Los Angeles Times' Scores

For 1,293 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 43% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Behind the Candelabra
Lowest review score: 0 Stalker: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 682
  2. Negative: 0 out of 682
682 tv reviews
  1. At once more modest and more ambitious than its predecessor; more focused on detail and yet more expansive. It is also excruciatingly funny, with an emphasis on excruciating.
  2. [Writer/director/voice of Cleric] Steve Purcell's comic timing is splendid, as is his staging of the action scenes.
  3. The play, and the production, might have been better served by rolling a few cameras into the theater, but I know that isn't how people like to do these things.
  4. The film as a whole is a strange case of mostly excellent parts that make an overlong and tedious whole.
  5. This time around everyone, Byrne in particular, moves with an air of confidence that allows you to keep your eyes on the knives being juggled in the air rather than the person doing the juggling. Which is exactly where you want the audience's eyes to be when you're pulling off a con, or a show like Damages.
  6. It's a conclusion that seemed to me both contrived and honest, if that makes any sense, and it left me disturbed, though not, as Doctor Who often has, a sobbing wreck.
  7. An amusing, highly promising light drama from the WB about mother-daughter bonding that is tender, warm and loving in a natural way without heaping on the schmaltz. [4 Oct 2000, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
  8. What makes it so engaging is not that the series finds anything new to twist, but that it works so well with and within the strictures of the well-thumbed genres it combines in equal parts: spy thriller, murder mystery, backstage drama, triangular romance.
  9. The first episode may be a bit rocky in the beginning, what with the reintroduction of characters and story lines, but the second season of Damages promises to be even better than the first.
  10. Unlike many series--especially cable series--and despite the propensity of some family members to take undue advantage of Cam's new good fortune, the show is not broadly cynical about people or institutions, which makes it easy to like, despite its sometimes wobbly tone and occasional clumsy construction.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Bell does such a good job playing the world-weary Veronica that she manages to get away with voice-over lines like "I'm no longer that girl" and "The detective in me knew something was wrong" without sounding silly. She channels the charisma, smarts and frustration of Angela Chase, Claire Danes' character in "My So-Called Life." [22 Sept 2004, p.E12]
    • Los Angeles Times
  11. You will laugh, you will cry and if it seems a bit treacly, it is.
  12. More a sketch than a thorough retelling--though still recommended as such--and as balanced as you can be about the scandal given the facts, the film begins at the end, or just before it, with the remarkable, once much-bootlegged footage of Nixon preparing to resign.
  13. It's the miraculous simplicity of creating something from nothing that makes Runway endlessly watchable.
  14. Artistically, it may be an unnecessary appendix, but I'm not complaining. More pie? I will make room somehow.
  15. Funny and wickedly weird.
  16. Fine character actors abound, playing people on the rural edges, but it's the main character and Olyphant's performance that lift the sometimes labored plot lines and carry them over the finish line.
  17. Generation Kill tends to play as a series of discrete events. I suppose an argument might be made that this mirrors the way that the constant threat of extinction, and subject always to a sudden change in (rarely explained) orders, makes one live in the moment. I don't think that was what the producers intended, but it works well enough for watching it.
  18. Easily the the best, cleverest and nuttiest arrival of the 1989-90 season is The Simpsons...It's very small-scale, but perfectly conceived and executed. What we have here from creator Matt Groening is a rare confluence -- delightful writing, pictures and voices fitting like a Matisse. [12 Jan 1990, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
  19. Deadwood is engrossing, refreshingly well written and oddly relevant. [15 Mar 2004, p.E1]
    • Los Angeles Times
  20. Deliciously funny satirical gore. [10 Mar 1997, p.F1]
    • Los Angeles Times
  21. It's one of the best things to come out of the fall season, but as a recreational television watcher, I like it too.
  22. The strength of the series lies not in the whodunit elements--it isn't hard to work out who's behind it, even if it isn't immediately apparent why--but in its eye for local details and small human gestures.
  23. Apart from a surfeit of split screen effects and some overbearing soundtrack selections, I have no quarrel with this series at all, and wore a lump in my throat through much of it.
  24. It is a suitably complicated and pictorially engaging work of period suburban mystery, with a large cast of characters
  25. Beyond the emotional pull of the individual stories, Get to Work breaks down a certain us/them barrier, showing with painful clarity the holes left by the absence of family structure and education.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The cast is fine and Steve Miner directs with sensitivity. There's real poignancy in the last scene between Savage and McKellar. It's a refreshingly gutsy half-hour, a look back at how things were -- and weren't. [31 Jan 1988, p.C-13]
    • Los Angeles Times
  26. Rick Beyer's fascinating, detailed and oddly delightful account of the World War II military camouflage artists whose job was not to hide men and materiel but to create battalions where none actually existed, drawing German eyes and ears to the wrong place.
  27. This is a rare TV union where cast, writers and directors appear to be of a single comedic mind; the humorous results speak for themselves. [7 July 1990, p.F11]
    • Los Angeles Times
  28. When death no longer holds the dread it once did, what's left is the fear of what life can become. And that is the boogeyman with which the characters must now wrestle.

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