musicOMH.com's Scores

  • Music
For 3,473 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 Mr. Beast
Lowest review score: 0 Fortune
Score distribution:
3,473 music reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    For what it sets out to do, it's damn near perfect, and what higher praise is there than that?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Whether or not Shit Robot is making grooves and beats that are unique and progressive isn't the point. The whole point of his work is to embrace the glorious past and then push the necessary knobs and buttons that are commonplace today to take it to a wonderfully hip-shaking new level.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    By creating a world so comic-book vivid, each track stands and walks in its own desolate, saturnine world. But it's a world where the dead want to be alive and the alive would rather be dead. The creation of warped minds, Salem just made a monster.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It all adds up to Stern's most fully realised, most rounded album yet, and a huge step in her evolution as an artist.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's comparable to Late Of The Pier's debut Fantasy Black Channel; a lot on show but with hints of greater achievement. But Man Alive is a step up from that. It could well be their masterpiece; their scatterbrained work of art.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    WYWH should be played seasonally to stoke the nostalgic embers of summers past, for it's as equally hazy and precious as the memories it depicts.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Body Talk shows just how easily she can churn out hits more frequently than labels can process production teams.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    21
    21 really is one of the great 'break-up' albums, and the first truly impressive record of 2011. Here is a timely reminder that British soul hasn't lost its mojo.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Let England Shake, Harvey's first solo album since 2007's White Chalk, is a brutal, often difficult and always unflinching look at what terrible things happen to people when nations fight each other.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a staggering record, displaying not only a golden streak of songwriting but also a band newly energised to their cause - making it a return to form of near biblical proportions. Highly recommended.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Big Roar has been some time in coming, but it has been well worth the wait. This could finally be The Joy Formidable's year.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Mike Skinner seems to have produced a funny, sad, emotional, honest album to rank up there with his very finest work, making us fall in love with him all over again, just as he leaves us.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's an uplifting end to one of the best albums of 2011, one that marks Ghostpoet as a name to keep a very close eye on.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Julianna Barwick is crafting gorgeously effecting sounds in a way that nobody has quite heard before, far beyond the snickering Enya comparisons or the reductive ties to Eno's ambience, this isn't music for thinking or studying, this is just music for living.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Disjointed, hyperactive, experimental, whatever. Angles is the album to beat this year.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's an album that deserves the limelight, regardless of how it got there.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Wasting Light sounds like the work of a band with something to prove, rather than the work of one of the biggest rock bands in the world.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Nine Types Of Light is another strong early contender for album of the year.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While existing fans are catered to generously, the band have brought their sound on in leaps and bounds; an achievement that is testament to Mount's evolving songwriting prowess. They don't come much better than this.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    From this irrepressible debut, we can deduce that Katy B is a genuinely exciting UK urban vocal talent, the like of which we haven't seen in some time.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This isn't showing off with noise like post-rock can sometimes be accused of; it is, rather, intricate knowledge of how a leaderless band uses its flexibility to craft rises and falls that consume and envelop, making it an essential addition to anyone's list of 2011 records to own.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Helplessness Blues sees the band finally reach the top of Barringer Hill and set off in majestic flight over the sunshine blessed countryside.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As an exercise in maintaining artistic form, it's an indisputable success.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    While it stands apart, this is an evolution that will please both Wild Beasts' early adopters and the many converts that will surely follow from what is, without doubt, one of the stand out releases of the year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Past Life Martyred Saints is an album that leaves a mark.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In writing this stunning, emotive album Sarabeth Tucek has not only dealt with her own grief, but will undeniably help others in a similar situation, a perfect way to commemorate her father.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It seems Pala is Friendly Fires' successful attempt to translate their positivity-injected carnival live performances into a record. In the process, it just so happens they've delivered what deserves to be the soundtrack to the summer.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    D
    This is an album which bears repeated listening, and which deserves to become more than just a summer soundtrack; but rather one of those releases that can be revisited again and again, with each listen revealing new details and delights.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The album sees a succession of warm, hushed acoustic guitar textures provide an accommodating bed in which Nadler's flawless vocals can rest. The hazy sound and crepuscular feel to parts of the album recall fellow vocalist Hope Sandoval, or occasionally a more fragile and more gothic Cat Power.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Best listened to in silence on a home stereo with cinematic projection; this is a remarkable achievement from Johannsson, and a welcome change from the string-drenched sound that has become ubiquitous in modern film scores.