Miami Herald's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 2,916 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 WALL-E
Lowest review score: 0 The Watcher
Score distribution:
2,916 movie reviews
  1. If "The Sixth Sense" was Shyamalan's take on ghost stories and "Unbreakable" his ode to comic books, then Signs is the evil cousin to Steven Spielberg's "Close Encounters of the Third Kind."
  2. One frenetic movie that doesn't know when to quit -- and leaves you wishing it could go on forever.
    • Miami Herald
  3. Impossible to resist.
  4. One thing that strikes you as you watch Shanghai Ghetto is how little mingling there was between the Chinese and the Jews.
  5. The movie isn't just hilarious: It's witty and inventive, too, and in hindsight, it isn't even all that dumb.
  6. Unabashedly frank in its depiction of sex -- too frank, probably, for more discreet viewers -- but it's never exploitive or seedy.
  7. Gripping, made more intense by the knowledge that all is true.
  8. It is a riveting and memorable performance and Kingsley finds subtlety in Logan where there doesn't seem to be any.
  9. The summer movie season has barely begun, and already we have its first big surprise.
  10. So deliciously absorbing and well done.
  11. Never shies from acknowledging the natural fascination with their abnormalities.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Thanks to myriad animators, the characters cavort, laugh and struggle against stunning backdrops, from lush jungles to cascading waterfalls. Groovy? Absolutely.
    • Miami Herald
  12. As film noirs go, this one is a classic.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    What makes this sequel work is the charm of its story.
  13. It just requires an open mind, a love of film and a willingness to dream.
  14. Delivers all the expected moments of high suspense --that is worthy of Hitchcock
  15. This is a fiendishly complicated whodunit -- or, to be more precise, a who-done-what-to-whom-and-when -- told within the confines of thoughtful, speculative science-fiction.
  16. This rich, emotionally complex movie finds Almodóvar venturing into trickier, more fascinating territory, even if his themes.
  17. Easily the most searing movie-going experience of the year.
  18. It has everything Oscar voters fall in love with: sweep, romance, accessibility and social conscience.
  19. Remarkably astute and devastatingly funny.
    • Miami Herald
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Great, multilayered family film.
  20. A soaring, exhilarating fantasy grounded in earthy emotion, Crouching Tiger more than lives up to the hype.
    • Miami Herald
  21. It's a small victory, but Punch-Drunk Love knows how to reap epic delight from the most precious of details.
  22. Offers a ride worth taking -- an excursion through a fantastical pop universe that is pure, enchanting magic. Try it; you'll like it.
  23. But this smart, genuinely creepy movie also feels <I>real</I>, which is why its horrors hit so hard. Fans of the scary stuff, run, don't walk.
  24. A unique bond still develops between the two outcasts, leading to an unexpected resolution that ends this subtle, deeply humane movie on an ambiguous, but unmistakably hopeful, note.
  25. The moral of Irreversible -- time destroys everything -- isn't nearly as profound as writer-director Gaspar No&#233; seems to think it is, which is why some critics have already dismissed the movie as the facile, misogynistic posturings of a provocateur.
  26. It feels wholly artificial, and your eyes never tire of drinking it all in.
  27. The film actually improves on Cunningham's novel, thanks to gorgeous cinematography, a deft script by playwright David Hare, a mournful, melodious but never intrusive score by Philip Glass and a superb cast that brings the delicately formed characters to full, raging, sorrowful life.
  28. Leaves you in a state of stunned, exhilarated awe, both for what it shows and how it shows it.
  29. A fiendishly subtle horror movie, a goosebump-inducing exercise in suspense that uses your own imagination to scare you silly.
  30. At the film's uplifting conclusion, when a stilled voice finally makes itself heard, you can unmistakably feel your heart lift, as if it had grown tiny wings. Camp reminds you that once you believed it would always soar, just like that.
  31. More of a warm breeze than a great gust, but its simple, smart pleasures carry the force of a hurricane.
  32. It's a sign of just how much Coppola respects her characters that she doesn't make us privy to that final line: It is only meant for them to share. But like the rest of the ethereal Lost in Translation, you don't need to have it spelled out in order to feel it.
  33. It is pretty convincing in its argument that China has every intention of destroying the culture of Tibetans.
  34. Deals with themes Eastwood has often explored before, but never so delicately or with as much sad wisdom: The way in which our past haunts our present, the lasting repercussions of violence and the cruel inexorability of fate.
