Miami Herald's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 2,890 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Pan's Labyrinth
Lowest review score: 0 The Man
Score distribution:
2,890 movie reviews
  1. A wonderfully rumpled, loose comedy about the paralyzing fear of failure.
  2. Enjoyably preposterous, old-guys-are-cool-too plot.
  3. A mature, insightful and extremely well-acted study of a boy at a crossroads in his life, and a doomed, tortured man who, consciously or not, longs for some kind of redemption, before it's too late.
  4. Takes one side, but it tries to offer hope that change can happen.
  5. A Frenchman may have thought of the story first, but this Korean film pays tribute to the original while perfectly standing on its own.
  6. Cars is certainly watchable, and there's always some amusing bit of business happening at the edges of the frame.
  7. De la Iglesia’s knack for offending audiences while showing them a good time is stronger than ever: Witching and Bitching isn’t much on substance or logic, but man, is it fun.
  8. Scary? Yes, in spots. Gratuitously gory? You bet. But, first and foremost, Zombieland is a comedy.
  9. While the film is undeniably melancholy, Moretti's trademark light touch keeps it from becoming overbearing.
  10. Though far from perfect -- the film is predictable -- Satin Rouge is a refreshing view of a foreign culture.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Critic Score
    The Lookout boasts some very interesting, original performances. They make this noirish, bank-heist caper intriguing, but in some ways they actually work against making it believable.
  11. The Hangover remains unrepentantly irresponsible and hilarious throughout, culminating with what could be the funniest montage ever to grace a picture's end credits. The summer's first sleeper hit has arrived.
  12. Roberts inhabits the character with a gravity and poignancy that she had never even hinted at before.
    • Miami Herald
  13. What distinguishes Spider-Man from most other comic book movies is that the film is at its most engaging when its hero is out of costume.
  14. Ray
    If Ray fails to present a genuine portrait of a complex man's essence, it does leave you with an even greater sense of awe for Charles' accomplishments, both in his personal and public lives.
  15. It's like "Lock, Stock" as filtered through the mind of David Mamet, with Craig as the suave middleman holding it all together.
  16. Hilarious and imaginatively crude with a surprising sweet and subtle aftertaste that prevents it from flopping, limp and brainless, into the sugary abyss of romantic predictability.
  17. It digs deep into the heart and soul of its lovers, who are idealistic, intelligent and passionate - and yet still risk everything they might gain for stolen moments together.
  18. Innocence is a gentle love story, one that touches on an issue of great sensitivity -- sexuality in old age.
  19. By retelling Glass' pathetic tale, Shattered Glass reminds you how our culture's emphasis on success and stardom in any field -- and the betrayal of ethics to attain them -- has a cumulative, corrosive effect on society, no matter how small the stage may be.
  20. Cynics may not fall for its melodrama, but Riding Alone is good for everyone else, including children.
  21. Contains all of the hallmarks of classic genre Spielberg: It shows you things you've never seen before, instills an accompanying sense of awestruck wonder, and delivers long stretches of heightened, delirious excitement that remind you why people started going to the movies in the first place.
  22. Dench and Blanchett will likely pick up Oscar nominations; no one could improve on either performance.
  23. The Grandmaster sets aside traditional story structure in its last 15 minutes and becomes one of the filmmaker’s free-form visual poems, suffused with melancholy and compassion.
  24. Overflowing with melancholy and tragedy, Road to Perdition is one of the most somber gangster pictures ever made.
  25. Doesn't sugarcoat the painful realities of Alzheimer's or the difficult decisions faced by relatives of its victims, but by film's end, its clear-eyed melancholy winds up feeling strangely uplifting.
  26. The Lady and the Duke is not about the revolution. It's an intimate story of a woman's perspective during a dramatic event in world history.
  27. Ceylan examines human relationships with an eye for details and a soul for the big picture.
  28. The only real casualty of Lehane's novel is Angie, here reduced to a supporting player who bears no resemblance to the original character, who is every bit as smart and tough and interesting as her boyfriend. It's a regrettable loss in a film that otherwise indicates its first-time director knows what he's doing.
  29. If you can look past all the flesh and the thongs and the thrusting - and I admit that is an almost impossible task and probably not one you'd want to undertake anyway - what's most distinctive about Steven Soderbergh's Magic Mike is its sense of fun.
  30. It showcases one of Whedon's greatest strengths: his ability to take previously disrespected genres - in this case the slasher film - and turn them inside-out and upside-down and every which way but loose.
