Los Angeles Times' Scores

For 1,352 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 71
Highest review score: 100 Speakerboxxx/The Love Below
Lowest review score: 25 Based on a T.R.U. Story
Score distribution:
1352 music reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    "Ruff Draft" is a rare solo affair that captures him in the midst of furious, creative burst and change in direction.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    If "Nightmare" misses some of the poetry and exhilaration of "Whatever," it has something more important: authenticity and integrity.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    "ADP" is often fun but sometimes overwrought, and non-fans may find it too much.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Revolutionary? Not really. But another strong turn.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Even as the music settles into some of the visionary Icelandic artist's familiar contours, she stirs in enough new ingredients to keep things moving.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The most musically direct and down to earth of the band's six-album career.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    As good as much of the new British rock can be, it is experiencing a creeping seriousness these days. "It's a Bit Complicated" is a welcome corrective.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Where Hester contributed rhythmic surprise and fleetness, Sherrod brings solidity and power that anchor the whole affair with a reassuring gravity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    A sound as sharp and renewable as anyone's in pop history.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Thanks to Clarke's well-developed tune sense and his bandmates' primal need for speed, We'll Live and Die in These Towns doesn't sound the way life in a cubicle feels; if anything, it replicates the adrenaline rush of one of those YouTube videos in which a stir-crazy office worker decimates a copy machine.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The collection offers a fresh take on England's druid-rock legacy, blending electronics with the elemental skin and seeds of drums and shakers in a sound that's both atmospheric and richly textured.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The bliss that does surface on Graduation is all in the grooves, which range further than West has ever gone before.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The songs are fairly compact and easy to follow. But they're far less easy to track and more interesting to live with than the work of most pop bards
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It's a portrait of an English radical at 62, but it's personal and emotional and neither strident nor stodgy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Here is a man unafraid to rep for the drippiest balladeer ever, Dan Fogelberg--and no one will call Edmonds on it, because his restraint and care eliminate any sense of the maudlin.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    100 Days, 100 Nights deserves every accolade it has and will receive.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The result is a sprawling, 75-minute immersion in the dynamic between Patterson Hood's Neil Young/Tom Petty-influenced folk and rock and Steve Cooley's mix of Rolling Stones, stone country and Band-flavored folk-rock.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Crow's progressive lyrics hit like rubber-band pings fired by some joker in the back row at school. No one is likely to sing her verses at a march on Washington. But by addressing serious issues in the language of pop, they remind us that political speech and casual breeze-shooting can and do often intersect.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Overall, the album's humor level is a little lower than usual for Davies, but the reflective songs are among his most intimate and touching.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The result is a collection of demanding, disquieting and beautiful urban hymns that reveal their rewards on repeated listenings.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    It's an unusually rich, solidly traditional country record with 17 songs, all written by Jackson, a first in his 18-year recording career.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Duffy's not a belter, but she boasts a cool power that is immensely aided by the cleverness of Rockferry's instrumental settings, which employ mostly acoustic instruments for a warmer sound that, in combination with Duffy's vocal prowess, stays sweet, soulful and satisfying.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Ayers' revealing account--his first album in 15 years--stands with his best '70s works of besotted, droll sophistication.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Though several doses of this languid, tension-filled music get a tad draining, taken altogether it is a suitable sound for our troubling times, and there's an invigorating mysteriousness.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Nouns showcases the appealing joy to No Age's process, the band attacking its music with relish and humor.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Bun B's second solo record is an impressive late-career triumph, one with a poignancy and resonance worthy of his dedication and devotion to the memory of his departed friend.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Featuring some of the Reverend's finest work in years, Green's latest is proof positive that as important as it is to show up, you still need to know how to lay it down.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Though it tails off toward the end, the second Weezer-Rubin collaboration (and the band's third self-titled album, out June 3) is a rush, starting with a sustained, four-song soliloquy on pop music's allure.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    The sound is more varied and lighter on its feet with touches of harpsichord and banjo but anchored by the Hold Steady's signature: thick, humid arena rock, a high-pressure system of cresting guitars and pianos that injects these dramas with tension and embraces all their contradictions and ambiguities.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Releasing another full-length effort less than a year later is unusual, but the accelerated pace might account for the infusion of freshness that makes Hymn and Her so arresting.