New York Daily News' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
For 5,990 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 5.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 A Hard Day's Night (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 Battleship
Score distribution:
5,990 movie reviews
  1. This bold movie may sound like a stunt, but it’s so much more than that. Linklater is an effortless, genial auteur, and his passions are woven through “Dazed and Confused,” “School of Rock” and the “Before Sunrise” trilogy. Here, his mellow groove becomes an everyday rhythm.
  2. It's impossible to imagine how the action genre would have developed without Akira Kurosawa's watershed 1954 movie Seven Samurai.
  3. It's a white-knuckler all the way, with most of that tension coming from the smallest facial expressions exchanged in uneasy silence between compatriots who knew what they were getting into, but were nevertheless unprepared for the moral and emotional fallout of their patriotic actions.
  4. The movie elevated the basic gangster picture into what became known as the niche genre of poetic realism. And, aside from Garbo, never have key lights on a star's face caused so much swooning among fans.
  5. A critic trots out the word "masterpiece" at his own peril, but there it is.
  6. It took the German restorers four years to ready this print using dupe negatives and old prints found in archives around the world. Their work speaks for itself. Each frame of this classic is drop-dead stunning, the more so now that the movie no longer hiccups its way across the screen.
  7. This year’s foreign language Oscar scandal – there is always at least one – is the snub of director Cristian Mungiu’s disturbing, masterful realist drama following two college roommates as they carry out plans for one’s black market abortion in Communist Romania.
  8. McQueen has made a film comparable to “Schindler’s List” — art that may be hard to watch, but which is an essential look at man’s inhumanity to man. It is wrenching, but 12 Years a Slave earns its tears in a way few films ever do.
  9. A gorgeous, wonderfully inventive computer-animated comedy.
  10. As joyously energetic now as the day it arrived.
    • New York Daily News
  11. A thrill ride with a brain.
  12. A work deeper than its nickname, "The Facebook Movie," hints at - coils around your brain. Weeks after seeing it, moments from it will haunt you.
  13. What finally sticks in the mind about "ZDT" is its precision. What the film says about getting information from terrorism suspects in an era of high-tech surveillance depends on your point of view. What is unquestionable is how powerful its full scope is.
  14. Together and apart, Hatami and Maadi are magnetic. Hatami, a star in Iranian cinema, lets us see Simin's intelligence and defiant sense of self-worth often with nothing more than a gesture.
  15. Delpy and Hawke, who’ve invested this trilogy with the fine shadings of life lived, do extraordinary things with small moments.
  16. Turns everything we know about the contemporary world on its head, and substitutes it with one in which spirits, monsters, magicians and animals mix it up in a carnival of energy, good humor and freewheeling illusion.
  17. Beaming back on screens for its 20th anniversary, holds up spectacularly well.
    • New York Daily News
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    What you'll remember most will be Renner's remarkably complex commander. By the time we finally figure him out, it's become clear we've witnessed a star-making performance, in a movie that deserves to stand as one of the defining films of the decade.
  18. Rotates around a rusty little robotic hero who's built, as the movie is, with such emotion, brains and humor that whole universes exist in his whirring tones and binocular eyes.
  19. The best comedy of 2004. In fact, it's so far the best movie of the year.
  20. The most emotionally satisfying because, in addition to having both more intimate drama and more spectacular battles, it resolves all of the issues raised before.
  21. Assayas - whose previous work, though noteworthy, never hinted at this kind of ambition - gives the film a journalistic quality, while admitting that only a recombination of facts and fiction could do the story justice. It certainly results in explosive viewing.
  22. Small victories that turn into defeats, long walks to gain little ground, little wounds that get deeper every day - growing old is a war, and movies rarely go there. Michael Haneke's amazing, dignified Amour is the exception.
  23. Handsome, passionate and fun. It's everything we go to the movies for.
  24. "Amadeus is about as close to perfection as movies get," I wrote in 1984. Now, it's 20 minutes closer.