  31. Cassel, who won a Cesar (France's equivalent to the Oscar) for his performance, invests the character with a grounding of humanity and honor that imply there are certain lines even Mesrine would never cross.
  32. It's Depp's misfire that keeps the picture from becoming a genuinely sweet pleasure: As it stands, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is the equivalent of NutriSweet.
  33. By film's end, we're deep into Coen brothers territory, with an extra splash of Sam Raimi-level gore.
  34. Using a semi-documentary approach, Glatzer and Westmoreland circumvent the considerable potential for sentimentality inherent in their story, instead taking a frank and direct approach to kids who, while far from hardened, are nowhere near innocent, either.
  35. Time Regained is not really worth the time it takes to see it.
  36. That broad range of subject matter is indicative of the messy, meandering structure of the movie. But if Moore fails to tie this unwieldy movie into a lucid thesis, at least every tangent he chases down has its own payoff.
  37. Puts you on edge about what goes on behind the closed doors of the White House. Even if the case against Kissinger is not fully convincing, the documentary keeps you glued to your seat and thinking long after you've left the theater.
  38. There's no doubt that Leigh gets inside his characters' lives. But that's often someplace we'd rather not be.
  39. JFK
    JFK is staggering in its power. [20 Dec 1991, p.5]
    • Miami Herald
  40. In the House seems to be building toward a cathartic and unexpected finale. Instead, you get a baffling fizzle — an inexcusably limp and unimaginative conclusion that doesn’t bring a single plot strand to a satisfying end.
  41. The movie is supremely entertaining -- and often hilarious.
  42. Not about sex; it's about leaps of faith, at work, in love, in life.
  43. This crowd-pleaser is a genuinely inspirational film, gorgeously filmed and wonderfully acted, echoing an uplifting sentiment that bears repeating: ''You don't throw a whole life away just because it's banged up a little.''
  44. Beguilingly odd.
  45. The screenplay for 7 Boxes is a beautiful example of how to craft a tense and increasingly complex thriller out of a simple scenario.
  46. By giving the hero's inner plight so many dimensions, Superman Returns brings a richer, grander perspective to a seminal character without changing his essence. It's a profoundly personal take on a universal icon, made by a filmmaker who continues to improve with each movie.
  47. "Our self-esteem is wrapped up in it,'' admits actress Tracie Thoms (who sticks with a natural curly look). "A woman's hair is her glory,'' Angelou says.
  48. None of this is all that engaging. But the art design of the movie makes up for the slack story.
  49. There are few moments when you're not totally absorbed by the film.
  50. There are other filmmakers who might have been drawn to a comic book as enchantingly ridiculous as Hellboy. But there are none who would have turned in a sleek $60 million picture as daringly silly, playful and imaginative as this one.
  51. More sour than sweet, but Steers knows that, even in a cruel, unsentimental world, there is room for forgiveness and hope. Just don't expect a hug.
  52. Star Trek Into Darkness gives you an exhilarating, tingle-inducing rush — that rare feeling that comes when a gigantic entertainment is firing on all fronts, exceeding your expectations.
  53. Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang is a movie obsessed more with the act of telling a story than the story itself, which explains why, when the movie's finally over, less than half the audience will have understood the finer points of the mystery.
  54. 50/50 is crude and funny, and it demands that you laugh. And you will.
  55. The actors are talented enough to carry the movie, but they fade into the background once things grow dire, and the special effects take over. There's no sense of wonder or awe.
  56. There isn't a moment in the movie where you don't feel Spielberg's passion, and this time, the film is worthy of his enthusiasm. It's a knockout.
  57. For anyone interested in the art of comedy, it's a veritable primer on the vagaries of humor.
  58. Easy A is unnecessarily hard on the religious kids. Unlike "Saved," it uses broad caricatures of gospel-singing fanatics to get laughs, and the bug-eyed, over-the-top performance by Bynes (who apparently really should have retired after making this film) doesn't help matters.
  59. You feel terribly sad and angry at May's foolishness. Yet with so many emotions at hand, The Mother never fails to engage.
  60. Unlike so many Hollywood thrillers, which too often rely on implausible or telegraphed twists, Transsiberian is carefully structured and designed to make sense when you replay the events in your head.
  61. Sometimes engaging, sometimes amusing and ultimately surprising.
  62. Wreck-It-Ralph is a gorgeously rendered story that will play just as well to children as to their parents, albeit for different reasons. Playstation and Xbox junkies will be equally pleased.
  63. It's a funny, even whimsical film about a man who survives tragic times, complete with Nazis, pratfalls and plenty of mugging.
