Filter's Scores

  • Music
For 1,802 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 71% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 75
Highest review score: 96 I'm Wide Awake, It's Morning
Lowest review score: 10 Drum's Not Dead
Score distribution:
1,802 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    The electronic experiments introduced on Little Hells continue to bloom and her character building is peerless.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    It's an interesting curiosity, a peek into a developing band (that would clearly get much, much better and become comfortable rallying around their true heart: Berman).
    • 66 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    The record is more balanced, but that youthful spark is harder to find.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Two Gallants stand out from a sea of folksy mopesters thanks to their aggressive turns.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    there's an overwhelming sense of intimacy hanging over the album's 43 minutes, thanks to lyrics heavy on introspection and a sound served well by a new studio packed with vintage and analog gear.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Although Total Loss focuses on the deterioration of relationships over time, it's interesting that each track inverts that idea by flourishing with every second that passes.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Gibbard has better demonstrated his strength as one of the best songwriters of the last decade in the past, but ardent fans will appreciate the effort here.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    This record generally begs your wine-soaked attention on any winsome November night of your choosing.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Lux
    The music is nice enough, beautiful in parts, and will set a perfect mood for those who can slow down long enough to take it all in.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Although this may not be the band's greatest work, at least it's not a parody of what was. Soak that Positive Mental Attitude up.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Much like Bergsman's previous efforts, Other Worlds' vocals have a heavy-lidded quality that may turn off listeners who prefer a more forceful rhythm section.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    The 33-year-old Owens has funneled his usual druggy, droogy Flaming-Lips-stuffed-into-Beach-House tone into something cohesive and made it into Cali-folk popping and bright.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    It's a gritty trip from the barstool to the vaudeville stage...and just about everywhere in between.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Holy Fire isn’t a straight home run for the Oxford-based quintet.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Even though the record is part of a series, the Swedish duo--comprised of David Lehnberg and Elin Lindfors--travel through a full electronic arc within this album alone.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    One can make out here and there traces of American roots music, but those are alas, buried within the breathtaking bluster, ’cos ultimately, you can’t separate The Men from the noise.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Love From London is the newest of the prolific jangle-rocker’s solo endeavors, but he’s still not finished reinventing himself.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Julian Lynch’s music lacks the bombast of [Nino Rota’s] works, but is similarly raucous, mysterious and full of whirling joy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Themes of maturation again flow through, yet some tracks (“Jailbirds,” “Bottled Affection”) recognize the trade-off between freedom and insecurity of youth.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    The Knife’s sound and vision--and the members’ unrelenting oddness--seem to slightly buckle under the weight of their idealism.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    If you’re not bothered by the doom and gloom, Obsidian is just over 43 minutes of imaginative and spacious electro art--at times a bit jarring, but mostly beautiful.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    While part of this consistency is the cursive guitar work and snappy hooks that adorn many of the tracks, the fluidity within and between songs also plays a significant role. Rogue Wave have risen to the occasion.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    These post-punk/new-wave tracks rumble by with a forcefulness not heard since the ’80s. Soak up the gleaming destruction.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Though they may have felt immense pressure to replicate the monster hits that have come to be expected of them, the band have struck proper middle ground between the jaggedy, bluesy Southern rock of their early years with more polished commercial anthems.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Two songs from the EP made the cut for the album (“Ready For the Weekend” and, predictably, “I Love It”) and though the latter--a Charli XCX co-written club banger--still stands out high above the rest of the album’s tracks, the songs that comprise This Is...Icona Pop are even larger and louder than their predecessors.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Brian Oblivion’s knack for delivering ’60s and ’70s guitar riffs and singer Madeline Follin’s slender voice shine through the dissonance at the most unexpected and welcome moments.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Glacier is a journey.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Fade Away reminds us of how infectious Best Coast can be, and its short length ensures that we hold on. While Cosentino is still learning, listening to her music doesn’t get old.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    The result is Past Life, a chilling, straightforward album that is more concerned with soulful riffs, pulsing bass lines and soaring vocal melodies than grandiose, classical-inflected anthems.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Doom Abuse is a cathartic slap in the face from a band that sounds completely revitalized after its multi-year slumber.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    Sometimes going back to what works can be a crutch and creatively stifling, but for Rodrigo y Gabriela, it’s a welcome return.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    No matter how you look at it, tales of love and loss sound better when there’s a voice like Fields guiding you along.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    The resultant sound is crisp and lovely, and on a clear mission to please its other (the listener, maybe?).
