New Musical Express (NME)'s Scores

  • Music
For 4,297 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 52% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Skeleton Tree
Lowest review score: 0 Two
Score distribution:
4297 music reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Light Up Gold is one of the best debut albums you'll hear all year.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The emotive finesse of ‘Cherry Blossoms’ might further the calls for a shoulder to blub on, but chugging full-band showstopper ‘Ramona’ shows Yellen’s songwriting to be as rich as his voice.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Holy Fire brings new words to mind. Sharp. Emotive. Massive.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Exhilarating and violent.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A masterpiece that merges the experimentation and freedom of their side projects with Cave’s most tender songcraft.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s wrought with haunting, high-stakes emotions, but the strength of Scott’s voice means it never feels melodramatic or plainly vulnerable.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Child Of Lov may have started off as a shadowy enigma, but now is when Cole Williams lays his cards on the table. Turns out he was hiding a royal flush.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Once I Was An Eagle sets a high bar.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Josh Homme and his all-star pals prove the virtue of taking your sweet time on a record that’s as self-assured as it is damn sexy.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    As Britain suffers from youth unemployment and economic crisis, our greatest currency is the chime of a golden tune. Peace have delivered 10 of them.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s a tightrope across a canyon down which many a pie-eyed baggy daredevil has fallen. Jagwar Ma make it look effortless.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Gratuitous filth, basically. It’s funny, but also a pity, because Yeezus is so tight, so bold, that with a few tweaks Kanye could’ve made his rock for the ages. As it is, he’ll have to settle for one of the best records of the year.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One of the reasons Major Arcana works so well is because it’s addictive and fun, which could explain how these characters got into such a mess in the first place.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is wild music, a celestial cabaret that absorbs and unsettles.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s a more honest, human, realistic--and totally wonderful--guide to life.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Lee’s lyrics are sometimes sentimental to the point of potentially seeming trite, but they’re logical for a situation where love and pain have become so overwhelming that simple statements seem the most trustworthy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Burial’s success has brought with it imitators, but with this EP he’s outwitted them all by introducing a gloriously widened palate to his music that is both instantly familiar and shockingly unlikely.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is a deeply personal record, unequivocally sensual.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Burn is her first album recorded with a full band, though the resultant fuzzily glam swagger doesn’t forsake her wise style, instead coming off like Bill Callahan covering T Rex.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The result is an LP that feels more in sync with contemporary music than ever before. There are notes here of Oneohtrix Point Never, Clams Casino, and Tim Hecker. Crucially, though, Present Tense roams a landscape which couldn’t have been charted by anyone else.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Like Justin Vernon before him, with Lost In The Dream Adam Granduciel seems to be heading for things far bigger than anyone could ever have expected. This is one War On Drugs that might just succeed.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Mac knows better than to let his bellyaching get in the way of everyone else's good time--instead, he’s simply dialled down the quirk and written his best record yet.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is cold-blooded revenge pop that strikes like a shard of shattered plate to the heart.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s an insane and challenging, ambitious and exceptional work of art.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Just as Moz's stance as a one-man outsider army and ringleader of the tormentors is restated, so is his standing as the godfather of indie disaffection and despair.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    In spite of all the terror and uncertainty, it's the warmth that lingers.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The doomed relationship cycle in eternal motion or the sound of a heart that won’t stay mended, Honeyblood is visceral pop music giving its prettiest snarl.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's clever, brave and seamless enough to become a classic.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They have returned hungry and wired to shake us out of our digital comas.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    His outfit have returned with an album that skirts close to perfection in its 35 minutes of glorious madness and transcendent, George Harrison-like guitar solos.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s heavenly, in its own troubled way.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This Is My Hand should see her join him, her other collaborators and St Vincent in the US experimental pop pantheon.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Syro is amazing: bug-eyed, banging rave that sounds quintessentially Aphex while not quite sounding like anything he’s done before.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Our Love, then, is the moment it all came together for Caribou.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Rips is a reminder of rock’s glorious communal potential.