L.A. Weekly's Scores

For 70 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 64% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 34% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 90 Everybody Got Their Something
Lowest review score: 10 Bridge
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 54 out of 70
  2. Negative: 6 out of 70
70 music reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Remedies some problems and amplifies others.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eitzel’s written with genuine warmth before, but it’s been several albums since he’s backed it with sounds that stand on their own this well.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sure, the songs are short, fast and catchy, but Clinic isn't filling prescriptions for ear candy; the music cuts into you with a desolate, sarcastic, scalpel-sharp edge.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    There’s more going on here than mere escapist fare.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The Moon and Antarctica is darker and colder than their previous stuff, but maintains the very particular blend of peculiar lyrics and uncompromising rock that consistently weaves through all their records.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If I were suddenly appointed Minister of Improving Music, my inaugural act would involve sending shock troops to ransack the CD racks of every would-be cookie-cutter punk in, say, Orange County, replacing all recordings by Social D. and Suicidal T. with copies of Dizzy Spells.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Equally comfortable in the realms of rock and dance, Holmes is hard to pin down stylistically; his latest album, Bow Down to the Exit Sign, like Moby's 1999 Play, draws from classic blues to add new life to electronic music.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The fly in the ointment is the lyric content, which plumbs depths of misanthropy that make labelmate Bill Callahan (Smog) sound like Bobby McFerrin.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    On Vanguard, the same basic formula is employed, only the emphasis is much more on reggae influences, and the experimentation with genre boundaries is considerably toned down. There’s still much that shines, however.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    For Solaris, Photek sticks to his signature style of clinical percussion etching a variety of danceable rhythms. Of the 11 tracks, only "Terminus," the disc?s opener, is truly jungle. The rest of the album features a technophile's gift bag of futuristic dance cuts... Most all of it's gorgeous stuff, and high praise is in order.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    It’s on the more open instrumental jam sessions -- "Dead Can Dance"'s pseudo-bossa tempos and especially the bluesy twang of "Highway to Heaven" -- that they distinguish themselves as live players eagerly retrofitting rock/dance hybrids.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Perverse as it may seem, this album is more tightly arranged and crisply recorded than anything the group managed on a major label; in fact, it’s a small masterpiece of home production, with Eno’s economical drumming framing stabs of rhythm guitar and precisely placed daubs of vibes and viola.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The clean-cut Stereophonics are the Black Crowes you could take home to your mom, only with stronger songs and without the high school histrionics.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Despite having gotten a bit too caught up in imitation rather than innovation, the trio have succeeded in making an album that's accessible without compromising their artistry.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Their sound is steeped in rare grooves, enhanced with hip-hop electronics and designed for lighthearted dancing. If the pair occasionally turn their rhythms on autopilot and rely on algorithm, you can't really hold it against 'em.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Iron Flag owes its lack of cohesion to some simply dull songs, plus the growing disparity in lyrical ability among the Wu’s members.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The resulting mélange doesn’t always work, but the songs on 10,000HZ Legend still succeed often enough to override the record’s occasional shortcomings.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    After three discs, Merritt's mesmerizing display of sustained inconsequentiality starts to seem like one of those Guinness Book of World Records stunts, impressive but pointless.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    His songs are beautiful if simple ballads to whatever crosses his fancy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Come With Us is too much of a mixed bag to induce a full-length journey; it’s best experienced in short walkabouts.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Hammering a shade softer, MDFMK daubs layers and layers of sophisticated balance -- all depth, no surface.... And the guitars and vintage synths, formerly sprayed on like aerosol cheese, now blend and complement each other -- like, you know, music.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Producer Ross Robinson (Korn, Deftones, Slipknot, etc.) brings a degree of alt-rock punch to the proceedings, but there's more than enough garage grit left in the grooves to keep the indie kids smirking. There's certainly some downtime on Relationship of Command, but when it hits you'll be smarting, and smiling.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Anchored by moody, mid-tempo songs enveloped in pop-washed trip-hop..... a stylish collection of well-tailored backdrops for Boyle's mournful soprano.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Music as kitschy, joyful and grand as it clearly intends, a tongue-in-cheek soundtrack to the James Bond movie we'd all like our lives to be.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Now, it’s the chilled tracks that seem limited and generic... The fortunate tradeoff is that the album’s three strobe-lit tracks definitely bring it on.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    I'm assuming the problems began when Rubin presented Cash with a cache of songs to choose from. From there, Rubin's production only makes a bad situation worse, putting Cash's dusty, reverbless voice -- which is beginning to show its frailties -- unnaturally in your face.... But if you can wade through the chaff, it's Cash's originals that save the disc.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Wyclef seems to reinvent himself for the worse on his sophomore effort. In place of his trademark iconoclasm, he delivers some good old-fashioned conformity in a bid to renew his street-credibility card... Thankfully, 'Clef strikes a balance with some outstanding selections, starting with the acoustically driven ballads "Diallo," "911" and "Something About Mary", which show that Wyclef armed with a guitar is still more powerful than an army of producers strapped with drum machines.... It's enough to make The Ecleftic a good but not grand album, one that finds Wyclef's vision falling short of his abilities.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    The group's lack of growth has begun to make their well-established talents wear thin.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It just isn't as much fun this time around, no matter how fresh Dre's beats are or how many worthy targets get shot down along with the innocent.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Chambers' voice is a birdie chirp. She's sexy, but has less edge than the tiniest bleached-blond in the Dixie Chicks and half the sass of Dolly Parton.