New Times (L.A.)'s Scores

  • Movies
For 639 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Buena Vista Social Club
Lowest review score: 0 Jeepers Creepers
Score distribution:
639 movie reviews
  1. Released in 1962, it was pretty clearly the most intelligent spectacular within living memory. On its 40th anniversary, it's even better.
  2. Not to be missed. And pay close attention to the finale. It's a genuine surprise.
  3. Maniacally funny. It remains neck and neck with "Young Frankenstein" as Brooks' best film.
  4. Probably like nothing you've ever seen before. In a cool world, it would be guaranteed not only the Best Animated Feature Oscar, but Best Picture as well.
    • New Times (L.A.)
  5. We're told that this new version is tweaked and enhanced, with the E.T. puppet digitally smoothed out, and the guns in the meanies' hands removed (silly, but bravo).
    • New Times (L.A.)
  6. One of the finest qualities of Amadeus is that it reminds us of those rare occasions when an Oscar sweep is actually merited.
  7. De Sica's 1952 neorealist masterpiece; it's a stark snapshot in which all is revealed about the "daily life of mankind," as the director once offered by way of description.
  8. The film succeeds as massive, astonishing entertainment; verily, enthralling us is its chief goal.
  9. The pacing is slow, but the film is entrancing and earns a permanent place in the viewer's mind.
  10. An authentic and thrilling glimpse into Inuit culture and tradition.
    • New Times (L.A.)
  11. Coppola and Murch have balanced their new edit with grace notes of sweetness, elegance and eroticism, and the payoff is grand, providing both a reprieve from the multiple blitzkriegs and a break in the monotony of the cruise up the Nung.
  12. For most people, four hours pushes the outer comfort limits for theatrical viewing. My Voyage to Italy is well worth the time, but bringing along a thermos of espresso isn't a bad idea either.
  13. For all its mystery and its stylistic finesse, there is something vaguely plodding about The Sweet Hereafter.
  14. What we have here is an historical document of inestimable value, describing in no uncertain terms the terrible and beautiful times before AIDS.
  15. Altman's technique also allows his huge cast to act up a storm, in the best sense. Gosford Park has roughly half the best actors in England in it.
  16. Despite its two-and-a-half hour running time, the movie flies by, so absorbing are its story, songs and stars.
  17. Scorsese's rockudrama withstands big-screen scrutiny some 24 years after its initial release.
  18. Despite the presence of several sublimely cracked actors and some of the most abrasive white-trash caricatures since "Raising Arizona," Birch totally owns this movie.
  19. In elevating bawdy teen farce to political metaphor without squeezing the fun out, Alfonso Cuarón has pulled off a nice little miracle.
    • New Times (L.A.)
  20. This film made Dietrich a star, and it's easy to see why: Slightly more voluptuous than in her later films, Dietrich is the embodiment of the pleasures of the flesh.
  21. A subtle mood piece in which a man's collapse is examined so rigorously that one almost hopes for a murder to come along and break the tension.
    • New Times (L.A.)
  22. The plot may be nothing, but the film is something indeed.
  23. I still think the first is the best in the series, but I'm in the minority: Number two has a stronger following among the legions of Hong Kong movie buffs.
  24. The confusing, demanding role finally brings the actor home, and us with him.
  25. If Dubus' work always resembled some sort of literary therapy session, as has often been said, then Field's version requires grief counseling. It is, at times, that devastating.
  26. A beautifully acted, carefully written meditation on one woman's grief, the enigma of imagination, the persistence of desire and -- let's face it -- the power of denial.
  27. It's an amazing story, but, in addition to its intrinsic interest, the Shackleton expedition has another remarkable draw: Crewman Frank Hurley had brought along not only still cameras, but a movie camera as well, providing us with an extraordinary record of the ship's voyage.
  28. Offers an enormous amount of pure silly fun for the entire non-nuclear family, no matter what gender they may be.
  29. The film is a whirlwind blur, a kinetic thrill ride through the industrial backwater that was one of punk and post-punk's most fertile Promised Lands: Manchester.
    • New Times (L.A.)
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The audience responds to Out of Sight the way Jack and Karen do to each other. Instantly we like the way it looks, moves, and sounds. Ultimately we like how it makes us feel.

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