  25. An evocative vision of self-destruction, a gorgeously crafted time capsule, and a fantastic showcase for Oscar Isaac in the title role.
  26. Passes like an evening spent with friends.
  27. Take us on an indelible tour through the highest and lowest points of the human experience.
  28. There is never a shortage of options if you're looking for an intimate foreign drama about family bonds. But the eloquent insights of director Claire Denis stand alone.
  29. Universally appealing story that plays as well now as it did on opening day a half-century ago. Maybe better.
  30. With a grating symphonic score by ­Radiohead's Jonny Greenwood and the constant sense of danger following Plainview, "Blood" does not release its grip on the audience until its last, bizarrely crazy minutes.
  31. For Hobbitués and adventure fans of all other ages, it's the year's best thrill ride -- maybe the best film.
    • New York Daily News
  32. While the vocal performances of Hanks, Allen and company make up a perfect ensemble, and its visual leaps astound, TS3's real power sneaks up on you.
  33. It's a deceptively simple tale that tackles, serenely and with surprising humor, issues of gender, power, custom and change.
  34. Don't miss The Fast Runner. If you do, you will deprive yourself of not only one of the most intriguing feature-film projects in decades and enough plain-spoken anthropology for three credits at Harvard, but one of the most flat-out entertaining movies of the year.
    • New York Daily News
  35. An insanely delicious animated feature.
  36. If you've got the patience, this is still one of the all-time exercises in cinematic cool.
  37. In some ways, The Queen is a comedy of manners - bad, good and archaic. The formal bowing and scraping surrounding Her Majesty is as hilarious as it is (apparently) accurate.
  38. The film is a mystery uncovered like a detective story, wrapped in a love letter.
  39. "Chocolat" was just a warmup for the stunning display of the male form against National Geographic settings in her new Beau Travail.
    • New York Daily News
  40. This animated documentary, from former Israeli soldier Ari Folman, blends both tactics to devastating effect. Perhaps only animation could give us the distance that makes his subject bearable: the personal cost of his own participation in the 1982 Lebanon War.
  41. If the structure is a tad out of whack, "No Country" does not lack for action or suspense. Some of the scenes of Chigurh's stalking of Moss are nearly unbearably tense. Bring your worry beads.
  42. A fascinating and informative, if sometimes stodgy, documentary about the most secret wing of Israel's anti-espionage unit.
  43. Steven Spielberg's best war film -- and one of the two or three best movies the director has made.
  44. Rahim and Arestrup are both so outstanding that if this were an English-language film, they'd probably be nominated for Oscars, too.
  45. Amid all the hokey hill stuff, Lawrence's hard eyes and manner draw us in.
  46. A juicy noir stew of amorality that's the best thing since "Chinatown."
  47. The clear powerhouse in the new film is a scene where Kurtz, speaking with the twisted coherence of the true paranoid-schizophrenic, uses Time magazine articles and other references to justify his actions.
  48. Surges forward with barely a respite. It's like watching a propane factory burn, waiting for the tanks inside to explode, and when they do, we're right in the middle of it.
  49. Her
    Will you relate more to the bitter, or embrace the sweet? The choice itself is Jonze’s ultimate gift to us: an invitation to leave his film ready to communicate, debate and, most crucially of all, connect.
  50. This stirring children's movie about separation anxiety is swimming with comic references only adults will catch, thus greatly expanding the potential audience.
  51. It's irrefutably art, and undeniably vital.
  52. A hive of broad, brilliant performances.
  53. Gloriously inventive, delightfully nutty comic treasure is unlike anything you've ever seen. It's lunatic.
  54. The naturalistic dialogue is a masterful bit of writing, credited to Linklater and his "Sunrise" co-writer Kim Krizan, as well as to the two stars.
