Miami Herald's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 2,963 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Spider-Man 2
Lowest review score: 0 The Man
Score distribution:
2,963 movie reviews
  1. Sharp, witty and decidedly different.
  2. Although it is structured like a thriller, and its plot dominated by Benjamin's detective work, The Secret in Their Eyes is really a cautionary tale about the consequences of a life of too much apprehension and propriety.
  3. Those rigorously moral and humanistic underpinnings give 28 Weeks Later a kind of power that 100 Saws and Texas Chainsaw Massacre remakes could never achieve.
  4. Like Roman Polanski's "Repulsion," Martha Marcy May Marlene gradually places us inside the mind of a woman who just might be insane, and in its audacious, terrifying final scene, the movie traps us there in perpetuity, refusing to provide the viewer with a way out. This time, the horror follows you home - no exit, no escape.
  5. Mendes' approach to action is classical and elegant - no manic editing and blurry unintelligible images here - but what makes the movie truly special is the attention he gives his actors.
  6. Once you're among them, the Tenenbaums -- and Anderson -- cast quite a spell.
    • Miami Herald
  7. McGregor hasn't been this appealing or vulnerable in ages, and in both of the film's love stories, he exemplifies Mills' message.
  8. One of the most rewarding and engaging movies of the year. Don't miss it.
  9. Never shies from acknowledging the natural fascination with their abnormalities.
  10. The Wrestler presents a fascinating peek at the workings of the pro wrestling industry (the tenderness and humor the athletes share backstage is the complete opposite of the ferocity they display in the ring).
  11. Campfire looks a bit drab, perhaps to show the dullness of Zionist life in the 1980s. But this doesn't take away from the poignancy of the film.
  12. The Language of Music hews strictly to its title, however. There isn't anything about Dowd's life outside music except for details of his work as a nuclear physicist at Columbia University, where he was a key part of the Manhattan Project research team that developed the atomic bomb during World War II.
  13. No
    No is an exploration of the power of the media to manipulate hearts and minds. The moral of the story: Always go positive.
  14. The movie contains little in terms of traditional action, and Refn never uses it in a rousing or exciting manner, either. That would break the nightmarish spell this strange, beautiful film casts on the viewer. A mother’s love has never been this ruinous.
  15. If only more romantic comedies played out as charmingly and perceptively as this one.
  16. The remarkable Hoop Dreams proves that even at its best, Hollywood can't match the drama of everyday life. This rich and insightful documentary, which traces five years in the lives of two Chicago inner-city kids, is more compelling than anything a pack of scriptwriters could ever concoct. [21 Oct 1994, p.G5]
    • Miami Herald
  17. Straw Dogs is an artful provocation - a meditation on masculinity and societal mores in the guise of an explosive thriller.
  18. This remarkable documentary argues that art can also be the glue that binds disparate souls.
  19. What ultimately makes Drive so compelling is its characters - sketches given dimension and heft by a superb cast.
  20. Gunn makes this huge entertainment accessible to the converted and the neophyte alike, and he has only has one goal: To send you out of the theater with a fat smile on your face. Mission accomplished.
  21. Director Kim Jee-woon's astonishing story of a serial killer who picks the wrong man's fiancée to murder, is so extreme and intense that it had to be trimmed down in its native country before it was released to theaters. We lucky westerners get to see it in all its hair-raising, stomach-churning glory, and that's a wonderful thing.
  22. Beautifully textured and layered movie.
  23. As film noirs go, this one is a classic.
  24. JFK
    JFK is staggering in its power. [20 Dec 1991, p.5]
    • Miami Herald
  25. This delicate, transporting movie, which keeps dialogue to a minimum to tell its story primarily through images, is also a triumph of sheer cinematic craft that mirrors its characters' contemplative natures while extolling the virtues of lives simply led.
  26. Star Trek Into Darkness gives you an exhilarating, tingle-inducing rush — that rare feeling that comes when a gigantic entertainment is firing on all fronts, exceeding your expectations.
  27. A film of this sort demands superb, seemingly effortless acting, and Holofcener gets it at every turn.
  28. A film of rare beauty, lifted by some of the best acting you may see in any film this year.
  29. Gripping, made more intense by the knowledge that all is true.
  30. In Captain Phillips, director Paul Greengrass pulls off the same remarkable feat he accomplished with "United 93": He takes a true story in which the outcome is already known and transforms it into a gripping, wrenching, devastating thriller.
  31. I Am Love is a bold and thrilling masterpiece -- the introduction of a major talent to the world's stage.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Penn's performance is easily the best ever seen in an Allen film.
  32. The moral of Irreversible -- time destroys everything -- isn't nearly as profound as writer-director Gaspar Noé seems to think it is, which is why some critics have already dismissed the movie as the facile, misogynistic posturings of a provocateur.
