indieWIRE's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 991 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 72% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 26% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 12.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 74
Highest review score: 100 Me and Earl and the Dying Girl
Lowest review score: 0 Mother's Day
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 44 out of 991
991 movie reviews
  1. A stitched-together combo of outlaw energy and bittersweet romance that gives the impression of Little Rascals in the big city. Like the graffiti art it documents, it's a lovingly handmade affair.
  2. Whereas "45365" took the form of a scattered collage, with disconnected events and a vast ensemble of characters stitched together to represent a year of activity, Tchoupitalas brings greater clarity to a similarly diffuse canvas by situating it around a trio of innocent observers.
  3. An expertly crafted noir-like depiction of Chubbuck's descent into psychological duress, Campos' grim character study makes up for an occasionally stifling icy tone with a stunning lead performance by Hall.
  4. Upstream Color is routinely confusing but not oppressively so; its final exquisite moments explain little yet still manage to invite you in.
  5. Possibly the best war movie of the year.
  6. TransFatty Lives stands out less for its inherently emotional topic than the appealing personality at its center.
  7. Inherent Vice constantly teases at a complex meta commentary on the other movies it brings to mind, but never totally gets there.
  8. Mackenzie (whose previous credits include "Perfect Sense" and "Young Adam") applies a sharp kitchen sink realism to this haunting setting and directs it toward an ultimately moving family drama that just happens to involve vicious convicts.
  9. Despite its shortcomings, The World's End glistens with a comedic energy not present in equivalent mainstream blockbusters.
  10. This is horror filmmaking that's designed to work on you like a virus, slowly incapacitating your defenses so it can build up and do some real damage.
  11. Recently released from jail, Ai's full story remains to be told, but Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry competently summarizes his lasting relevance, regardless of what may happen next.
  12. Incredibly heartfelt to a large degree because of its cast.
  13. The contrast between the movie’s traditional execution and Stritch’s domineering powers create the lingering sense that she may be the project’s true auteur.
  14. Snazzily directed by J.J. Abrams with vibrant effects and a busy plot that sets the whole franchise in motion all over again, The Force Awakens delivers on expectations with a fun, polished space odyssey that embraces the appeal of the originals.
  15. As commercial entertainment, The Martian delivers on expectations of a "smart" blockbuster even as it adheres to the formula of a relatively simple feel-good drama. Though "Interstellar" aimed for more ambition, The Martian plays it safer: It's a brainy studio effort that sticks to familiar ground in more ways than one.
  16. Lyrically involving and deeply sensual, Neon Bull showcases a full-bodied artist in command of his form.
  17. Melancholia hovers in ambiguity with riveting aesthetic prowess.
  18. Slickly made if not particularly stylish, the movie maintains its entertainment value for picking ideal models of American excess.
  19. Director Jeff Feuerzeig tracks Albert’s bizarre scheme in her own words, constructing a fascinating treatise on creative desire, internal grievances and fame as compelling as anything the writer herself dreamed up.
  20. Love & Mercy is an engrossing portrait of Wilson's specific artistic inclinations, which draw from no real precedent.
  21. Serra's typically cerebral direction has a more vibrant quality due to the clarity of his images, though certain drawn-out sequences have an alienating effect on the drama. Still, Story of My Death manages to connect its profound aims with a devious atmosphere to match the turn of the century backdrop.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Critic Score
    With a solid execution of storytelling, combined with a powerful statement about how we perceive sex offenders, Pervert Park excels as a documentary that explores not only what it takes to be human, but also why psychological evaluations could be crucial in understanding the forces that bring human to commit crimes in the first place.
  22. I Wish embraces blissful ignorance, even celebrating its child characters' naivete.
  23. Going Clear delivers an efficient overview of Scientology's dark history with a cohesive focus on the precision of its corrupt motives.
  24. In each tense moment, Miss Bala has a lot to say in a few words.
  25. With the shift from conventional rock doc into something more sophisticated, As the Palaces Burn remains enthralling all the way through.
  26. Berberian Sound Studio constructs a perpetually strange, unseemly series of events overshadowed (and sometimes consumed by) the spooky movie-within-a-movie that hangs over every scene.
  27. Dunn plays around with perspective and style, but all the flash doesn't obscure the film's emotion and heart, which are deep and true.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The Pearl Button is a vivid, essential portal to understanding not only the heritage of a nation, but also the art of nonfiction cinema.
  28. Frammartino keeps the material engaging simply by aiming the camera at his subjects and letting the material organically emerge-rather than enforcing the supernatural element with overstatement.

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