Miami Herald's Scores

For 539 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 8.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Gilmore Girls: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 Uncle Buck: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 280
  2. Negative: 0 out of 280
280 tv reviews
  1. Hit & Miss, once you get past the successive bombshells of its opening minutes, is a painful yet endearing drama about trying to build a family in a landscape blighted by loneliness and rejection.
  2. In any season, I'll Fly Away would stand out for its sensitive writing and acting. [7 Oct 1991]
    • Miami Herald
  3. It's very, very funny. ... The ingredients are all here (neat star, clever writing, a talented, well-defined supporting ensemble) for a classy comedy hit in the Cheers or Mary Tyler Moore Show mold. [14 Nov 1988]
    • Miami Herald
  4. Reiser and Hunt have great romantic chemistry. [13 Sep 1992]
    • Miami Herald
  5. Based on the pilot episode--with its taut script, strong performances and special effects that are impressive without being overwhelming--there’s hope that Under The Dome might measure up to its unsettling print progenitor.
  6. Given the gamut of Lois' emotions, it's no wonder Teri Hatcher can't get a handle on her character. For his part, the handsome but wooden Dean Cain won't make anyone forget Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel -- not even the scene in which the hunky former pro football player wears only a towel. He's just So-So-Man. [12 Sept 1993, p.1]
    • Miami Herald
  7. Invasion is an excellent show, the new season's best drama.
  8. A wild, careening chariot ride of a new series that debuts tonight. It's like The Sopranos in togas, except without even the faintest twinge of conscience. [28 Aug 2005, p.8]
    • Miami Herald
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Critic Score
    Fox's return to prime-time TV finds him hitting his mark...What's more, the actor is surrounded by a likable cast. [17 Sept 1996, p.1C]
    • Miami Herald
  9. Young Indy is TV's answer to archaeology, a sweeping and ambitious depiction of the 20th Century. It has been shot around the world, against spectacular scenery, by noted international directors. And it is a triumph for executive producer George Lucas, who makes his passion for history absorbing through an outlandish premise. [4 Mar 1992, p.E1]
    • Miami Herald
  10. The result is a blend that’s sometimes funny, occasionally poignant and fitfully horrifying. There are flashes of a Nixon rarely glimpsed or perhaps even suspected.
  11. It's only when the action (and the torrential cross-cutting) slows that you start getting to know some of the capable cast....And it's only when the characters begin revealing what they saw while unconscious that FlashForward turns interesting as it examines the interconnectivity of the human experience.
  12. Vikings is at least fun to watch, in a sword-swinging, head-chopping, maiden-despoiling sort of way.
  13. Basically, Suburgatory is a random collection of clichés drawn from such suburb-bashing works as Valley Girls, Stepford Wives, Clueless and Cougar Town, assembled without a scintilla of wit or human empathy.
  14. Legit--and I say this with a certain amount of admiration, coupled with trepidation that some new program on the spring schedule will soon prove me wrong--is the most degraded, debauched and degenerate show on TV.
  15. It’s badly written.... And it’s horribly miscast.
  16. In Californication, [Duchovny] gets to take full advantage of his low-key comic approach, and the result is irresistible. The rest of the cast matches him riff for riff, especially British actress Natascha McElhone as the disenchanted Karen and young Madeleine Martin as their 12-year-old daughter Becca.
  17. Each of them [actresses Rebecca Ferguson, Faye Marsay and Amanda Hale] stabs backs and pops bodice buttons with the necessary élan while keeping a straight face at The White Queen’s putative moral, which is that arranged marriages are corrupt and evil, while those born of attempted rape, self-mutilation and suicide are sacred and empowering.
  18. Torchwood: Miracle Day is smashing entertainment.
  19. Every attempt at treating a Big Idea seems sophomoric and irritating. Even in its look, the show lacks the elemental rawness necessary to throw its intellectual conflicts into sharp relief.
  20. A potent brew of family melodrama, crime-thriller tension and conspiratorial intrigue, Blue Bloods may actually bring some viewers back onto the sinking ship of Friday-night television.
