Los Angeles Times' Scores

For 1,817 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 42% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Normal Heart
Lowest review score: 0 Painkiller Jane: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 1015
  2. Negative: 0 out of 1015
1015 tv reviews
  1. Some will find it offensive, immoral, irresponsible--a highly defensible position. It's also very funny, a thing of twisted genius and, for the next eight weeks possibly the most original comedy on television.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The premiere is inordinately entertaining, and the follow-up episodes previewed equally so. [23 Jun 1994]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whereas MTV seemed to pick the first cast simply because they were cool and identifiable for young viewers, this time they've turned up the burner by choosing a gang of extroverts as different in style and ideology as humanly possible. [24 Jun 1993]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If not terribly revelatory about the youthful human condition, the series is better, and certainly more addictive, than it sounds. [21 May 1992]
    • Los Angeles Times
  2. It is astonishing to me that a television show that stars Rob Morrow, Sabrina Lloyd, David Krumholtz and Judd Hirsch, four of the most interesting and attractive and amusing actors television has ever beamed into a living room, would turn out to be a show that -- on the basis of its pilot, at least -- I would not ever care to watch again.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    "Mr. Show" offers up a mad world of silliness and satire that recalls the heyday of Monty Python. ... No convention is left untrammeled, no target left unskewered. And, perhaps most remarkable given the recent spate of less-than-hilarious sketch shows, hardly a moment of the show is left unfunny.
  3. In terms of pure, element-defying excitement, the show is no match for "Survivor," which took the cutthroat ethos of corporate America and stripped it down to its basest, most primal essence.
  4. The well-trod format of Siberia may be its biggest asset, quickly building the kind of sturdy perimeters that horror so often needs; real fear emerges when the familiar and predictable become shockingly distorted (is any ghost as scary as a child ghost?).
  5. A few caricatures stick out among the characters, but the subtler conceptions, on the page and in performance, win out.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This compelling storyline could make the tale of battling basketball brothers a keeper for the WB. [23 Sept 2003, p.E11]
    • Los Angeles Times
  6. Quantum Leap for the most part is so excruciatingly slow and laborious that you wonder if director David Hemmings was trapped in his own time warp. Yet Bakula does nicely, and the story ultimately accelerates and even yields some very affecting moments as Beckett intrudes on his own past. [25 Mar 1989, p.C6]
    • Los Angeles Times
  7. A ZIP code for stereotypes and stock characters, Beverly Hills, 92010 is nothing if not predictable, with the twins each facing moral choices and ultimately doing the right thing, presumably because they're from Minneapolis. [4 Oct 1990, p.F11]
    • Los Angeles Times
  8. The scripts are one-line oriented and sometimes an ugly howl, and the central characters are perfectly cast. The growly O'Neill and Sagal -- who has a terrific mincing walk that she may have picked up from her days as one of Bette Midler's Harlettes -- were born to insult and perform bowling-ball humor. [4 Apr 1987, p.C1]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Looks like a fun ride, a crime drama with more laughs than gun battles. [31 Jan 1995]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Despite very likable characters, deft acting and the psychological twist, the rest of Monk appears to be pretty standard issue. [12 July 2002, p.34]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    Fast and furious with the exposition and Sci-Fi-losophy 101 expostulation, it may be the briskest two-hour TV pilot on record.
  9. The new cast is fine (Stewart is a very interesting actor) and the story, although not very deep, inspired or mind-melding, has a nice payoff. But getting there takes much too long. ... Although handsome, this is a slow, thudding two hours badly in need of energizing.
  10. Blatantly designed to tickle the funny bones of teenage boys and those who think like them, the show delivers plenty of lowbrow laughs, at the same time indulging in excesses seemingly calculated to shock the sensibilities of TV watchdogs. [13 Aug 1997]
    • Los Angeles Times
  11. It would be great to report here that Devious Maids is not that bad, except that it is, despite a lot of real talent on-screen.
  12. The cast seems no better, or worse, than any reality TV assemblage, but the clues are delivered to the group in such a way that much of the pilot is spent watching them troop, mostly en masse, from one room to the other. It's not terribly exciting.
  13. Though constructed from off-the-rack tropes and predictable dialogue, the show also keeps moving forward, causing its characters enough trouble that you feel compelled to stick around at least to see how they get out of it.
  14. Every pilot is burdened with establishing character, jump-starting the narrative and hooking the audience, but Under the Dome unnecessarily force-feeds us its first hour to its own detriment.... Which isn't to say Under the Dome won't wind up being fun to watch. All of the performances seem promising.
  15. "Project Runway" treats the contestants, the majority of whom are either from New York or Los Angeles and in their 20s, with an air of contempt and condescension. [30 Nov 2004]
    • Los Angeles Times
  16. Nourished by clever writing, the comic delivery of Allen and the earthy freshness of Richardson, "Home Improvement" is funny enough in spots to make you laugh out loud.
  17. The real miracle here is how deftly the show avoids the soggy cliches of redemption so many of its forerunners have embraced. [26 Sept 2003, p.E1]
    • Los Angeles Times
  18. Demonstrates how funny writing and good execution can supersede a hackneyed series concept. [21 Sept 1998, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
  19. It's "Desperate Housewives" all over again -- the whodunit overlaid by a titillating comedy of shame-based suburban manners and shame-based depravity, the word "bitch" used scandalously. [24 Sep 2006]
    • Los Angeles Times
  20. It delivers mixed signals. Because the language is elevated, the production assured and the acting fine, it can feel that something important is happening. But perhaps there is less here than meets the eye; maybe it's just a tricked-up mystery show. It comes on like satire, but it's too scattershot, too inconsistent, too over the top to make any significant points.
  21. None of Undeclared feels forced, and it helps enormously that the cast looks like it belongs, the actors fitting their environment perfectly. [25 Sept 2001, p.C6]
    • Los Angeles Times
  22. This split-personality series that speaks with two voices: one thoughtful and intelligent, the louder one glib and derivative. [29 Sept 1999, p.F6]
    • Los Angeles Times

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