Miami Herald's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 2,881 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Social Network
Lowest review score: 0 Antitrust
Score distribution:
2,881 movie reviews
  1. Takes one side, but it tries to offer hope that change can happen.
  2. So beautifully directed, so pleasurable to watch and so thoughtfully put together, it's a disappointment when you realize, halfway through, that the movie is going to fall way short of a masterpiece.
  3. May not offer anything new, but in its well-tested premise, you can't fail to be seduced.
  4. Unapologetically slanted -- and often hilarious.
  5. Every time Riding Giants starts feeling a little too insidery for casual viewers, along comes another, even bigger wave, daring these puny mortals to conquer it.
  6. Shot in the style of a documentary, which lends the movie an aura of utter realism, Maria Full of Grace derives an unsettling power from the clinical details of Maria's ordeal.
  7. Achieves an assaultive intensity that adds a level of visceral excitement to car chases, mano-a-mano showdowns -- even simple conversations. It's a style that takes some getting used to -- the images flit by at near-subliminal speeds -- but proves tremendously effective.
  8. There's no denying the intelligence at work here, or Braff's skill at weaving off-the-wall humor and sight gags into a story that, at heart, is profoundly sad.
  9. Filled with conspiracies, intrigue and the suggestion that modern-day society is purposely designed to drive us a little nuts, The Manchurian Candidate is a paranoid fantasy for our time.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    A hard and hilariously ironic look at the bottom line. As it turns out, love was not all you needed; hard cash came in handy, too.
  10. A film more psychological than passionate, more mental than emotional.
  11. Collateral is a small, modest movie writ large by people so talented, they aren't capable of anything less.
  12. In addition to providing a textbook example of suspense, Estes also makes us want to know what happens to these kids after the screen goes dark.
  13. Red Lights is actually an examination of marriage -- of what keeps people together long after the passion has fizzled, and all that's left is bitterness and resentment.
  14. If you don't have a dog waiting for you at home after seeing A Letter to True, you'll want one.
  15. A mesmerizing documentary about the rise and fall of a drug lord, perhaps the biggest there ever was.
  16. Mines a great deal of its humor from the can't-be-bothered attitude of British culture, but the jokes survive the trip across the Atlantic mostly intact.
  17. Fabulously perverted comedy.
  18. What Shark Tale lacks in originality it makes up for with sassy humor, bright, effective animation and terrific vocal work.
  19. Guaranteed to engage the decided and undecided alike, regardless of party affiliations.
  20. Primer is obviously not for all tastes, but if it connects with you, prepare to be obsessed.
  21. Has a weird, compelling energy, fueled by a deliciously dynamic cast, a cheerfully bawdy and odd story line and a refreshing, impossible romance.
  22. But by the time you understand the meaning of its title, Sabiha Sumar's film has delivered an emotional punch.
  23. Makes a compelling argument for women's rights without ever succumbing to preachiness.
  24. Being Julia is really about the fear of aging and the battle to remain relevant professionally and sexually.
  25. A fresh breath of air, warmer than the icy village in which it takes place. You'll leave the theater with a wink and a smile.
  26. If you haven't caught Lightning on PBS already, find a theater with a good sound system, sit back and be grateful the music endures.
  27. It's a dreamy Southern gothic, a la "Night of the Hunter," with an emphasis on the dreamy.
  28. Ray
    If Ray fails to present a genuine portrait of a complex man's essence, it does leave you with an even greater sense of awe for Charles' accomplishments, both in his personal and public lives.
  29. The beauty of Huo Ji Anqi's film transcends China's lush Hunan province to focus on the peace that comes from within.
  30. Such smooth, crisp entertainment, you barely even notice it has nothing new to say.
  31. Cachorro's main flaw is in its ending, which seems somewhat abrupt and unfinished, but these characters have become so endearing by then that it hardly seems to matter.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    He'll be back; he's already back. But that doesn't mean the ''farewell'' wasn't worth it.
