Miami Herald's Scores

For 538 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 7.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Rescue Me: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Dads: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 280
  2. Negative: 0 out of 280
280 tv reviews
  1. At least Azaria and Hahn do have an uncertain chemistry that might have developed into something watchable had the producers not decided to provide it with a Greek chorus of locker-room cracks by loutish co-workers.
  2. It's standard fare, not worth staying home for. [26 Jan 1989]
    • Miami Herald
  3. There's no depth in Bodwatch -- er, Baywatch. It is what it is -- a day at the beach. Hunks 'n' Babes with Bodacious Bods, Sullying Sand 'n' Surf with Silly Stories. [22 Sept 1989, p.1]
    • Miami Herald
  4. What's missing is a soul, a reason to care what happens to the characters. Carter also fails to give viewers enough critical insights to fully understand the complex premise.[8 Oct 1999, p.1E]
    • Miami Herald
  5. Virtually everything in Accidentally on Purpose is some kind of cheap sexual crack or double entendre. The essential sweetness Elfman showed in Dharma & Greg and the later, unfortunately little-watched Courting Alex curdles into mean self-parody as she scorns her new boy-toy as an intellectual and economic inferior even as she grovels before his bedroom skills.
  6. Where The Class is warm and charming, Emergency is crude and overdrawn.
  7. Schlatter is smug and superficial, nothing more. He has no chemistry with his love interest, the pretty but vacant Sloan (Ami Dolenz). The other actors are reduced to slogging through caricatures. It's going to get pretty boring, week after week. [23 Aug 1990, p.1]
    • Miami Herald
  8. The jibes quickly wear thin and predictable, and there's simply not much to Help Me Help You.
  9. The Unit hits more false notes than an American Idol tryout.
  10. The show reduces some of its actors, notably Cole, to stereotypical shtick. There are too many characters and too many emotional shifts, but not enough depth. Viewers who visit the neighborhood of Brewster Place won't get close to its people. [1 May 1990]
    • Miami Herald
  11. Sheen and Cryer breathe some life into this thing, but a mercy killing might have been simpler. [22 Sept 2003, p.4E]
    • Miami Herald
  12. Carrie's antics in New York are a kind of chick version of Matthew Broderick's madcap adventures in Ferris Bueller's Day Off. But Schwartz can't cut the umbilical cord--perhaps fallopian tube is a more apt metaphor--to his original source material, and that's where The Carrie Diaries goes off the rails.
  13. By the end of a couple of episodes, most viewers will be wishing Spielberg and his henchmen had spent more time on scripts and less on special effects, even if it meant splicing old outtakes of Barney and Friends into the action sequences.
  14. It's hard to enjoy characters in such dire need of a hard slapping.
  15. Turgid and plodding, Rubicon has the pace of an industrial-training film and the lucidity of a Czech art movie with the subtitles turned off. It would have to triple its pulse to rise to the level of lethargy.
  16. Kath & Kim originated in Australia, which shares the British affection for slobby class humor, but here it falls about as flat as food-court champagne.
  17. [It] often sounds less like a television drama than a Criminal Procedures 101 lecture delivered at an offshore law school.
  18. With tepid performances and a lifeless script, Bag of Bones feels like more of a chore than a television viewing experience.
  19. Try as Midler might - and she does try, doing a few physical comedy bits that would make Lucille Ball proud - even she can't overcome the reality that Bette is an idea that never developed beyond the star's reputation. [11 Oct 2000, p.1E]
    • Miami Herald
  20. The CW’s newest wallow in adolescent angst.
  21. Tucker, despite having Katey Sagal from "Married . . . With Children" as Aunt Claire, plays as a weak copy of Malcolm. [2 Oct 2000, p.1E]
    • Miami Herald
  22. What it does have is a sleek but shallow cast that cannot lend any weight to the lighter-than-air writing.
  23. Plain Jane, The CW's counterfeit ugly-duckling show, is too triflingly stupid to reach Breakthrough's profound depth of awfulness, but give it points for its abject phoniness.
  24. This is essentially CSI without the microscopes, petri dishes or Marg Helgenberger. Yawn. [26 Sep 2002]
    • Miami Herald
  25. The show's boorishness is exceeded only by its dissimulation; not one frame of this thing--from the diners who seem not to notice that their table is surrounded by camera crews to the melodramatically villainous managers--is remotely believable.
  26. It is relentless and ultimately meretricious in skewing history to its conceit that the United States is a murderous war machine destroying everything in its path to empire.
  27. Where Modern Family is sweet and funny, The New Normal is cheap and hectoring.
  28. Watching seven characters sit around week after week in endless discussions of the ramifications of the fact that two of them have kissed may have been fun in the seventh grade. But, like the spinning teacups at Disney World or throwing up after drinking a jug of Ripple, it's an experience that doesn't wear well with time.
  29. Every attempt at treating a Big Idea seems sophomoric and irritating. Even in its look, the show lacks the elemental rawness necessary to throw its intellectual conflicts into sharp relief.
  30. Ken Kwapis, who developed Outsourced for TV, had nothing to do with the movie. And in his hands, the film's charm has curdled into caricature. All the Indians are dysfunctional weirdos, incapable of even simple social interactions.

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