New Musical Express (NME)'s Scores

  • Music
For 3,920 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 46% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Music review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 These Were The Earlies
Lowest review score: 0 Streets Of Gold
Score distribution:
3,920 music reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Swans' bleakness is beset with great beauty, black wings to another world.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Tracks like 'Mortar Remembers You' convey the bleakness of the situation ("I had to build a room to contain all the panic"), but Campbell's voice and the persistent whirling synths infuse the desolation with compelling energy.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    It's expansively, ecstatically excellent for many of the same reasons as The Field's previous two: blissful, loop-based hymns at the intersection between shoegazing, trance and minimal techno.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    All in all, this is merely promising rather than masterful. [14 Oct 2006, p.35]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Old
    Tracks like 'Torture' borrow far too liberally from A$AP Rocky's cloud-rap aesthetic to be considered original. But otherwise, Old is a perfect example of why 2013 is a very exciting time for hip-hop.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Tempest is a relentless exploration of bleakness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This is the side of Jack White III he's happy to show the world right now, and it's absolutely fascinating to behold.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Sounds as if it were recorded on one perfectly wasted afternoon. [22 Oct 2005, p.43]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    He has an uncanny feel for the triangulation of folk, jazz and blues that came from the fleet fingers of Bert Jansch and John Fahey back in the ’60s.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The resulting remixes and medleys, as heard on equipment that probably costs more than your house at Abbey Road, could make you weep with joy. It may not sound as good on a common-or-garden stereo, but you'll still mist up a bit.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Ultimately, this album is the sound of the future.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Open Your Heart is breezier and more tuneful than its predecessor, but this is very relative.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Skeleton's only real weak spot: moments of genuinely inventive instrumentation and musical ambition are in abundance here, but somehow the songs feel less than the sum of their parts.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's every ounce of Idlewild's potential fulfilled at once.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Hot Sauce Committee Part Two is undoubtedly a good record. It's just that in the Beasties' case, merely being good doesn't seem, well, y'know, good enough.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    These songs contain the record's protest element as well as its exemplary musicality: heartbreaking soul choruses, classical samples and '80s rocksteady rhythms.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    If White Men really recalls anything, it’s those early TV On The Radio records made before Dave Sitek had figured out what he was doing--and you can take that as a sincere compliment.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Although inescapably discomfiting, the music’s complex textures keep the listener snared.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    If all you can see is a tangle of influences then you're standing too close to the picture, and when Skying's visions come into focus, it not only reaffirms that Primary Colours was far from a fluke, but that they could go so much further.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Though occasionally too florid, this bass cat’s on the path to majesty.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    This is an album to fall in love to, to break up to, to drown sorrows to, or to bounce around to. One-hit wonders? Well, the wonders part is right.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    Burial’s success has brought with it imitators, but with this EP he’s outwitted them all by introducing a gloriously widened palate to his music that is both instantly familiar and shockingly unlikely.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Eye Contact is a piercing glimpse into an imagined Utopia of infinite possibility, as if they've focused their years of digital psychedelic jamming into a single beam, and fired it beyond a horizon peered at in vain by their peers.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Somehow they’ve retained their pop nous, making for an album that’s unique, but maddeningly all over the place.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    Moments of beauty cut through the bleakness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The devil be praised that, rather than visiting the shrink or brothel to deal with his sexual dysfunction, the Grinderman went to the studio instead.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    Despite the rock, you can still dance to it. [Review of U.S. version]
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    A real-life pop record. Well, not pop in the Girls Aloud sense of the word obviously, more in the drop-dead, fuzz-box brilliant 'Here Comes Your Man' sense. [10 Jul 2004, p.48]
    • New Musical Express (NME)
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Critic Score
    It's genuinely surprising, beautifully wrought and announces TNP as one of the most powerful artistic forces in Britain today.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    The simple fact she's intent on change makes her and the rest of her career infinitely more intriguing.