  32. There's something to be said about an old story given a new ending -- and making it work.
  33. It's a small, heartening slice of life that feels like a crucial step toward something bigger.
  34. Scorsese has crafted a luxurious entertainment that goes down like a flute of sparkling, silky champagne.
  35. An enchanting romantic comedy between two lost souls in the most unexpected of places.
  36. A work of wonderfully sinister fantasy. Director Brad Silberling is always mindful of his kiddie audience -- the movie is never even remotely scary.
  37. Often, the movie leaves you wishing Briski had found a way to document more of her subjects' day-to-day lives.
  38. Fortunately, Bardem, who earned an Oscar nomination for his role in Julian Schnabel's "Before Night Falls," makes up for the script's shortcomings.
  39. All we can do is hope that films such as Hotel Rwanda remind us all -- moviegoer and politician -- of the terrible cost of doing nothing.
  40. What makes The Woodsman meaningful is Bacon's tortured suffering.
  41. Engaging and enjoyable.
  42. Heavy-handed and manipulative, it also proves formidably engrossing.
  43. It's big, exciting, ambitious, and it makes you cry in all the right places.
  44. O'Donnell has a fine eye for the small details of life and the movie feels rich, warm and real .
  45. Offers a rose-colored picture of life, but one that Campanella makes ring true.
  46. The Lady and the Duke is not about the revolution. It's an intimate story of a woman's perspective during a dramatic event in world history.
  47. May disappoint those who expect a more traditional Chinese setting. But, despite its modern look, this is far from being a Western film.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Hardly the first of Woody Allen's love letters to the good old days, but it's a high-spirited, entertaining one, falling along the same lines as "Radio Days."
  48. Secret of this 'Ballot' lies in its humor, charm and universality.
  49. Will leave you taking sides, whether or not that was the film's intent.
  50. An oddity, but a remarkably intriguing and original one, and in Buck ... it also has the most unforgettable movie character of the year.
  51. Dark Blue World's warm story and beautiful photography almost hits the mark, and it has a great ending.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    One of the freshest, nastiest comedies to come around in quite some time.
  52. Descended from a long and healthy line of high school-sports and academic-achievement films, a hip-hop "Hoosiers" bolstered by a generous helping of "Stand and Deliver" and "Lean On Me."
  53. Smart, entertaining update.
  54. What ensues is a love story ringed by barbed wire and etched in blood with the jagged neck of a broken beer bottle.
  55. Touching.
  56. In Spanish, the title of the film, El abrazo partido, translates into ''a broken embrace,'' a more fitting description of Ariel's feelings for his father.
  57. Luminous, melancholy and ultimately heartbreaking.
  58. Smith is an endearing, driving comedic force, one who makes the buoyant Hitch more enjoyable than it has any reason to be.
  59. Considering the seedy nature of the adult film industry and the sad fates of many of its stars, Inside Deep Throat is surprisingly light on tragedy.
  60. There are many nuances to My Mother's Smile, not all of them evenly told. Yet even when the conversations sound absurd, the film never fails to captivate.
  61. The documentary also has a story to tell, and as such it builds up its drama.
  62. With a steely, unblinking resolve, Downfall stares into the abyss, but does not pretend to comprehend it.
  63. Not an ordinary film.
  64. Dear Frankie is a small movie with a big soul and no easy formula for the happiness of its big-hearted characters.
  65. In a simple, direct manner, Gunner Palace reminds you that the thousands of faceless, nameless troops in Iraq are still there after you switch off CNN.
  66. If there's one thing missing above all else from today's action movies, it's the lost art of the car chase.
  67. Watching these coolly precise, methodical actors spar with each other at the top of their game is half the show.
  68. For all its excitement Kung Fu Hustle is mostly a marvel of comedic ingenuity and mile-a-minute creativity run wild. You've never seen anything like it.