    • 78 Metascore
    • 66 Critic Score
    “High Road,” “The Motherload,” “Asleep in the Deep” and “Halloween” are keepers, but they don’t quite put Sun in the same solar system as past albums.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Avant-garde impenetrability has been passed over for hallmark accessibility. [#11, p.92]
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    • 63 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Some of the most grandiose music this side of ELO. [#8, p.108]
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    • 52 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    The thread that made Weezer everyone's favorite nerd-rock quartet--the soul and core behind the dramatic guitar crescendos--has unraveled completely, leaving us with a record full of, well, a lot of dramatic guitar crescendos. [#16, p.87]
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    • 73 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    As assured as it is unfinished. [#21, p.95]
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    • 73 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Uncharacteristically lazy beats, chintzy instrumentation, ambiguous "sexy soul" vocalists and third-grade lyrics. [#22, p.96]
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    • 64 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    This is the musical equivalent of a Volvo wagon. [#22, p.102]
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    • 65 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    There are just too many frickin' snoozers. [#24, p.89]
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    • 71 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    If only there were tunes to back up the sounds, styles and references. [#25, p.92]
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    • 79 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Stainless Style is a head-scratcher that should heat up the club just fine. [Winter 2008, p.94]
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    • 61 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Don't assume every song on Fasciinatiion is schizophrenic, navel-gazing "why-are-we-here-and-what-does-it-mean" tome. [Summer 2008, p.91]
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    • 73 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Those of us disenchanted by genre specificity may give up on proVISIONS upon the line, "It was there in Galveston," and its accompanying played-out, imitive Western guitar line. [Fall 2008, p.97]
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    • 64 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Blackout Beach songs ultimately tremble in the sun of lyrical exactitude--abstractions are their safe house after raking flight. [Holiday 2008, p.92]
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    • 74 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    K'Naan is one of the realest cats going, and although Troubadour feels somewhat derivative, you should at least agree when he notes, "It's OK to feel good." [Holiday 2008, p.100]
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    • 67 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    It's unexpectedly novel...and predictably disjointed. [Spring 2009, p.92]
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    • 76 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    I'm Going Away is a decent road, but don't worry; you'll be able to put it dow. [Summer 2009, p.94]
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    • 75 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    The lyrics, not entirely in English, are a bit al dente and often overshadowed by the quartet's blend of jazz, blues and dub sounds. [Fall 2009, p.106]
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    • 63 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    By its very nature, the sonic range is reduced and the vocals sit tightly in the piano and acoustic guitar lines, as in "Blind Little Rain," where the vocal movement is as playful as it is devastating with Yuki's ghostly calling. [Holiday 2009, p. 92]
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    • 74 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Xiu Xiu’s Dear God has at least three memorable post-punk anthems, including album opener “Gray Death.” For the most part, though, the album is a series of challenges.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    While Tomorrow, In A year is a work of staggering scope, it is, to be honest, extrememly difficult and by some standards, unlistenable "music." [Winter 2010, p.96]
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    • 56 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Not every song here is successful, and as far as innovation goes, Grubbs isn't going to be driving the conversation, but he's put out a pleasing pop record that leaves listeners with no reason to absolutely despise the channel. [Winter 2010, p.99]
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    • 62 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Sadly, nearly half the songs on the album are bland, boring, and, quite unabashedly, one-dimensional.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Familial sits in one mood and stays there-it's unfortunately not one you would like to be in for very long.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Chad Elliot bends his elastic voice between teetering wails and delicate melodies, and sharp guitar work keeps the album charging, even with some sneaky jazz progressions thrown in.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    The Troy, New York-based Rowe's songs have an edge to them, albeit in an all-too-similar vein.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Particularly inspired by old '50s rock and roll like Little Richard and Fats Domino, the group does not disappoint its impulses, even if they're stuck on repeat.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    It's haunting in spots but ultimately fun; there's no sign of a sophomore slump for these guys.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Friendly Fires are still learning how to control their talents, but boy can they move.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Their first for Atlantic (and sixth overall) is a carefully crafted collection of 11 songs that don't stray from the band's alt-psychedelic formula, yet are a refreshing step forward.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Fool's Gold knot their songs up in Lewis Pesacov's elastic guitar, and when they let it go-as in the closing moments of "Bark & Bite"-everything unwinds into bliss.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    The music is alive with all the right synth-pop touchstones: lots of mournful, ersatz orchestration; creepy, disfigured melodic overlays; and muscular funk undercurrents.