Filter's Scores

  • Music
For 1,801 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 71% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 75
Highest review score: 96 Complete
Lowest review score: 10 Drum's Not Dead
Score distribution:
1801 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    What remains are incredibly sharp and distorted fist-pumpers, chock full of guitars and monstrous drums, and a handful of slower numbers that fall short of matching the impact of songs like 'Everlong' and 'Learn to Fly.'
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    From the propulsive 'What Would Wolves Do?' to the dub-styled 'Brace Yourself,' the album seems like something to play while driving across the desert at sunset, especially with all the wolf cries in the background from Islands’ Nicolas Thorburn.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Random Spirit Lover even crushes "Beast Moans" at points, its arrangements meatier and more satisfying, with an off-kilter Disney otherworldliness and kudzu-dense overlapping keyboards.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Instead of eight people trying to make many noises as possible, this is the sound of a unified band trying to make the best noise possible. [Winter 2008, p.90]
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    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Trouble in Dreams pulls upon 2006's "Rubies'" emotional strings, and in fact, tugs deeper while still retaining the strange wall of declamatory description. [Winter 2008, p.91]
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    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It is rare to come across a record that possesses such refinement and stylization, but The Seldom Seen Kid excels at both and was more than worth the wait. [Spring 2008, p.94]
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    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Naturally, there are moments that regress into mere riffs on the band's million-old forerunners, but attitude intermixes with ambiance on Nouns in a special, timeless way. [Spring 2008, p.99]
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    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For now, via tracks like 'High Noon' and 'Mother Nature,' they continue to ride high in the saddle on much the same sine waves they engineered in the previous millennium. [Summer 2008, p.100]
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    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With lyrics appropriated from an e.e. cummings poem of the same name ["Dying is Fine"] contrasting with bouncy guitar riffs, the creation feels fresh; the past, unforgetable. [Summer 2008, p.91]
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    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album serves as an excellent chart of the band's evolution. [Holiday 2008, p.91]
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    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Like Animal Collective, though, this is a challeging and often times terrifying music for those who don't yet speak the language. Trying Hartz, which collects tracks from each Danielson-related release up to 2004's "Brother Is To Son," works like a language lab for those who want to walk around in Smith's cities. [Holiday 2008, p.98]
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    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They arise triumphant with their own footprint in the soil of rock and roll. [Winter 2009, p.91]
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    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Perkins is joined by a three-piece ensemble of multi-instrumentalists that do a great deal to boost his soulful ballads with circus-like arrangements, while putting a little extra pep in his step. [Winter 2009, p.96]
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    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Like a Lynchian vision, it's darkly mysterious and disconsolate, but essentially human--and it's that sense of the persistence of humanity that lends this work its majesty. [Summer 2009, p.91]
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    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Bradford Cox's jagged, swirling atmospherics reach an apotheosis on this hazy but blissful offering.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With not a sound wasted, James Blake is everything we wanted James Blake to make.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's familiar but refreshing, evidence that a dinosaur genre like "post-rock" can still sound vital.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Though the sound can come off as aggressive, if not anxiety-inducing at times, it's the tiny revelations that make the vicious drumming, harsh guitars and freaky vocals worthwhile, summing up for an experience that is as delightfully fucked up as it is musically seamless...with unexpected steel drums making appearances in between.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For as much as this collection of songs feels like a band getting together to jam for fun, Break It also feels like one of the more cohesive albums in Bird's oeuvre.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Familiar yet thrilling, Blunderbuss is a masterful introduction to a man we've known all along.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Get Lost and stay lost.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Steven Ellison (aka Flying Lotus) manages to ensnare 18 night visions on his latest psych-bass masterwork, Until the Quiet Comes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    'Allelujah!'s symmetrical sequencing-two 20-minute suites, two 6-minute drones-is as stark and stout as anything the band have released to date, unflinching as it stares extreme horror dead in the eye.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Sound System drives home the foursome’s adeptness at boundary hopping, while never forgetting the value of a good hook and a politically righteous lyric.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Our six-string savior not only makes his guitar do things that will have you forgetting that Page and Plant are never to take to a stage together again; he is also keen to remind us in just whose hands now rests that Hammer of the Gods.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Critic Score
    Gorgeous. [#7, p.92]
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    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    May be one of their best. [#5, p.90]
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    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The best element... isn't the driving guitars or relentless percussion, it's the ability to step up and actually better their sound. [#5, p.91]
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    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Boroughs' greatest strength is its aural cohesiveness, fueled by a litany of Golden Age samples... and the heavy, often dark, bass-driven soundscapes. [#11, p.90]
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    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Her countrified songs often begin as gothic lullabies, swallowed up in darkness and longing, as if the instruments themselves were suffering heartbreak. [#6, p.82]
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