Los Angeles Times' Scores

For 1,718 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 2.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Returned: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Stalker: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 949
  2. Negative: 0 out of 949
949 tv reviews
  1. Jefferies' comedy is by turn smart, obvious, thoughtful and irritating, and quite as much may be said of his series--though his stage demeanor (loud, brash and in control) is softened considerably here by dint of his being a character living among other characters.
  2. A still pointed but more controlled take on the crossroads of media and culture, The Newsroom is now much closer to the show that many hoped it would be.
  3. "Top Chef" seems like a no-brainer, an extension both of the interactivity of TV cooking and the art-and-craft side of reality shows, in which people are actually making things as opposed to just asses of themselves.
  4. It benefits immensely from the presence of Braugher, at long last in a role that, like that of Det. Frank Pembleton on "Homicide: Life on the Street," suits his particular intensity.
  5. There are moments that require you not to think too hard, and some of the black humor doesn't overcome its fundamental nastiness. But on the whole, it's a superior package, intelligently constructed and handsomely executed.
  6. Is it good? Sure it is. Does it better its predecessor? Your cherished memories aside, that is a bar set low. So, yes, it does better them--by quite a lot and, at the same time significantly, not by too much. That is to say, for all its improvements in form and content, it has not sacrificed fundamental candy-colored cheesiness for fashionable dark modernity.
  7. It has a kind of sunny charm, a premise fit for a novel, and is built upon a pair of strong female leads, a rare enough thing in sitcoms. Poehler and Jones have a nice, contrapuntal rhythm. I stamp this show: approved.
  8. Like the women in it, the show is solid and professional and holds together well.
  9. Although predictable in predictable ways, there are enough twists and turns and, relatively speaking, complexities of character to keep things interesting, and a pivot at the end that I did not see coming. Which bodes well.
  10. Clearly flung at the Spike's male demo–-"Get More Action" is the network tagline, which implies a viewership not getting as much as it would like--it has a slightly sour edge that some will just read as The Way Things Are.
  11. Blatantly designed to tickle the funny bones of teenage boys and those who think like them, the show delivers plenty of lowbrow laughs, at the same time indulging in excesses seemingly calculated to shock the sensibilities of TV watchdogs. [13 Aug 1997]
    • Los Angeles Times
  12. The cast is excellent, and there's potential here, even though tonight's opening episode, as pilots will, tries a little too hard.
  13. Acting in his first television project, the Oscar winner portrays Madoff as an emotion-free money machine, taking advantage where he can, easily convincing himself that the people he’s bilking are aware of the game he’s playing, making them willing participants in their own downfall.
  14. The pilot works a little hard--not one but two characters get catchphrases, which happily evaporate by the second episode--but plenty of good things come out in the effort, and better things seem likely to come.
  15. It's all completely absurd, of course, but smoothly so —"The Da Vinci Code" meets "Alias."
  16. The mechanics of the cases (again, par for the genre) might squeak or grind here or there, but Backstrom really stumbles only when it strains too hard for seriousness--and it is not a fatal fall, in any case.
  17. The premiere felt a little tense; the host is still learning how to relate to the camera, how to occupy television. Nevertheless, he proves a friendly presence.
  18. As holiday gifts go, Telenovela, starring Eva Longoria as a Miami-based soap star, is a happy one: appealing, sweet, witty, traditional in its bones, modern in its complexion.
  19. It's just as ridiculous as it sounds, chockablock with clichés, predictable exposition (two taps of the keyboard and entire histories are revealed) and some fairly whacked-out plot twists. But it doesn't matter because Orphan Black isn't so much about plot as it is performance, and as the series continues, the performances are pretty astonishing.
  20. Highly watchable. ... The show, an obvious riff on "Desperate Housewives" and "Laguna Beach: The Real OC," is less glossily executed than those but also, for all this, trashier and more believably grotesque. [21 Mar 2006]
    • Los Angeles Times
  21. Its pleasures are simple and familiar. There is the usual mix of boastful losers and shy winners, of tiresome cutting remarks and delightful delighted approval.
  22. The Address is ragged and homely; it feels homemade, even amateurish at times.... But it is full of life and feeling; its rawness suits the subject, and helps rather than hinders Burns' cause.
  23. Each episode is supposed to represent 22 minutes in Ellie's life. That's nice, but an ever-present clock on the side of the screen is a gimmick that should be dropped. Otherwise, this show has a very nice comfort level. Best of all, it feels fresh.
  24. Unlike "Teen Wolf," MTV's other new monster show, Death Valley does not take itself too seriously or seriously at all - everyone involved seems to be having a good time, and as a result so do we.
  25. The series is sassier than the book.... Moving pictures require something different; messianic folderol is best served there with a little sex, and a little seltzer. That has been provided.
  26. If nothing here screams New Dylan or Next Gaga, or bids in any way to rival the best of "Runway" or "Chef," the craft-under-pressure and problem-solving elements work as before. It's amazing what people can do in a day.
  27. While supercool science may be the hook, the real draw of Eleventh Hour is Sewell.
  28. Mainly it's sort of gentle and nice...Do viewers want gentle and nice? That's to be determined. In any case, call "Madigan Men" promising. [6 Oct 2000, p.F28]
    • Los Angeles Times
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Ghastly, grisly and yet pruriently gripping.
  29. With a little tweaking, the series just as easily could be set in some large corporation, or on a college campus, and engage most of the same interpersonal issues — what women do for men and for one another.

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