Whiplash and Paul Giamatti’s work on the voice of Chet. The chemistry between the two is awesome, hilarious even.
  27. The kid performances are impressive and the subtext of a region still shaking off the effects of a long-ended war gives seed to some much needed discussion.
  28. When Allen conceives of a character this great, it’s hard not to wish for him to slow down and maybe write that extra draft to refine his creation, but Blanchett – at once both repellant and eminently relatable – uses the casual tone to her advantage, the same way that monster movies use miniatures for scale.
  29. It’s all about the performances. McConaughey and Leto don’t just give voice to the disenfranchised of the 1980s, but all people suddenly faced with impossible challenges.

Top Trailers