  33. The movie is supremely entertaining -- and often hilarious.
  34. Campos, a cinematic disciple of Stanley Kubrick and latter-period Gus Van Sant, opts to let the movie do the talking for him. The fact that this is a film of few words only adds to its hypnotic, relentless pull.
  35. Chemistry is one of the few things left filmmakers can't fake with CGI, and the dynamic between Craig and Mara in The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is so sensational, it instantly propels the movie beyond glossy, high-toned pulp into something far more affecting.
  36. Coriolanus is not by any stretch a hero, and yet Fiennes makes him magnetic, a warrior you can't look away from even when you might want to.
  37. The movie plays out as a series of memories, so exact and evocative that watching it becomes an immersive experience.
  38. So deliciously absorbing and well done.
  39. Profoundly hopeful and optimistic film.
  40. Murderball invokes fascination toward its protagonists, because it views them with the same confidence and acceptance they view themselves.
  41. Gravity is a celebration of the primal pleasure of movies: It shows you things you’ve never seen before, transports you out of the theater and out of your head, tricks you into believing what’s happening on the screen is happening to you.
  42. Foxcatcher is too cold of a movie to love, but that chilliness is intentional and transfixing, a parable about the darkest corners of the minds of men that dares to whisper instead of shout.
  43. If you found "Crouching Tiger" a stunning bore, you probably won't fall under Hero's spell. But the rest of us, well, we'll be more than happy to savor every moment of its strange, ravishing beauty.
  44. Poltergiest is no nonstop scream express; at times it pulls its punches (Spielberg wants that PG rating), and at times its effects are bigger than life and less than terrifying. But like Spielberg's Jaws, which was a perfect genre movie, Poltergeist does what it's supposed to do about as well as it can be done.
  45. Wild may sound like a film about redemption, but it’s more about learning to live with what you can’t control — and accepting what you can control, which is sometimes just as difficult.
  46. It showcases one of Whedon's greatest strengths: his ability to take previously disrespected genres - in this case the slasher film - and turn them inside-out and upside-down and every which way but loose.
  47. Herzog himself is one of the great lunatic directors of our century, a mad genius who repeatedly attempts to challenge nature and the gods in his own films.
  48. That broad range of subject matter is indicative of the messy, meandering structure of the movie. But if Moore fails to tie this unwieldy movie into a lucid thesis, at least every tangent he chases down has its own payoff.
  49. Groening doesn't judge the monks' actions, nor does he tell us much about their reasons for choosing such a life. Yet the film brings us into their lives not as an observer but almost as a fellow hermit, making you realize how hard -- or easy -- it would be to commit yourself to such a life.
  50. With a light, sometimes hilarious touch, Look at Me deflates the pretensions and self-obsessed nature of a group of wealthy Parisian literati, but its observations about the effects of fame and success and our natural desire to fan them as high as they can go, apply to anyone within range of reality-TV culture.
  51. Blue Jasmine, which is easily Allen’s best and most powerful movie since 2005’s "Match Point", is filled with terrific performances, including Hawkins as the sweet-natured Ginger.
  52. The Dreamers argues that life must be lived, not dreamt. But it also remembers the confounding pleasures of dreaming with your eyes wide open.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Thanks to myriad animators, the characters cavort, laugh and struggle against stunning backdrops, from lush jungles to cascading waterfalls. Groovy? Absolutely.
    • Miami Herald
  53. Cotillard, who earned a Best Actress Oscar nomination for her performance, plays the character as a woman hanging on by the barest of threads.
  54. By the end, Turtles Can Fly becomes a lyrical and heartbreaking reminder of the human toll of war.
  55. The casting of Hiddleston and Swinton was a stroke of genius: They emanate a particular sort of cool only they seem privy to, accentuating their alienation.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Tupac Amaru Shakur is riveting in Tupac: Resurrection. The rapper is a compelling, charismatic hero: articulate, well-read, politically radical, and movie-star handsome to boot (he in fact starred in Poetic Justice and Juice). Make that, was riveting.
  56. This is an intentionally fanciful, gossamer movie, extremely personal and heartfelt, influenced in equal parts by Michelangelo Antonioni (although never so elusive) and Gus Van Sant (just not quite so self-conscious).
  57. Monsieur Lazhar doesn't send you home depressed. Instead, the film leaves you hopeful, and even exhilarated, that even the most painful wounds can sometimes heal.
  58. Leigh is obviously a major talent of the English film resurgence, which may already have peaked but nonetheless offers hopes of its own. His loose way of making films -- the wandering camera, the scenes that seem to invent themselves as they go along -- somehow accommodates a genuine comic intelligence, which usually requires the tightest of controls. [2 June 1989, p.7]
    • Miami Herald
  59. Waltz With Bashir isn't only a harrowing anti-war plea, it is also an eloquent and deeply moving argument that it is critical to never forget human atrocity, lest the past be repeated.
