Hot Press' Scores

  • Music
For 497 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Live In London
Lowest review score: 10 Uncle Dysfunktional
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 24 out of 497
497 music reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Such inconsistency is forgivable on an overreaching debut, less so on a sixth album just 35 minutes in length.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    At times, Why Bother? is an unlistenable racket.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A perfectly functional album of loud guitars, ain’t life a bitch lyrics and the odd nod to different production styles and techniques.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Twelve is a solid enough collection, but one can’t help wondering if it would’ve been better had she made like Fellini and called it 8 1/2.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A number of tracks here follow a similar, frustrating formula. For three minutes they showcase Reznor’s worst tendencies; the boorish plod of the choruses, the hoarse moan of the vocals. On the remainder of each of these songs Reznor does what he’s good at – i.e. creating delicious layers of chaotic industrial noise.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s too early to write Maxïmo Park off, or to turf them into the ever-growing pile of indie also-rans. But they’ll need to pull out all the stops to recover their poise after this worrying misstep.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Although combining an assortment of sounds may seem risky, they’ve managed to produce a solid album, fusing jazz, soul, ‘60s rock ‘n’ roll and playful lyrics into a tight 10 tracks.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Nothing Bjork does is ever less than provocative... Just don’t expect to it to force you out of your seat.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The potency of the admirable sentiments is undermined by the lacklustre execution.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This is a maddeningly inconsistent collection, with more misses than hits – though Kelly’s best moments do go some way towards atoning for his flaws.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    You can slag them off all you like but it’s impossible to truly dislike their catchy, inoffensive pop-rock.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Shine is over-ripe with hokey Casio drum machines, soprano sax, and other things that nudge the tone towards easy listening.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Ian Brown’s fifth solo album is about the big issues. And while he's picked all the right targets, lyrically and musically it’s still a bit disappointing.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Necessary Evil is bereft of surprises and is pretty much as you would expect it to be.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Most of the record is--sonically-speaking, rather than in terms of quality--classic Ghostface, but only a couple of these familiar tracks match the standard set on previous records.
    • Hot Press
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A Guide To Love, Loss & Desperation is by no means a bad album, but at the same time it’s hard to see just what all the fuss is about.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This grand musical quest is often fruitless, and leaves this listener wondering what might have been, had the group demanded less of themselves.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Sprawling America travelogue stays strictly old school.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Vampire Weekend certainly have one of the best band names I’ve heard in ages, although their music unfortunately proves less exciting than one might have hoped.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Already dated, The Raveonettes 3-D thrills are temporarily diverting, but ultimately provide only the illusion of depth.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    This writer is a firm believer that every album you pick up should be a universally accessible experience. Solitude, sanctuary and silence spawn an exorcism of sorts.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Surprisingly agreeable return from the High Priestess of country kitsch.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    A million miles from thrash and punk, the twelve tracks here are an unusual mix of indie rock and country, with top class musicianship adding lots of depth and colour.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It’s not as nebulous as their last album--and it doesn’t deliver the melodic thrills of Last Splash--but Mountain Battles has personality, spirit, warmth and tenderness in abundance.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Bragg is taking stock. He’s now doing it for himself, at his own pace. Those in search of revelation from an old punk with a new perspective will be left hanging
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Accelerate is patchy at best, with only the blaring finale, ‘I’m Gonna DJ’, really catching the attention.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    You get the feeling that, in the long run, Diamond Hoo Ha is destined to be remembered as one of the lesser works in their canon.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Young Knives gamble away the ending to a solid album.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    These are early days, of course, but some worrying lapses into blustery Editors’ territory aside, Foals prove to be a tricksy, livewire prospect.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    If you pardon our French, Clinic’s fifth album is pretty fucked up--and yet it's also their best effort to date.