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Cranking the urgency and confrontation of last year's self-titled debut to neck-breaking intensity, RTJ2 is an urgent, paranoid album for a violent, panicked time.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Complex, original and even sincere, it’s a brilliant new departure.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Hum is all feel, no bullshit, and it truly gets under your skin.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A diverse but wholly coherent set of songs, this spaced-out odyssey is well worth the trip.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    They’re too wilfully mad to emulate Tame Impala’s success, but if you’re after a freaking out, King Gizzard & The Lizard Wizard’s outrageous noise deserves attention.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The good--no, the astonishing--news is that this constantly engrossing record repays a decade and a half's faith and patience. D'Angelo has scuttled down the digital chimney with an early Christmas gift with long-lasting rewards: not just one of the best records of 2014, but one that will stay with you throughout next year, too.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s heavy, assured and profound--a terrific record alone, but also one that sits in the Sleater-Kinney catalogue naturally, like they’ve never been away.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Written around the time Tillman got hitched to this girlfriend, it's a hugely ambitious, caustically funny album about the redemptive possibilities of love, and being heartily sick of your own bullshit.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Closer ‘Sea Of Trees’ is as impressive, its restrained riff suddenly smothered by an almighty dirge. It’s a fitting climax to a record that unsettles from start to finish.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    One of Sufjan’s most fat-free and consistently stunning records, but also his darkest.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    The Great Pretenders is an emotional, emboldened triumph.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This isn’t so much a progression as a rebirth.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It’s lyrically dark and has the musical aggression to back it up.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Nielson strides away from the woozy Beefheart-indebted psychedelia of ‘II’ and its self-titled 2011 predecessor, and vividly expands every single aspect of the UMO sound.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It may be titled From Kinshasa, but this record could easily be from the future.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Less has always been more with Smith, and the success of In Colour lies in his gift for melding together very few elements to create songs that are original, surprising and highly effective.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A joyous surge of drums, guitars, wild brass and potent Spanish-English vocals from powerhouse frontwoman Victoria Ruiz.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    La Priest, he’s made one of the debuts of the year.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    With High, they’ve recorded an almost perfect 30 minutes of indie-punk. There’s no flabbiness, no million-dollar production that adds nothing to the songs, no bloated guitar lines or pointless drum fills and nothing that even comes close to seeming in any way meaningless.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    An outstanding (dare I say ‘perfect’) debut.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Plaid's digitally inspired genius is to make electronic noises and the odd sample sound sad and celebratory, while occupying a spot on the dancefloor several galaxies away from Ibiza's gonzo techno
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    First, the good news: 'Celebrity' is pretty damn fine too.... The bad news is that 'Celebrity' definitely shows signs of that discontent that all boyband members begin to feel after a while, and it's this which might well put some fans off.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is a crisp, focused wobble through a primarily 'Philophobia'-derived set with drummer Dave Gow and bassist Gary Miller adding crucial propulsive qualities.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In this slim volume of three-chord thrashing there's proof that while punk may reside in middle age, in some quarters its vital signs have never shown more strongly.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Common has just gone way, way off the hip-hop map.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A clear progression from 1997's broody 'Vanishing Point' and 2000's abrasive 'Xtrmntr', the seventh Primals album is genuinely their most diverse and consistently thrilling since 'Screamdelica'.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    'I Might Be Wrong' sounds significantly better than both of the studio albums that spawned it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Every note of 'Rock Action' wins every fight they've ever started, touched with an imagination and awareness of the potential of sound that puts them so far up on the moral high ground they're almost lost in the clouds.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album so autonomous and remote it sounds like it's being beamed from a deep-space probe.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In a world where a cheap squirt of brass is enough to equal "a new direction", the Super Furries' free-range ideas-farming is a vital antidote to the preservative-pumped junk that curdles music's bloodflow.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The absence of quirky samples and lame big beats make it all sound, right now, strangely radical.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ...a spontaneity here that replaces the formality of tradition with something more vital. Like a snapshot's moment captured, the gap between composition and recording seems to have been reduced to nothing, and it's here that the group hit their mark.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Easily their finest record yet, a genre-shrugging masterpiece of delicate musicianship and warm feeling.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An album of impossibly adorable disco - Star Wars "ping p-p-p-ping ping" bits, cheesy synths, George Clinton (!...hmm) workouts... all delivered in a slightly unsettlingly ersatz kitschness, half-hinted ironies, indietastic samples, hip-hop phrasings and The Asian Influence seductive throughout.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    ESG remain a no-wave New York group unlike any other.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Their most intriguing, beautiful and dazzling record to date.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A roducer's album in the best sense, showcasing the personal and lyrical over flashy technique. [Review of UK version]