  60. There's nothing about United 93 that qualifies as entertainment in the traditional sense: It is an unpleasant, wrenching experience, which is just as it should be.
  61. A big, bold movie that gets at undeniable truths about the way no one, no matter how powerful, is immune from manipulation.
  62. One of the scariest films I've seen in ages, although I cannot in all honesty explain exactly what the movie is about.
  63. By the end of the movie, when all your questions have been answered, you're left with the exhilarating high of having been manipulated by a gifted artist in a diabolically dark mood.
  64. Broken English takes 30 minutes to do what most romantic comedies manage with a simple montage. That's a good thing, by the way.
  65. This is a romantic comedy that makes the concept of romantic comedies appealing again -- that reminds you how resonant and transporting they can be when they're done right.
  66. Almodóvar has never been shy about experimenting with plot structure, but Bad Education is the closest he's ever come to a metamovie, the sort of self-reflective, hall-of-mirrors contraption on which Charlie Kaufman has built his career.
  67. By the end, the movie has pulled off a small miracle: You become absorbed in the lives of these people for who they are and not what they own.
  68. A fiendishly subtle horror movie, a goosebump-inducing exercise in suspense that uses your own imagination to scare you silly.
  69. Saraband portrays a sad vision of aging, yet the film is never depressing. For those inclined to search for psychological twists, the film offers plenty of Freudian situations capable of provoking lengthy discussions.
  70. The Grandmaster sets aside traditional story structure in its last 15 minutes and becomes one of the filmmaker’s free-form visual poems, suffused with melancholy and compassion.
  71. Impossible to resist.
  72. Remarkably astute and devastatingly funny.
    • Miami Herald
  73. The film is far from a downer. If anything, more than any of the films in the trilogy, this one may be the most hopeful - and the most affecting.
  74. It's a good, old-fashioned North Pole adventure.
  75. A wild buckle-up-and-blast-off adventure that plunges every corner of kids' favorite subject.
  76. Pay attention, Michael Bay: This is what thrilling summer movies look like.
  77. The story of Paranoid Park may center on an extreme and unusual case, but it's Van Sant's understanding of -- and compassion for -- the hell of growing up that makes the film such a profound and lasting pleasure.
  78. You feel terribly sad and angry at May's foolishness. Yet with so many emotions at hand, The Mother never fails to engage.
  79. It's a small victory, but Punch-Drunk Love knows how to reap epic delight from the most precious of details.
  80. Like his con artists are prone to saying, American Hustle works from the feet up, and the fun is intoxicating.
  81. It is a riveting and memorable performance and Kingsley finds subtlety in Logan where there doesn't seem to be any.
  82. There isn't a moment in the entire film that doesn't feel genuine.
  83. It's an eye opener to how quickly a society can switch from being open and tolerant to pointing fingers -- and worse -- at those deemed different.
    • Miami Herald
  84. This is an exciting, exceptionally well-made futuristic thriller that also happens to be loaded with lived-in touches and punchy ideas.
  85. A marketable counterpoint to last year’s "Boyhood."
  86. An exuberant, appropriately cynical reinvention of the stalwart Broadway hit that deftly straddles the line between old-fashioned Hollywood musicals and experimental concoctions like last year's "Moulin Rouge."
  87. The result is a gripping psychological thriller that, while lacking the power of "Funny Games," is still the work of a master.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    What makes this sequel work is the charm of its story.
  88. This is a fiendishly complicated whodunit -- or, to be more precise, a who-done-what-to-whom-and-when -- told within the confines of thoughtful, speculative science-fiction.
  89. The film wouldn't work at all, though, if Sarsgaard didn't strike the perfect balance between snaky predator and love-struck fool.
  90. Like "A Separation," which used the story of a dissolving marriage to illustrate the unexpected consequences of a rigid, inflexible society, About Elly turns what starts out as a breezy comedy into an engaging and substantial exploration of human nature and how sometimes, without intending to, we hurt the ones we love most — including ourselves.
  91. The Wind that Shakes the Barley is a multi-layered story, and the more you see those different aspects, the more you'll enjoy the film.
  92. Harrowing and grueling, Lebanon ends on a gentle, hopeful note.
  93. Won't appeal to everyone, of course, particularly those who blush easily. And parents who take children to see it deserve to have their heads examined. But for those who don't mind a little bile in their eggnog, it's the perfect antidote to all that prefab Christmas cheer.
  94. A script that deftly fleshes out characters and mimics reality shockingly well.
  95. The magic of the movies is never more evident than with stop-motion animation, and nobody does it better than Wallace and Gromit creator Nick Park.
  96. Politics in Three Times is as subtle as the stories being told. The film is probably too slow, too silent and too long for most audiences. But look beyond the quietness, and you'll discover a three-gem jewel.

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