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    The result is a vibrant 13-song album that is overlaid with chanted lyrics that sometimes turn dull.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Fans may take a while to warm up to this new material, but turning down the volume isn't always a bad thing.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    As a follow-up to 2010's sinister compilation Delicacies, Unpatterns stands decidedly in a shadow.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    With earnest piano, pulsing atmospherics and windswept vocals opening the album, the title track signals what's to come and lets you know that, had there actually been a film, it would have certainly been a drama.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    2:54 falls short of being a truly great album because each song just starts to sound the same.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Songs like "Santa Cruz" make this album fallible--they aren't as beautiful as the place and memories evoked from the titles.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    This is not your usual carbon-copy victory-lap album--it's an ambitious boundary pusher.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    This collaboration produces a collection of consistent but familiar tunes that seem hastily thrown together, each instrumental and vocal decision decided by the fate of a coin toss.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Piramida's faults lie in the gaps. Each track stands on its own; they begin slow and end long, which isn't an issue until it becomes a pattern.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    [Thought there are] a few sweet moments on Sugaring Season--especially melancholic, piano-driven "Last Leaves of Autumn--it all feels a bit saccharine.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Permanently set on "saunter," these songs' clever structures are often overshadowed by their aw-shucks delivery.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    The vocal harmonies, synths and fancy banjo plucking are highlights on an album filled with enchanted imagery.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    When Love and Regret sounds both old and new, both insanely derivative and sometimes transcendent, you can probably guess the rest: great introduction to a band.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Sure, none of us can tell the past dozen or so GBV albums from one another. But we wouldn't trade any of 'em.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    If you're not a devoted fan, don't lose any sleep over missing this one.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    {Awayland} tends to feel without reason or necessity, as if thrown together more in effort to get something down than to say something that needed saying.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Ra Ra Riot devotees will also recognize this electronic turn. The change, although typical of seemingly every 21st-century band, is respectfully executed, retaining Ra Ra Riot’s unique style, making this third album far less superfluous than most indie-rock bands’ later efforts.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Whereas Widowspeak suffered a touch from homogeny, Almanac casts its entrancing firelight in a variety of attractive bearings.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Miracle Mile is fun, but the record’s sparse highs also lay bare its lows.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Each song is constructed carefully and intentionally, much like their album as a whole.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    All is quite slick. It’s a touch proggy and bitter, but not without the piquancy of sauerkraut.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    The songs possess an entrancing power but lack a certain amount of dynamism, the kind of tonal shift or chord change that sets your hairs on end, which is the hallmark of great pop music.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Balancing the intense with the delicate, BRMC’s Specter showcases the marvelous feat that music can bandage even the deepest of wounds.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Their first album in 23 years finds Bonney again waxing romantic and sardonic over lurching post-punk stormers and haunted spaghetti Western ballads.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    It’s the pounding of the skins that makes the album really pop.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Hands play the instruments that induce you to dance and hear those sounds that make you want to feel it all.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    It’s not perfect, but strong songwriting philosophy like this deserves to be noted and heard.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    What unifies the record is Beal’s ability to create concrete images within his abstract menagerie of sounds, which he then animates through his oddly charming and less paternal Screamin’ Jay Hawkins persona (also a good thing).
    • 63 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    While this carefully choreographed dance of feedback and vox is what made the post-punk wave so influential in the first place, Glow & Behold just misses the mark.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    The self-titled album is Maricich’s wobbly reboot after a seven-year absence, and if nothing else, she’s certainly learned the power of the bass.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Groundbreaking, this ain’t. But then again, are you trying to raze a barn or get your groove on? Album-specific flourishes don’t surprise.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    The heavy chords of the album-opening title track are a surprising jolt, yet maintain the same breezy Laurel Canyon harmonies for which the band later became known.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Fans of Animal Collective may enter the Slasher House and revel in Tare’s fun-sized treats, but others might be too disappointed by the tricks, remaining contented with the Haunted Graffiti next door.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 64 Critic Score
    Well aware now of what he likes to do with Hot Chip and what he likes to do eponymously, Taylor’s efforts here are enough to sate fans until the next solo project arrives.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 62 Critic Score
    It's not that the foursome have truly lost their claws--they're just keeping them retracted, the better to surprise you with as they lash out on tracks with the old vitriol. [#11, p.97]
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    • 73 Metascore
    • 62 Critic Score
    Doesn't offer enough lyrical depth to ensure the album's ultimate longevity. [#14, p.104]
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