  69. Survives its surface annoyances because Lynch's script also has ambition, heart and something to say other than love conquers all.
  70. Beguilingly odd.
  71. There are few moments when you're not totally absorbed by the film.
  72. Mysterious Skin bears all of Araki's hallmarks, from its stylish compositions and lush colors to its willingness to confront difficult subject matter head-on.
  73. At its core, Susanne Bier's wrenching portrayal of the shifting dynamics within a Danish family is really about survival, about how we cope in the face of shattering grief and what we'll do -- anything, really -- to save ourselves.
  74. The documentary Mad Hot Ballroom is packed from start to finish with adorable kids doing cute things: Rarely has a movie, fictional or not, had this much awwwww factor.
  75. It's like "Lock, Stock" as filtered through the mind of David Mamet, with Craig as the suave middleman holding it all together.
  76. For all its doom and gloom, Revenge of the Sith turns out to have a happy ending after all, giving Star Wars the send-off it deserves.
  77. Just plain fun. Don't miss it.
  78. Batman Begins is a mature take on material often relegated to the kiddie file, and it's simply the latest proof that, when treated properly, comic books are a viable art form for all ages. Bring on the sequel.
  79. The movie is enchanting yet strangely menacing, and it becomes clear that Pawlikowski is no mere love fool.
  80. The result is an eye-opening social portrait in the tradition of "Paris Is Burning," the landmark 1990 documentary that introduced drag balls and ''vogueing'' to the mainstream, but it lacks the earlier film's structure and focus.
  81. Concise and intriguing.
  82. With considerable passion and more than a little anger, Cronicas argues that our appetite for an increasing coarse and sensational type of news programming has skewed our inner compasses.
  83. The excellent performances by the three leads, and the filmmakers' refusal to sugarcoat reality, elevate the film far beyond after-school special territory into something far more lasting.
  84. What makes the picture sail past its flaws is its earnest understanding of the desperation that drives people to regain control of their lives -- and the profound courage required to attempt it.
  85. View it as a fat-free but tasty cinematic treat in the middle of the long, hot summer.
  86. For anyone interested in the art of comedy, it's a veritable primer on the vagaries of humor.
  87. A haunting, poetic film, and yet it suffers two major failings. First, Murray provides too blank a slate for the audience to appreciate whatever insights a more expressive performance might have offered. Second, and far more troubling, is the way Jarmusch refuses to take his female characters seriously.
  88. This long, gorgeous, occasionally maddening movie is the work of a hopeless romantic who knows there is no pain as bittersweet -- or as haunting -- as the pain of a broken heart.
  89. The film, with its uniformly terrific cast, stern Gothic overtones and steady but measured pacing, is a crisp, old-fashioned delight, eschewing cheap tricks for repeated tiny pricks of unease that work up to a continuous gnawing dread.
  90. Craven ("Scream," "Nightmare on Elm Street") is already a legend in horror film circles, but this is the first time he has tried his hand at a slick, relatively bloodless suspense-thriller, and the genre suits him.
  91. Valiant enlists a squad of loveable birdbrains to turn the classic fighter-pilot formula into an upbeat adventure film loaded with laughs.
  92. The Constant Gardener is difficult to watch, literally. Meirelles' lens leaps and jitters too much, as if it's anxious it might be bludgeoned to death, too.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Very, very faithful to Proof the play.
  93. A perfectly cast Keanu Reeves pokes deadpan fun at himself in the role of Justin's New Age dentist, who hypnotizes the kid and encourages him to find his inner ''power animal.'' And Vince Vaughn, in a rare straight turn, is excellent as Justin's high school teacher.
  94. If you need proof that the British are different from the rest of us, look no farther than the thought-provoking Separate Lies, a chilly, intelligent and absorbing drama about infidelity, ethics and forgiveness.
  95. Serenity shows what might have happened if Han Solo had been the focus of the original "Star Wars" instead of whiny Jedi wannabe Luke Skywalker.

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