Los Angeles Times' Scores

For 8,424 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Tale of The Princess Kaguya
Lowest review score: 0 Eating Out: All You Can Eat
Score distribution:
8,424 movie reviews
  1. Outdoes recent releases such as "Boogeyman" in the fright department, but the "Dawson's Creek" sensitivity and unsatisfying effects undermine the lupine anxiety.
  2. It's difficult, though, to see how this picture -- essentially chronicling a long car trip -- could mean much to anyone but the Wagners and their friends and relatives.
  3. It shouldn't be surprising, but some of these directors are more interesting than their work. French director Breillat, never a personal favorite, is an absolutely hypnotic speaker who holds the screen the way her films rarely have.
  4. Instead of a cautionary tale, they've looked at Flynn's life through rose-colored glasses.
  5. For the most part, it's an uneven if amiable and occasionally inspired comedy about getting through adolescence that hits some false notes along the way.
  6. Good stuff comes when bad stuff happens; that's when some of the movie animation prowess kicks into high gear. But too many of the "solutions" the guys concoct are so impossibly complex or just downright ridiculous — puppetry comes to mind — that like the continents, it's a little too easy to drift away.
  7. Constant shifts between past and present and between individual stories creates varying perspectives that add dimension and insight to material that might play tritely if presented in straightforward narrative form.
  8. This story of an East L.A. Latina determined to follow in her father's footsteps to the boxing ring does pack a punch.
  9. Anyone looking for the kind of comic brio that Dustin Hoffman and company brought to "Tootsie" will not find it here. [24 Nov 1993 Pg. F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
  10. If you are in touch with your inner 14-year-old child, you could do worse.
  11. A film that would have been more potent had it been a 40-minute short rather than a feature-length proposition.
  12. Unfortunately, "Blood and Honey" has script problems: Its core story is less compelling than its overall atmosphere.
  13. Shame as well upon the advance marketing department for blowing the end of the movie in ads, thus exorcising any ghost of a chance Quarantine had of issuing a surprise.
  14. Moll's restraint gives way to a tastefully overwrought checklist of Gothic imagery. In the cloistered shadows and the harsh Castilian sun, the visuals are handsome, even as the movie threatens to tip into parody.
  15. A threadbare comedy glomming onto the ample talent of its star, Will Ferrell.
  16. The city's skyline is blown to bits. Burning, broken, blackened bits. So if that's what you're in the mood for, that is what the film delivers, endlessly, but in that cheesy-campy way that can make a bad movie good fun.
  17. Strictly for fans only.
  18. Not all it might have been, an oddly old-fashioned film from a director who's usually anything but.
  19. Sometimes the facts can get in the way of the drama, and that's the central problem here. That sense of needing to be true to the record is reflected in an overwhelmed screenplay.
  20. Dazzling in its possibilities, but the holiday message of the 37-minute Santa vs. the Snowman leaves a lot to be desired.
  21. Gorgeously shot, smartly conceived, cleverly cast, badly executed - the lush medieval beauty here is at best only skin deep.
  22. FD 5 did not raise even a single goose bump - which for a movie that bills itself as horror is not a good thing. The camp factor, however, is high and makes the 95 minutes pretty much fly by.
  23. In the end, LaBute's remake is an interesting idea that never transforms into a particularly satisfying movie.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    In a movie where the timing of a squeeze bunt is presented as the thing of beauty that it is, and the eradication of small-town culture in a changing world is a genuine concern, the simplifying countrified morality of The Final Season is the real crying shame.
  24. Because Senesh died so young, it's hard to fill out a film of nearly 90 minutes that claims her as the subject, so director Grossman has resorted to using newsreel footage as well as re-creations, which, though discreet, add nothing special to the proceedings.
  25. What Ed Neumeier's script provides instead is a cheerfully lobotomized, always watchable experience that has the simple-mindedness of a live-action comic book, with no words spoken that wouldn't be right at home in a funny paper dialogue balloon. Not just one comic book either, but an improbable and delirious combination of "Weird Science," "Betty and Veronica" and "Sgt. Rock and His Howling Commandos."
  26. A frustrating mix of smart flash and smirking impudence.
  27. Passable in its efficiency, Fired Up! is less offensive than it might have been while also managing to be staggeringly uninspired.
  28. Not everyone, for sure, is going to be able or willing to go the distance in this ambitious but exceedingly offbeat epic, which is great-looking and has a sweeping romantic score by Hartley himself.
  29. A Walk Among the Tombstones is the creepiest film I've seen in quite some time, and that's not meant as a compliment.

Top Trailers