New Orleans Times-Picayune's Scores

  • Movies
For 597 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 1.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Gravity
Lowest review score: 20 Only God Forgives
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 41 out of 597
597 movie reviews
  1. A punch-drunk tale whose fitful ramble from Jerry Springer-style family seaminess to "Rocky"-like triumph is elevated enormously by knockout performances.
  2. This is a dirty, stinky Western -- the kind where authenticity is the guiding artistic hand and where a layer of filth and grime have seemingly settled over everything but the popcorn in your lap.
  3. To be clear: Despite the holiday flavor, and despite the pint-sized hero, this is no kids' movie. There is swearing. There is blood. There is an army of 180 very nude Santas coursing through the snow. That's not the kind of thing Frank Capra ever could have dreamed of -- and that change of pace is exactly what makes Rare Exports a rare, if unexpected, holiday treat.
  4. Boasting a rock-solid academic architecture, Bhutto is a film bursting at the seams with gravitas.
  5. Feels like a movie that belongs in June or July, with all the other comic book fare. But I'll gladly take it now, no matter what the calendar says.
  6. Part "The Great Escape" and part "Lawrence of Arabia, " Weir's epic The Way Back is ambitious in scope, grand in vision and rich with examples of the resilience of the human spirit.
  7. Like the original, it is a moody, atmospheric film, one boasting significantly more depth than your typical blow-'em-up.
  8. Slowly becomes a thoughtful and interesting deconstruction and demythologizing of American celebrity.
  9. Not the deepest stuff, but thought-provoking all the same -- and entertaining to boot.
  10. Complemented by striking, well-conceived visuals, in Fukunaga's hands Bronte's tale of love and woe becomes one well worth repeating.
  11. There are moments when the freak-show elements of the film threaten to overpower its message, but that message is such a fascinating one -- and the debate an important one as well -- that The Elephant in the Living Room manages to overcome them.
  12. The kind of indie gem that doesn't come around nearly often enough -- and, when they do, often not enough people go to see them.
  13. If you're a mom or dad bringing your own little primates to the movie, that's a good thing.
  14. It's a film for patient moviegoers. But for those moviegoers, it stands to be a rewarding experience.
  15. It is a thoughtful film, a serious one, and one that is sneakily affecting.
  16. The movie is quietly affecting, as Rush offers a moving and rewarding yarn about the need to move on in the face of personal tragedy, and about the strength of human connections.
  17. What it lacks in style, however, it more than makes up for in substance, as Shearer -- as smart as he is funny -- has assembled a vital and admirably accessible post-mortem on Hurricane Katrina.
  18. Spurlock banks on his charm and likability -- and it's that charm and likability that make The Greatest Movie Ever Sold so much fun to watch.
  19. Their story, as told by Pooley, also is a touching and quietly meaningful one, built around themes of tolerance, self-acceptance and unconditional love.
  20. McGlynn's film clocks in at just a shade under two hours, which normally would be a little long for a documentary. In this case, the length not only is warranted but welcomed.
  21. So what we have is a movie that will make at least two important groups happy. New Orleans boosters can cheer Green Lantern for its local roots and for the possibility that the inevitable future installments could return to town. And the purists can cheer, knowing that Campbell and crew have done Green Lantern justice.
  22. The fact that there are so many good comic bits here allowed Kasdan to assemble a great comic cast.
  23. The Beaver also has a tendency to slip around as it finds its footing. But then the powerful third act comes and Foster, with Gibson's help, hits it home.
  24. Gets considerable gas from the fact that Bateman, Sudeikis and Day so convincingly play three idiotic pals. The real fun, though, is in the fantastic supporting cast.
  25. Best of all, Disney seems to understand the limits of a preschooler's attention span.
  26. There's meaning, great meaning, in Susser's wonderfully oddball little film.
  27. The engine that really makes Crazy Stupid Love go is the same one that has made Ficarra and Requa's films to this point so appealing: While they thrust their characters into outrageous situations, they always keep things grounded in real, relatable emotion.
  28. It's his film's metamorphosis into something else -- something every bit as dark, and every bit as intriguing -- that will keep viewers planted in their seats, and, at times, perched on the edges of them.
  29. It's easy to forget that you're watching a sci-fi film at all. That's because it's just a shade or two from not even being a sci-fi film.
  30. A movie with undeniable melancholy underpinnings, but Bertuccelli wisely avoids overdoing the drama to nurse cheap tears from her audience.

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