Los Angeles Times' Scores

For 1,331 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Illinois
Lowest review score: 25 Based on a T.R.U. Story
Score distribution:
1,331 music reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As a rock star side project, though, Dead by Sunrise has an unlikely fault--it's not nearly indulgent enough.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The weird aftertaste of Raditude isn't that Cuomo has so surrendered the oddball charm of his band's first two albums, though. It's that his late-career pursuit of mindless, opulent fun is so transparent that it almost taps a deeper vein of interior sadness than anything on "Pinkerton."
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Play On exhibits a distressing lack of dimension for a singer with Underwood's obvious abilities.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Boyle is perfectly comfortable singing actual hymns like 'Amazing Grace,' though her take on them is pretty much on a level with any local church's choir star. She's at her worst when she pushes harder; she doesn't know how to build drama, and her throat seems to constrict as she reaches for bigger notes.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    That spitfire spirit carries over into the most electrifying moments of Just Like You, a batch of tuff-girl tunes for the torn-fishnets set, but too much of it sounds impermanent, like so much Manic Panic rinsing down the drain.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Many of the same vices that plagued the first installment of "Shock Value" keep the second edition sodden as well: Tim's precise, micromanaged beats usually outshine his random collection of vocal collaborators.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Mudvayne has by and large returned to what it does best (or at least do frequently) on its new self-titled album.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If the style is intact, though, the songs here seem a bit lackluster; only the relatively jangly "Harmony Around My Table" and the Velvet Underground-ish "Peanuts" (think of O'Hara in Moe Tucker's role) really stand out from the tasteful mid-tempo blur.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The album is a pointedly minimal production, though -- most tracks are simple guitar-bass-drum affairs with a few tasteful harmonies that put the surprisingly durable hooks up front.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As impressively specific as those sonic ideas are, though, Deschanel's songwriting here is less distinctive than it was on "Volume One." Too many of the tracks bleed together in a well-appointed mush of major-minor melodies and hand-me-down lyrics about the inevitability of heartbreak.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Team-ups with Ian Astbury ("Ghost"), Chris Cornell ("Promise") and Wolfmother's Andrew Stockdale ("By the Sword") produce familiar sparks but die out quickly. And a ballad with Adam Levine of Maroon 5, "Gotten," aims for "November Rain" but ends up pretty soggy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Unfortunately, the slick, overproduced headbanger music feels anachronistic and wouldn’t seem out of place on a Korn album. While Cypress Hill remains one of the greatest groups of all time, “Rise Up” mostly flops.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Imagine Phil Mickelson in a round of putt-putt and you'll get a sense of what's on the line for Beck's first studio album in seven years.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The singer has no trouble making herself at home in these cuts, but the flimsy material can't quite conceal her hit-hungry desperation. Braxton fares better in the album's slower, more sensual songs.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Nearly every song overstays its welcome; what may have felt like a bunch of great jams in the studio grows tedious over the course of 12 tracks.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    With imagery haunted by death and lyrical allusions to alienation and angst, Avenged Sevenfold's fifth full-length is almost impossible to appreciate unless you fit the prime demographic: tormented teenage boys.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Klaxons, if you're going to shout in our ears a bunch, can you at least have something to say?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    As meticulously as these sounds and instruments are recorded, as beautiful and haunting as they sometimes sound, they don't add up to more than one or two truly memorable songs.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's unclear whether the creative languor stems from the inherent commercial pressure of being the Young Money meal ticket or whether Wayne has exhausted his ideas after compressing a career's worth of songs into three years.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Collins takes on 18 tracks in an outing as understandable as it is unnecessary, a high-priced karaoke spin for the ersatz prog-rock-percussionist-turned-master-of-the-'80s-pop-single.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    It's all familiar stuff - too familiar - to warrant sustained attention.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Consider it a musical Snuggie for tottering Valley party girls--it will feel marvelous in the cold, drunken and lonely hours of the night.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In glimpses it reaches that goal--like in maybe half of the sticky and finessed "Breaking Point"--but it's undone by the album's many other contradictory messages.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The King Is Dead clings so closely to formula that it doesn't sound like homage or even truth; it sounds like the studious but unconvincing work of an extremely gifted mimic.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    Despite all the work put into his workmanlike pop, it ultimately comes off as agreeable, but not memorable.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The downside is that along with heart and brains, Hollywood Undead has filtered out any sense of humor from its music, which makes American Tragedy virtually impossible to listen to for longer than a few songs at a time.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The characteristically festive result is generous to a fault: Collins triggers warm memories but leaves us with only a shallow sense of how precisely his four decades in the business have affected him as a man.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    The cussing, the horror, the anger, the disappointment, the alienation, the frustration, while real and scary and sad, gets tiresome. That's a lot of Tyler, and so much ego-maniacal nihilism, while fascinating and at times revolutionary, wears thin very quickly.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    All the songs are encased behind such stylish glass that it's hard to feel much of anything while listening to Destroyed, much less identification with the plight of the nomadic musician.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    If Gaga had only spent as much time on pushing musical boundaries as she has social ones, Born This Way would have been a lot more successful.