Four Fat Chicks' Scores

  • Games
For 209 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 69% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 31% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Game review score: 80
Highest review score: 100 Diamonds in the Rough
Lowest review score: 25 Mystery of the Druids
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 9 out of 209
209 game reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Simply stated, TOS is a mediocre puzzle game at best. It really is a shame because the designers came so close to crafting a game that would forever reside on your shelf with the classics.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Arkane's previous offering, Arx Fatalis, shares many general similarities but lacks Dark Messiah's energetic, if somewhat ill-fated, attempts to bring physics, stealth and a variety of combat options into the mix of a game that may not live up to all of its potential but still delivers the goods where they count.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If you're in the mood for a shooter with style, action, and lasting value, you're better off with “Serious Sam” than with XIII.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    If you like ancient Egypt, challenging puzzles with actual clues, and first-person exploration of fascinating environments, “Riddle of the Sphinx” is for you.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    Gamers the world over would thrill to play a soup-to-nuts remake of X-COM, updated with modern tech but otherwise essentially the same. In trying to mimic X-COM but also leverage original ideas, Altar's UFO series has succeeded only in highlighting its shortcomings - shortcomings particularly egregious in this disappointing installment.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Overall, Heretic Kingdoms is fun, fun, fun and destined to be a sleeper hit. The few niggles never really affected my enjoyment of the game. With its engaging story and completely different skill system, it's definitely worth your while to pick it up and play.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Atmosphere. Jonathan Boakes is a master at creating atmosphere. With lovely yet creepy visual settings, a story with secrets and ghosts, spine-tingling ambient sounds, The Lost Crown presents a tale sure to attract and basically please most adventure game players. But is a spooky atmosphere enough?
    • 71 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    I always appreciate it when a game treats its players as if they were intelligent adults, and Post Mortem does that in spades.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For the moment, Nosferatu is a terrific idea, beautifully realized, that is a just a patch or two away from greatness.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Trace Memory is a cracker-jack adventure game developed and beautifully suited for the DS system. It's not at the level and complexity of the best adventure titles for the PC, but it's not reasonable to expect that from a handheld title. What it does bring to the table is an engaging, wonderfully done and integrated story with facilitating puzzles.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Though it pains me to do it, the best rating I can give this, the 14th entry in the Nancy Drew series, is "average." It's a good-looking game with some enjoyable challenges, but the two stories it tells have nothing to do with each other, effectively denying players one of the basic satisfactions of mystery fiction.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    One of the best adventure games of 2004 and likely the best ever to deal with a futuristic, Orwellian theme of corruption and conspiracy. Story, dialogue, character development, settings, artwork, acting, and music are all superb.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Critic Score
    The simulation, viewed on its own, is quite compelling. Offered in a different context, its analytical depth would reward hours of study. Unfortunately, Traffic has framed it with all of the taste and restraint of a tatty traveling shooting gallery.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It is so much like Rhem 2 that it feels like the same game in a slightly different setting, which is exactly what it is. The faults I found grating but forgivable in Rhem 2 were magnified by their reappearance in Rhem 3. Some people won't see the lack of story and the ancient game engine as faults. Great news for them. But my time with Rhem 3 was split between interest and frustration.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    I would recommend this game for the good story line and the beautiful graphics, but if you want a game that has more adventuring, look for another.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As breathtaking as Clock Tower 3 is to look at, the gameplay is somewhat ... blah. I think it was the sameness of it all—find an item, return said item to its owner, watch incredibly gorgeous cutscene, meet up with mentally unbalanced mini-boss, destroy him/her ... lather, rinse, repeat.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The measure of a puzzle game is not, of course, how pretty it looks or how convincing it sounds. The measure is how well it plays. I am happy to report that Safecracker 2006 plays beautifully. There are some familiar puzzles, some unfamiliar puzzles, and some very clever twists on the whole idea of what constitutes a puzzle.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Initially, the game impresses with attractive settings, decent voice acting and the promise of a thoughtful mystery to be solved. Unfortunately, this becomes bogged down by static scenes, poor character movement control, obscure pixel-hunting and the wearying need to redo conversations.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's hard to envision a better first adventure game for a preteen person—girl or boy. The story is "safe," interesting, and in a wide-open western setting replete with legends, romance and novel characters.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Despite all my griping, Dark Fall really is an impressive first effort for the one-person design team and is actually better than some recent big-company releases. I'm not sorry I played it but neither am I gaga over it. How's that for decisiveness?
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    An exciting and diverse experience, easy on the beginner yet providing harder modes for the more experienced player.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    So often during the game, I wished for direct control of Lea instead of being saddled with this novel but frequently frustrating secondary approach. Instead of cluttering the monitor with multiple screens, let Lea do it herself!
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    And Then There Were None is, as the developers hoped, a "loving tribute" to the classic Agatha Christie novel on which it is based. With a sterling script, fascinating characters, superb voice acting, beautifully detailed graphics, and sensibly practical puzzles, it ranks among the best adventure games of the last couple of years.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    I will say this: those who love “X-Com” will like this game. Those who love strategy will like this game. But no one will ever love this game.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With an original concept and less cliché-mongering, we could be bearing witness to a rising star. For now, though, it flickers with dim promise on the horizon, catching our eye but not holding us long enough to do much more than raise a finger and point.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    But the fact is "X-Com" is twelve years old, and memory has a way of polishing off the burrs and nits that flaw a game, leaving you with only the hard candy shell of perfection. UFO: Aftershock cannot measure up any more than "UFO: Aftermath" did, but it hits a lot closer to the mark.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Seriously scary and atmospheric without being horrifying, more of an elegant Vincent Price scare than an 80s slasher movie. Think Goth Disney, and you've got the right idea.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Still, as I indicated above, Riddle is a nice little game (much less than 10 hours long) but not at a first-tier level. It's too short, too easy, and too lifeless. Like Secrets of Da Vinci (a better game), it emphasizes puzzles over people contact.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A fine game for the adult adventurer who enjoys dark spy novels and also is willing to tolerate a bit of "consolitis" in her/his gaming experience.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Runaway 2 improves on its predecessor in every way. It's bigger, more colorful, even more wacky. Locations and characters are outlandish, as is the storyline. Obscure puzzles and hot spots, as well as occasional repetitiveness, still plague this release. But I would still give The Dream of the Turtle a hearty recommendation, especially if you enjoyed "Runaway 1."