  21. This unsettling documentary series on the cable WE network, which follows a dozen Kansas City girls through four years in their suburban high school, suggests we've come a long, hard way from "Grease."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Critic Score
    It is so good and bad all at once that you just have to watch it. Remember, it's based on a comic book. [11 June 2001, p.2C]
    • Miami Herald
  22. Until watching The Middle, I would have said it was time the sitcom concept of the madcap mom trying to balance kiddies and career got a decent burial, complete with a stake through the heart. But Heaton and producers Eileen Heisler and DeAnn Heline give the idea new life.
  23. Conceptually, this isn’t half-bad. The writing, unfortunately, is all-bad.
  24. Suburban rage may not be pretty, but in Nip/Tuck, it's always funny. [22 July 2003, p.3E]
    • Miami Herald
  25. Weeds may make you chuckle, but it wants you to gasp, and unless your name is June and you call your youngest son Beaver, it's not likely to happen. [7 Aug 2005]
    • Miami Herald
  26. Louie is so low-key that it has no discernible pulse. To say it's unfunny is accurate (profoundly so) but also beside the point: It's un-anything.
  27. Flying Blind tries to transplant the wackiness of old screwball comedies into series TV. The leads have chemistry, but Alicia's way-out, avant-garde world can be a drag. [12 Sep 1992]
    • Miami Herald
  28. Community's party animals tend to get their kicks less from bongs, grain-alcohol projectile vomiting and peeping into sorority windows than from irregular Spanish verbs and lengthy recitations of the script of The Breakfast Club, which, for the most part, is even less amusing than it sounds.
  29. Turgid and plodding, Rubicon has the pace of an industrial-training film and the lucidity of a Czech art movie with the subtitles turned off. It would have to triple its pulse to rise to the level of lethargy.
  30. Think Gray's Anatomy with unpretty people; then think of something else to watch.
  31. If the genre is no longer groundbreaking, it's still compelling in skilled hands.
  32. Swift pacing energizes the movie, and Schulman writes compelling scenes for the large cast. Many actors, who have only one scene to make an impression, meet the challenge splendidly. [11 Sept 1993, p.G1]
    • Miami Herald
  33. It's a very enjoyable hour and it's easy to get caught up in the action and the scenery and forget what we all know from the movie and the first series. But it's a tossup whether the manhunt will bring us back week after week. This time around, Kimble's chase could be much shorter. [6 Oct 2000, p.1E]
    • Miami Herald
  34. Funny and intriguing.
  35. Lovably silly.
  36. A very watchable hour of TV. [23 Sep 2002]
    • Miami Herald
  37. Try as Midler might - and she does try, doing a few physical comedy bits that would make Lucille Ball proud - even she can't overcome the reality that Bette is an idea that never developed beyond the star's reputation. [11 Oct 2000, p.1E]
    • Miami Herald
  38. The scenes of the guys driving golf balls onto the roofs of Hollywood mansions or scamming stereo dealers are funny and even sweet in a post-adolescent Porky's sort of way. [18 July 2004, p.5M]
    • Miami Herald
  39. Sons of Anarchy is bloody, disturbing and maniacally addictive.
  40. It is a powerful and often heartbreaking piece of filmmaking that ponders just how thin our veneer of civilization really can be.
  41. It's only measured against that formidable benchmark that the spinoff falls short of those expectations. It's a solid drama, but it's no Law & Order - yet...On its own, it's a good show. But it's got the genes to be great. [20 Sept 1999, p.1E]
    • Miami Herald
  42. No fictional conceit can possibly match the darkness of the Manson family. But Durham County, a series about a cop's growing realization that his bland suburban neighborhood may house a serial killer, is genuinely creepy.
  43. This can be dryly funny in small doses, but Conchords really feels less like a sitcom than a Saturday Night Live sketch stretched out to about six times its shelf-life.
  44. Derivative Pan Am may be, but that doesn't make it any less watchable.
  45. Missing here is the complexity that makes shows like "L.A. Law" or "Hill Street Blues" fun to watch. Executive producer Dick Wolf has said Law & Order is not an ensemble show. What it is is a show about police and legal procedures -- and they're recounted in almost documentary fashion. Of course, as with so much TV law, time is collapsed and these complicated procedures are neatly wrapped up by the show's conclusion. [9 Sept 1990, p.H1]
    • Miami Herald
  46. The new CBS cop drama Vegas--a cross between Gunsmoke, The Untouchables and a Sheriff Joe Arpaio reality show--is wildly entertaining.