  35. A lot of ground for one film to cover, but this smart, absorbing movie, which has been sharply edited by Felipe Lacerda, never feels like it's spreading itself too thin.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Tupac Amaru Shakur is riveting in Tupac: Resurrection. The rapper is a compelling, charismatic hero: articulate, well-read, politically radical, and movie-star handsome to boot (he in fact starred in Poetic Justice and Juice). Make that, was riveting.
  36. Won't appeal to everyone, of course, particularly those who blush easily. And parents who take children to see it deserve to have their heads examined. But for those who don't mind a little bile in their eggnog, it's the perfect antidote to all that prefab Christmas cheer.
  37. The most compelling -- and horrifying -- portion of the film, which interweaves archival footage and stylish graphics with the interview segments, centers on the firebombing of Japan during World War II.
  38. The Language of Music hews strictly to its title, however. There isn't anything about Dowd's life outside music except for details of his work as a nuclear physicist at Columbia University, where he was a key part of the Manhattan Project research team that developed the atomic bomb during World War II.
  39. The Dreamers argues that life must be lived, not dreamt. But it also remembers the confounding pleasures of dreaming with your eyes wide open.
  40. Many questions remain purposely unanswered: Where was the father for 12 years? Why did he want to go away with the kids? What's in a box he finds hidden in the island? Yet, in a remarkable ending, the boys discover their feelings.
  41. This delicate, transporting movie, which keeps dialogue to a minimum to tell its story primarily through images, is also a triumph of sheer cinematic craft that mirrors its characters' contemplative natures while extolling the virtues of lives simply led.
  42. Like the best coming-of-age stories, I'm Not Scared (Io Non Ho Paura) is, in part, a work of horror.
  43. Bertucelli nails it.
  44. Enlightening documentary.
  45. Clearly an important film, if only for such disheartening reminders that a McDonald's salad with ranch dressing has more calories than a Big Mac or that Miami is the 15th fattest city in the country (Houston is No. 1).
  46. Control Room may not seem all that compelling 10 years down the road. But right now, at this very moment, it is essential, imperative viewing.
  47. You feel terribly sad and angry at May's foolishness. Yet with so many emotions at hand, The Mother never fails to engage.
  48. Though all actors are up to the challenge, it is the plot that makes The Inheritance shine.
  49. If you found "Crouching Tiger" a stunning bore, you probably won't fall under Hero's spell. But the rest of us, well, we'll be more than happy to savor every moment of its strange, ravishing beauty.
  50. DiG! is raw, just as the band members themselves.
  51. The movie is such an intense, disturbing and exhilarating experience, even five more minutes might have felt like too much.
  52. A Frenchman may have thought of the story first, but this Korean film pays tribute to the original while perfectly standing on its own.
  53. It's a good, old-fashioned North Pole adventure.
  54. The movie's scientific content is so fascinating that it almost feels like a bonus that Kinsey himself is such an intriguing figure.
  55. Almodóvar has never been shy about experimenting with plot structure, but Bad Education is the closest he's ever come to a metamovie, the sort of self-reflective, hall-of-mirrors contraption on which Charlie Kaufman has built his career.
  56. The result is one of the most visually astonishing martial-arts fantasies ever made.
  57. Rising above simple sentiment to explore class differences and the enduring clash between East and West with wit and wisdom.
    • Miami Herald
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Penn's performance is easily the best ever seen in an Allen film.
  58. By the end, Turtles Can Fly becomes a lyrical and heartbreaking reminder of the human toll of war.
  59. With a light, sometimes hilarious touch, Look at Me deflates the pretensions and self-obsessed nature of a group of wealthy Parisian literati, but its observations about the effects of fame and success and our natural desire to fan them as high as they can go, apply to anyone within range of reality-TV culture.
  60. Gordon Gekko didn't disappear with the 1980s; he just became a lot more difficult to pick out from a crowd.
  61. Smashing, supremely engrossing picture.
  62. Murderball invokes fascination toward its protagonists, because it views them with the same confidence and acceptance they view themselves.
  63. Saraband portrays a sad vision of aging, yet the film is never depressing. For those inclined to search for psychological twists, the film offers plenty of Freudian situations capable of provoking lengthy discussions.
  64. Herzog himself is one of the great lunatic directors of our century, a mad genius who repeatedly attempts to challenge nature and the gods in his own films.
