Los Angeles Times' Scores

For 1,704 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Lady Dynamite: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Cavemen: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 939
  2. Negative: 0 out of 939
939 tv reviews
  1. I can't say I have completely made up my mind myself, though on balance I'm more yea than nay, and the series' intelligent dopiness is something of a going style in comedy. Certain things do strike me odd.
  2. It's a grand if inconsistent experiment that, from the moment it opens with a definition of magic realism, wears its considerable ambitions on its sleeve.
  3. Once again written by Pamela K. Long and directed by Stephen Herek, it's not quite up to the mark of its predecessor, whose strengths were in ordinary domestic relations and challenges--a Smoky Mountains "Waltons."
  4. In theory, Southland could turn out to be a rich and textured cross between, say, "Hill Street Blues" and "Crash" with a little "Training Day" on the side, but the pilot, for all its horrific crimes and grimy street scenes, is strangely bland.
  5. It is a sometimes clever, just as often clichéd mix of dystopian tropes, with performances ranging from nicely modulated to almost over the top, and some sly design that, along with some twisted PSAs, also accounts for most of the story’s humor. It is quite watchable and nothing special.
  6. It is buried in whimsicality and paeans to "feeling" and leaping into the void. And the stars do feel out of sync. (Williams is more comfortable riffing with James Wolk--"Mad Men's" Bob Benson--as... some other guy who works there.) We will give it some time.
  7. A light dusting of Milton notwithstanding, its pitch is mainstream and middlebrow. A decently made series that is neither particularly original nor entirely predictable.
  8. This is only an average situation comedy, but even the great ones have worn that makeup.
  9. [Remini] comes off as authentic, even if Scientology and the Aftermath can also seem self-serving.
  10. While much of it is silly, corny or clichéd and relies more on easy effects — the power ballad, the overwrought sex scene — than on the subtle explorations of people and place that the pilot seems to promise, the series is, on the whole, highly digestible summer fun.
  11. I can't say the pilot struck me as especially funny, but there are good things and talented people in it, and it looks good.
  12. The show fulfills its mission: It is an industrial entertainment, a candy-colored machine to snare budding consumers who (once again) are not being served so much as being served up.
  13. The celebration and surrender are enough to put the viewer in a vicarious good mood, no matter how unconvincing its context.
  14. The show... doesn't seem to be aiming for anything higher than a comfortable middle ground, bypassing a chance to watch Goldblum send up our preconceived idea of Goldblum.
  15. Bogged down at times by moody re-creations (often unforgivably accompanied by the strains of a muted trumpet) and endless footage of Bin Laden, Manhunt is not a definitive telling either. Indeed, its strength lies in its awareness that there is no way to completely tell this particular story.
  16. A cynic might think Twisted is a bald attempt to capitalize on the success of "Pretty Little Liars" while possibly adding a Y chromosome to the mix. The non-cynic might see in Danny yet another metaphor for the alienation and "otherness" many teens feel.
  17. With any luck, subsequent episodes will find a sharper, cleaner stride. All the elements are there, it's just the alchemy that seems a bit off.
  18. Some of the best shows on television are character-driven procedurals, but Borenstein seems so eager to establish the procedural that he underplays the characters.
  19. If the Awful Truth of the Global Meltdown is the big carrot "Jericho" dangles before you, it is no more compelling than the question of which of the available good-looking girls Ulrich is going to get close to.
  20. It's a comic book, basically, a B-movie, a pulp fiction, and low enough in the cultural reckoning of things to set its own rules with impunity.... Part of the pleasure of the series is that particular pleasure of watching a super-heroic character who can't fail.
  21. It isn't until the glimmer of a plot finally emerges, after Todd stumbles into a Middle Eastern market with a can of Thunder Muscle, eliciting sudden mysterious interest--that the series inches past mere mockery to the promise of more muscular misadventure.
  22. It is something less than magical, but it's pleasant and pretty and easy to watch.
  23. James and Lathan are appealing--you could build a decent episodic series around his by-the-book rookie and her hard-as-nails veteran quite easily--and while Shots Fired lumbers as an issue drama, it’s diverting enough as a cop show.
  24. An aura of staginess, of manufactured drama and strenuous comedy, surrounds the show and works into its every cranny and nook. As a result, one never feels that the pair are in even as much danger as they're actually in. Yet it is not without charm; indeed, its appeal is in its pretense.
  25. Not surprisingly, given the scope of the show, some topics are nailed brilliantly--Chanel, the airport security agent, is perhaps among the greatest TV characters in recent history, and the adoption of an American child by an African actress is equally hilarious--while others, like local newscaster Alvarez or the pregnant senior citizen, are flat and trite or flat and weird.
  26. If hardly a moment feels plausible, the show has energy to spare and so many balls in the air by the end of the pilot that it's hard not to want to see where they will come down.
  27. It works best at its most intimate, as family drama, and as another variant on "The Real World," in which people who would not ordinarily live together are made to do so.
  28. It's the fabulous shamelessness, the awful and yet admirable brilliance of the thing. Whether Palin will ever run for office or not, Sarah Palin's Alaska sets a new standard for political ads.
    • Los Angeles Times
  29. Wootton is a quick-minded, thematically consistent improviser who thoroughly knows his characters, and obviously something of a daredevil: You can get hurt doing this stuff, or arrested. But as in Baron Cohen's comedies, the cleverness of the star is too much the point.
  30. It's rather old-fashioned, except that there's something real about the chemistry.

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