  47. This sitcom is a loving embrace of convulsive domestic eccentricity.
  48. Putting aside for a moment questions about whether it signifies the imminent collapse of Western civilization and even the human reproductive impulse, this version of Nikita can still provide a rollicking, if slightly psychotic, good time.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Critic Score
    A good cast that includes Ellen Burstyn (Alice Doesn't Live Here Anymore) and Paul Sorvino (Law & Order) works hard to overcome a script filled with cliches. [7 Oct 2000, p.5E]
    • Miami Herald
  49. Mixing paranoia, bleak humor and post-9/11 exhaustion in a potent story-telling brew, it's one of the new television season's most promising dramas.
  50. As drama, unfortunately, it's often punchless, with a meandering narrative which, it's obvious from the first moments, cannot be contained within a single two-hour show.
  51. It's a testament to the remarkable performance of Collette that it will never occur to viewers that Tara's behavior is anything but a mortal compulsion. Her remarkable moment-to-moment morphs from teeny-bopper slut to Stepford Wife to biker brute and then back again beggar the imagination.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Pillars does a surprisingly good job of maintaining story coherence. It also avoids what might be called the Fairytale-Princess Fallacy of costume dramas; the muck and brutality of the Middle Ages are on full display.
  52. There's nothing at all subtle about the gloriously absurdist Wilfred.
  53. The Flash is one of the most pleasant surprises of the fall season. It's one of CBS' best new shows, and it is spectacular- looking. [20 Sept 1990, p.G1]
    • Miami Herald
  54. Cathy's modest conception of throwing caution to the winds mirrors the strengths of The Big C, which is affecting precisely because of its refusal to assume epic proportions.
  55. 30 Rock... is pretty darn funny, a bitterly merry comic jihad against corporate stupidity and mendaciousness.
  56. The Company is a gripping requiem for the Cold War and the men who fought it.
  57. Ben and Kate is sometimes shrill, sometimes belligerent and sometimes (well, a lot of times) merely stupid. It is never funny.
  58. It flickers with longing and resentment, vulnerability and rejection, temptation and moral erosion. It is totally absorbing television. [5 Aug 2003, p.1E]
    • Miami Herald
  59. Sheen and Cryer breathe some life into this thing, but a mercy killing might have been simpler. [22 Sept 2003, p.4E]
    • Miami Herald
  60. Neatly staged, with one surprise after another in a geometric progression of suspense, The Event's pilot episode leaves a lot of tantalizingly unanswered questions.
  61. If not exactly compelling, the pilot episode is engaging and often quirkily funny.
  62. Watching Better Off Ted is a bit like reading old Dilbert comic strips--amusing, but the punch lines seem awfully familiar.
  63. Welcome to ABC's V, the final, the most fascinating and bound to be the most controversial new show of the fall television season.
  64. The show's boorishness is exceeded only by its dissimulation; not one frame of this thing--from the diners who seem not to notice that their table is surrounded by camera crews to the melodramatically villainous managers--is remotely believable.
  65. This remake keeps the scenery and action--exploding cars and AK-47 gunfights appear to be to Honolulu what thieving politicians and senile I-95 motorists are to Miami--but adds some compelling post-9/11 wrinkles.
  66. Original in concept, intelligent in execution, it's a scruffily Steinbeckian chronicle of life at the social and economic margins.
  67. Murder and sexual predation sure look fun when they're done by pretty people in luscious gowns. Jeremy Irons is splendidly depraved as Rodrigo, and Holliday Grainger (Robin Hood) so sunnily sweet as Lucrezia that it's damn near impossible to hold a little arsenic against her.
  68. Beneath its estimable comic trappings, Go On is something larger: a meditation on what makes life worth living.
  69. The show is a rampage of frequently inappropriate and always cuttingly funny jokes about sex, drugs, money and most of all the penthouse/flophouse culture clash between the two characters.
  70. It's a stylish, elegantly plotted tale of a young woman's sociopathic thirst for vengeance.
  71. Having started with a bad premise, producers Carlton Cuse and Kerry Ehrin then made it infinitely worse by rejecting the loneliness and isolation that were the nucleus of Hitchcock’s film.