  65. Hilarious and imaginatively crude with a surprising sweet and subtle aftertaste that prevents it from flopping, limp and brainless, into the sugary abyss of romantic predictability.
  66. Campfire looks a bit drab, perhaps to show the dullness of Zionist life in the 1980s. But this doesn't take away from the poignancy of the film.
  67. It's a punchy, straight-up genre picture, a crime drama that might have once starred Charles Bronson or Steven Seagal.
  68. The movie implies that despite its thunderous success, the book also destroyed Capote, who crossed a line in his quest for personal glory for which he could never forgive himself -- no matter how many accolades it brought him.
  69. The magic of the movies is never more evident than with stop-motion animation, and nobody does it better than Wallace and Gromit creator Nick Park.
  70. A wild buckle-up-and-blast-off adventure that plunges every corner of kids' favorite subject.
  71. There's a timelessness to her character that makes her real even today. And in Devos' intense portrayal, she's a woman you admire.
  72. Match Point begins to recall Hitchcock as it unfolds, although it wouldn't be right to call it a thriller. This is still very much a Woody Allen movie, populated by upper-class characters who chatter about literature and fine art, frequent museums and designer boutiques and accidentally run into each other on the street with uncanny regularity.
  73. Doesn't feel so much like a movie as a glimpse into the extraordinarily messed-up life of a young man about to make the simple yet life-changing realization that actions have consequences, and that other people matter, too.
  74. There's nothing about United 93 that qualifies as entertainment in the traditional sense: It is an unpleasant, wrenching experience, which is just as it should be.
  75. Politics in Three Times is as subtle as the stories being told. The film is probably too slow, too silent and too long for most audiences. But look beyond the quietness, and you'll discover a three-gem jewel.
  76. Despite its scary warnings, the film ends on an upbeat note, unless of course you happen to be Hillary Clinton's campaign manager.
  77. A rousing and mesmerizing documentary.
  78. The touch of sharp and edgy storytelling has returned to French master Claude Chabrol.
  79. In House of Sand, shifting sands are not a cliché; they provide the essential emotional and visual elements that make this film memorable.
  80. It takes some exceptionally intelligent and witty people to make a dumb comedy this funny and perceptive: Borat may be offensive (to some), infantile, low-brow or even just a stunt, but you won't hate yourself in the morning for loving it.
  81. Ceylan examines human relationships with an eye for details and a soul for the big picture.
  82. In a year rich with animation options, Happy Feet stands head and shoulders above its competition.
  83. Beautifully textured and layered movie.
  84. Awe-inspiring and harrowing, vile and beautiful, as wild and mesmerizing as the Mexican jungle in which it is filmed and one of the most relentlessly thrilling films of the year.
  85. Letters From Iwo Jima, much like any war movie, honors the courage of men who took part in a war not necessarily of their making. But by placing us on the opposite side of the battlefield, the movie forces us to approach it from a fresh perspective.
  86. Children of Men is thrilling, both for its groundbreaking style (there are action sequences here unlike any filmed before) and its complex, vividly realized ideas.
  87. Dench and Blanchett will likely pick up Oscar nominations; no one could improve on either performance.
  88. An exuberant, disarming entertainment.
    • Miami Herald
  89. Groening doesn't judge the monks' actions, nor does he tell us much about their reasons for choosing such a life. Yet the film brings us into their lives not as an observer but almost as a fellow hermit, making you realize how hard -- or easy -- it would be to commit yourself to such a life.
  90. A rarity, a film that preserves the depth and integrity of its source while bringing the story to life in an indelible way.
  91. The Wind that Shakes the Barley is a multi-layered story, and the more you see those different aspects, the more you'll enjoy the film.
  92. As this intimate, beautifully observed film unfolds, you realize that the story's themes -- the nature of love, the role of sex in relationships and the ways in which we learn to make peace with our guilty consciences -- are relevant no matter what age you happen to be.
  93. This is a wonderfully imagined, heartfelt piece of pop entertainment that soars not only for its spectacular eye candy, but also during the moments when its protagonists simply stand still and talk to each other. How many comic-book movies can you say that about?
  94. Those rigorously moral and humanistic underpinnings give 28 Weeks Later a kind of power that 100 Saws and Texas Chainsaw Massacre remakes could never achieve.
  95. Virtually everything Americans know about Ellis Island they've learned from the movies, and virtually all those movies were American. Golden Door offers the other side of the story, the one that ends at Ellis Island instead of beginning there.

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