Mr. Showbiz's Scores

  • Movies
For 721 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 45% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Hedwig and the Angry Inch
Lowest review score: 0 Dude, Where's My Car?
Score distribution:
721 movie reviews
  1. Wincer keeps the insubstantial story moving and the comedy light.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  2. For some viewers, this will seem a trial of predictability and unrelenting sweetness; for others, it's more than enough.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  3. Sags, lollygags, and blusters too much to sustain the what-the-hell momentum that Kitano achieves in his best movies.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  4. The voyage is never less than interesting, even when you have no idea where it could possibly go.
  5. Almost nothing happens for most of the movie.
  6. Pure, irrational, claustrophobic, gritty, unpretentious.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  7. All of the interviewees are compelling, whether proudly showing off bruises and bullet holes from on-the-job scuffles, or voicing their opinions about how the profession has changed.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  8. O
    Too much of a locker-room melodrama to make for great tragedy.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  9. The movie's most glaring flaw is that the brothers and their screenwriters, Terry Hayes and Rafael Yglesias, don't manage to preserve the secret of the Ripper's identity for nearly as long as they intend to.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  10. The cast is largely nonprofessional, and the story has the simplicity of myth.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  11. It's good enough, smart enough, and people will like it. It's also a high-concept cop-out, a convention-strangled genre movie that never zigs when your every instinct is screaming that it's about to zag.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  12. A tepid and surprisingly dull farce stamped from the "About Mary" mold.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  13. For the most part, it's when the women do the singing -- that Songcatcher really comes alive.
  14. If you're looking for refuge from summer movie bombast, it's frequently intoxicating.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  15. It's not a movie you could call dispassionate, however aimless and unfocused. It's a Molotov cocktail tossed in several directions at once.
  16. The flat, gross-out live-action bits, directed by (surprise!) Peter and Bobby Farrelly, don't jive with the zippy, Tex Avery-style animated segments, directed by former storyboard artists Piet Kroon and Tom Sito.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  17. The material it does pull off is daring and sharp.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  18. The naked, artless display of nerve and rebellious bile is altogether unique in modern movies.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  19. The wrap-up's pretty charming, as are the performances, but the film's too heavy for its soufflé-ready ingredients.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  20. Good old-fashioned romantic entertainment, just restrained enough to skirt schmaltz.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  21. Billed cleverly as a comedy from the heart that goes for the throat. If only Brooks had had the guts to avoid the schmaltz.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  22. Its emotional sweep is ultimately undercut by murky characterizations and generic plotting.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  23. Makes for compulsive viewing even though its noirish plot doesn't make a lick of sense.
  24. This fictionalized, frequently stomach-churning biography of Australian criminal Mark Chopper Read features the most bloody ear-severing scene since "Reservoir Dogs."
    • Mr. Showbiz
  25. The result is a feast for the eyes but frequently a famine for the frontal lobes, a movie of towering imagination and middling rewards.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  26. The more we realize that we're stuck in the company of a totally relentless loser, the drearier the entire experience becomes.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  27. At once arch, derivative, and, in the end, bizarrely lyrical.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  28. Mild as satire and completely unconvincing as tragicomedy.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  29. What does it say that we have a closer relationship with the car than with the characters? It says Bruckheimer.
    • Mr. Showbiz
  30. The film has an unabashed romantic tone that's matched by Wenders' usual flair for visual drama.

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