  72. No television series has been built around a less likable character, or rendered itself so strangely, compulsively watchable as a result.
  73. This truly hideous sitcom offers a postmodernist take on the 1960s comedy That Girl, in which Marlo Thomas starred as an aspiring actress afflicted with insufferable cuteness.
  74. Thomas Jane exudes a convincing odor of despair as Ray. So does Jane Adams as Tanya, one of his former one-night-stands who abandons her abysmally failed career as a poet to become his pimpette. If anything, they're too convincing; the humor in Hung tends to get blotted out by the melancholia.
  75. Ultimately, Person Of Interest is built on too cockamamie of a premise to be taken seriously.
  76. The excellent cast keeps drawing you back--especially Donald Sutherland as family patriarch Tripp Darling, whose evil glint makes even as benign a phrase as ''good morning'' sound like ''I'm going to put an ice pick through your eye.'' Even better is Krause's portrayal of Nick, layers of exasperation upon fascination upon temptation.
  77. Whether Belushi is using the firm's private detectives to follow his estranged wife, or O'Connell is sleeping with the prosecutor who's trying to put his client in jail ("You really don't like me much, do you?" she asks while taking off her blouse), the show has an irresistible outlaw quality.
  78. The smirky cynicism, savage mockery of New Age verities and prickly atheism of its lead character could have made The Mentalist fascinating (if not altogether pleasant) viewing. Instead, it turns down the same formulaic path as CBS' other police procedurals, a sort of CSI-with-a-fake-crystal-ball.
  79. The Bridge is pure melodrama, its villainous commanders and politicians practically twirling their mustaches as they plot their evil deeds. But if The Bridge won't expand your knowledge of urban-management science, it will keep you glued to the set.
  80. Bello's performance as the weather-beaten Timoney, swabbing her emotional scars with alcohol, nicotine and invective, is easily the highlight of the fall television season.
  81. O'Dowd and Garai are fascinating as they make their characters grow in opposite directions--he more steely, she more compassionate--over the course of the show.
  82. No Ordinary Family is no comic-book kiddie show but a perceptive and engaging comedy-drama about domestic dysfunction.
  83. Watching him color in the lines of his own personality is fascinating. [19 Sept 2002]
    • Miami Herald
  84. Political Animals can be slightly murky when it comes to invoking issues and ideologies. But when it comes to the microlevel of politics, the misdirection and machinations politicians employ to satisfy their own ambitions and thwart those of others, Political Animals is peerless.
  85. Classy, tender and plumb beautiful ... Old-fashioned and sweet, it is as accomplished in its way as NYPD Blue is in its. [2 Apr 1994]
    • Miami Herald
  86. Durst’s books all offer the same engaging elements that the BBC makes such excellent use of in this two-part miniseries: The claustrophobic lifeboat atmosphere of a society teetering toward its doom.
  87. Roth makes for a tartly witty hero, the mysteries are intricately plotted, and the show makes the most of the weird dynamics of an office where the boss can ferret out everybody's secrets.
  88. Dave's World is shrewdly observant. It's a success by more than a few nose hairs. [20 Sept 1993, p.6]
    • Miami Herald
  89. Its raffish ethnic and class humor takes no prisoners.
  90. Hilarious. [4 Aug 2005]
    • Miami Herald
  91. By the end of a couple of episodes, most viewers will be wishing Spielberg and his henchmen had spent more time on scripts and less on special effects, even if it meant splicing old outtakes of Barney and Friends into the action sequences.
  92. If the imitation is pale, it's also competent. And Schwartzman's wistful but inept romanticism is hard to resist.
  93. Cooper and Somerville... keep things moving.
  94. It's supposedly a wry look at the perils and pressures of parenthood. But really it's just a collection of tired cliches, reworked with weird grimaces and funny accents a la a really bad Saturday Night Live skit.
  95. To say that Love Monkey is derivative and predictable is not quite the same as saying it's bad.
  96. The Michael J. Fox Show (which debuts with back-to-back episodes) is never cloying or condescending. And any time it seems to be veering toward disease-of-the-week-movie territory, you can be sure that lampoon is on the way.

Top Trailers