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The immaculately chiselled 'Daybreaker' is so beautiful and distant that it almost isn't there at all.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like the works of other great swooners from Cole Porter to The Divine Comedy, 'Poses' is held together by its maker's maniacal attention to detail and conceptual strength.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    They can still write the most incredibly beautiful songs. [23 Oct 2004, p.49]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Startling from the first listen... the band are heavier, more menacing, more rhythmic than ever. [19 Jun 2004, p.55]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As airbrushed as an Athena poster, 'Alphabetical' is nonetheless an emotional experience. [19 Jun 2004, p.57]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Whether or not you'd want to listen to it more than once depends on your pain threshold, but those 45 minutes will be among the most terrifying of your life, guaranteed. [13 Nov 2004, p.56]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is an incredibly sharp return.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Like Missy Elliott, the Beasties are reimagining hip-hop--what it was, what it is, what it can be. [12 Jun 2004, p.47]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Those waiting for another record as challenging as 'Vitalogy' will be left disappointed. But 'Riot Act' is the sound of a band entering a powerful middle-age. They still deserve your attention.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    In making a record with such universal themes of love and hate, and sounding so pissed off in the process, Brody has inadvertently made herself the most important new rock star in the world.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's full-on rock carnage. [6 Nov 2004, p.59]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    As his musical repertoire has expanded from minimalist folk to occasionally playful pop, so has his tolerance for the foibles of the flesh. 'Dongs Of Sevotion', from its silly title to its intermittent flashes of tenderness and humour, is the proof.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The most brilliantly ambitious record of the year.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Having already redefined garage last time around, he's conjured up an album equal parts R Kelly, Ali G and Terence Trent D' Arby, which will only send him further into the stratosphere.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The immediate reference point would be a Swedish Coral to the power of ten--but it's more mental, more hippy and psychedelic. [14 May 2005, p.67]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An enormous, symphonic, sprawling, highly ambitious, far-reaching work of wonder. [17 Jul 2004, p.48]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It works in the same way that Doves' 'Lost Souls' did; that is, by inviting us to bed down in its sumptuously familiar lyrical folds while offering us a warm mug of Something A Bit Different.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's a blessing that the surrogate mum to the hip-hop youth of America is out there pushing for sounds as deranged, commercial, newly kinetic, and socially risque as those licking your ears in 'X-tasy' and 'Slap! Slap! Slap!'.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    'Under Construction' is stuck all over with shocks and surprises, more than enough to keep the rogue-scientist glitchmasters who mutated 'Get Ur Freak On' in mischief for months.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    While they still sound pretty much like Neil Young if he'd heard an Aphex Twin record, the anxieties that '...Slump' articulated have been replaced by frontman Jason Lytle's desire to address more simple matters.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    'Masquerade' is a mighty, ego-free album that doesn't need to shout to be heard.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    'Mary Star Of The Sea' has that kind of miracle-working effect: a euphoric and consistent hour of genetically-tweaked stadium rock that re-establishes Billy Corgan as a great, rather than ridiculous, frontman.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Sounds as if it was recorded in a hermetically sealed ballroom by a group of misanthropic, jazz-obsessed weird-beards.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    With this heavy payload of imagery, it's a miracle that Sparklehorse's third album of backwoods blues hasn't ended up a junk shop of Southern Gothic clichés. Old dog Tom Waits even wades in, hollering like an incestuous uncle on 'Dog Door', while Linkous' rusty cabin music creaks insalubriously beneath. But that's just the first of many wonders of this exceptional record.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Nailed to the dancefloor by Flea-like bassist Pat Nature, and dragged up to date by hip-hop beats and random electronica, musically Liars are taut as a tightrope.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    FSOL fans may not be impressed. But for connoiseurs of sprawling, loony progtronica, this other-worldly masterpiece is so far out you need a telescope to see it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These blow-dried disco numbers are unmistakably well-toned. [18 Sep 2004, p.65]
    • New Musical Express (NME)