  64. Gangs of New York is many things, but a masterpiece is not one of them. It is primarily, and somewhat surprisingly, a poky western, with a vengeful orphan.
  65. Carries an undeniable follow-your-field-of-dreams appeal.
  66. All of Egoyan's movies have revolved around characters with damaged, fragile psyches, but rarely have they been illustrated as deftly -- and as gracefully -- as in Felicia's Journey.
    • Miami Herald
  67. A long overdue look at the man's art and an unself-pitying and unsparing exploration of her (his daughter's) relationship with him.
    • Miami Herald
  68. It has everything Oscar voters fall in love with: sweep, romance, accessibility and social conscience.
  69. What makes The Woodsman meaningful is Bacon's tortured suffering.
  70. Shame is fearless in the way the most ambitious art often is, and to write it off for what it doesn't do is reductive and misguided. You don't just watch Shame: You feel it, too.
  71. This is neither the noir world of old '40s movies, of which he's clearly fond, nor something new and original enough to fit the concept. Instead, it feels like a blueprint for someone else to figure out.
  72. Predictable but amusing. The painfully awkward, stubby Gervais as romantic lead is a funny enough concept, but the actor's ongoing banter with Kinnear is engaging, and their styles mesh entertainingly.
  73. The film has a rather charming way of convincing you that there are times to shrug off the caviar and champagne and go for a fulfilling bowl of spaghetti.
  74. The best moments in Walk the Line are the plentiful musical sequences, from Cash's initial foray into the Sun Records studio in Memphis, to his nights performing in high school auditoriums alongside the likes of Elvis Presley, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis, to his landmark concert at Folsom Prison in 1968, where his dangerous, edgy persona was cemented.
  75. Match Point begins to recall Hitchcock as it unfolds, although it wouldn't be right to call it a thriller. This is still very much a Woody Allen movie, populated by upper-class characters who chatter about literature and fine art, frequent museums and designer boutiques and accidentally run into each other on the street with uncanny regularity.
  76. Provides a few of the best thrills so far this summer.
  77. Celebrates a larger-than-life heroism that is, sadly, all too rare.
    • Miami Herald
  78. As it spins along at a reasonably good clip - no one is going to mistake it for the slicker, more action-packed "Salt" - The Double unravels its secrets, which prove to be its undoing.
  79. The most amazing magic yet for the wildly popular franchise: It is genuinely engrossing.
  80. Director James Ponsoldt, who co-wrote the script with Susan Burke (inspired in part by her own experiences), opts for realism and modesty instead of sensation.
  81. Riveting.
  82. The stories touch our sensibilities, but the documentary never sugarcoats the childrens' experiences.
  83. Miraculously, the new picture makes the old one feel like Evans was just warming up.
  84. F/X
    F/X doesn't have the surprises when it needs them. [8 Feb 1986, p.C7]
    • Miami Herald
  85. A perfectly adequate horror romp, but it's hard to imagine anyone remembering it five years from now.
  86. Nothing about Leap Year plays out exactly like you expect, and Rowe prefers to send you home with enigmatic questions instead of clear-cut answers. You may not fully understand Laura, but chances are you won't be able to forget her.
  87. There's enough here to make anyone who enjoyed -- if that's the right word -- "Happiness" or "Magnolia" splendidly unhappy.
  88. Precious without ever being cloying, All the Real Girls is a wise, delicate and immensely touching romance.
  89. If I were 8, I would want to see it 800 times.
    • Miami Herald
  90. Tadpole was shot on digital video, and the images often look smeary and blurry, to the point of distraction. Then again, in a better movie, you might not have noticed.
  91. Really a blistering satire about spin and the manipulation of the media.
  92. The movie wouldn’t work, of course, without the chemistry between Hill and Tatum, an unlikely duo who share a tremendous charisma.
  93. Certainly pleasant, but it's also a bit safe.
    • Miami Herald
  94. Never crosses over into meanness, and even the most satirical character has a moment of empathy.
  95. If it's not quite as funny as you want it to be, it's still more than enough to keep you entertained.
  96. A film more psychological than passionate, more mental than emotional.
  97. The frustratingly uneven comedy Tropic Thunder has moments of full-on, bust-a-gut hilarity, along with long stretches where you can hear the crickets chirping in the theater.
  98. Craven ("Scream," "Nightmare on Elm Street") is already a legend in horror film circles, but this is the first time he has tried his hand at a slick, relatively bloodless suspense-thriller, and the genre suits him.
  99. Tangled packs old-fashioned Disney magic as endless as Rapunzel's locks.

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