  55. Clever, buoyant and surprisingly human.
  56. A great movie -- and the best movie ever about the '70s rock era.
  57. As inventive as "Being John Malkovich," as psychologically quirky as "Ghost World" and as honest as the day is long.
  58. No matter which floor you're on, the huge cast is extraordinary, and Altman gives the actors free rein to bring their characters to life despite such close quarters.
  59. I wouldn't recommend the movie to anyone, but if the families of the victims take something positive from it, as their cooperation with Greengrass suggests they do, that's justification enough.
  60. A sunny-looking movie about the darkest paranoia.
  61. This extraordinary film refracts truth through the prism of memory, until what you get is a tragedy of Shakespearean dimensions, full of sacrifice and betrayal.
  62. There’s a great fever-dream quality to David O. Russell’s American Hustle that instantly reels you in.
  63. The black-and-white animation won't dazzle your eyes, but everything else about Marjane Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud's adaptation of Satrapi's graphic comic book series Persepolis will hold you in its thrall.
  64. Can’t-look-away stuff, though it’s tough to believe your eyes and ears.
  65. A smartly written, confidently directed film that delivers big laughs while developing two of the year's most earnest characters and some of its most rewarding sentiments.
  66. After all the observations on heartache, politics, art, commerce, passion, identity, mortality, even mental health, six hours begin to seem downright compact.
  67. Except for Hempf, every character is under incredible duress, and the performances are exceptional. With his first feature, an Oscar nominee for foreign-language film, von Donnersmarck has certainly left his mark.
  68. The most gorgeous movie of the year. This smashing martial-arts romance from Chinese director Zhang Yimou is stunning in other ways, too, like the eroticism that ripples just beneath the surface.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    This adaptation of a 10th-century folk tale is less sumptuous than Ghibli maestro Hiyao Miyazaki’s surreal classics, yet it’s also more affecting than most of them. An allegory about the irrecoverable joys of childhood, it may make parents hug their kids now.
  69. You can reexperience the humor and magic -- and the essence of Streisand -- in this William Wyler classic.
  70. History has made his midair stroll meaningful, but the film shows how even then, everyone - from Petit to his accomplices to the cops who were waiting for him atop the North Tower - recognized the stunt's crazy poetry.
  71. An usually insightful rendering of an ordinary family, Hirokazu Kore-eda's contemplative Japanese drama is the sort of movie that makes its greatest impact long after you've seen it.
  72. Though Borat has been likened to "Jackass," there's a huge difference. The "Jackass" movies are about extreme stunts. Borat is about interaction and gullibility, and its success is unique to both Cohen and to this one-time-only movie.
  73. The most compelling and least partisan of all the Iraq documentaries.
  74. Ida
    Ida is photographed in gorgeous black-and-white cinematography. A deep focus allows every corner of the simple, serene compositions to be seen clearly. The economy of story and dialogue extends to the running time — at barely 90 minutes, the movie feels full, yet free of excess.
  75. So is he a martyred patriot or a misguided traitor? And is it possible he’s both? Poitras comes down firmly on one side, and she makes a strong case. But the movie would have been stronger still if she’d acknowledged the alternative view.
  76. In this film, a single word is worth more than all the expensive effects imaginable.
  77. A masterpiece? Probably. Ingenious? Absolutely! Unforgettable? I'll see you at the 10th-year anniversary.
  78. "Letters" isn't about numbers or the battle or even the morality of war. It's about the sanctity of life and how we value our own.
  79. Once isn't especially complex, but the chemistry between its appealing leads (who contribute to the lovely score) feels deeply true. You'd have to look awfully hard to find such sincerity in a Hollywood romance.
  80. Funny, insightful, unpredictable and blessed with pitch-perfect performances, Ghost World is one of the year's best movies.
  81. Like watching an American teen-sex comedy through a glass darkly.
    • New York Daily News
  82. What "Capote" fails to reveal to the audience is the sense of a homoerotic attraction between the author and Perry Smith (Clifton Collins Jr.). It is more than implied that one exists, but there isn't a scene between them that supports it or even makes it believable.
  83. It’s undeniably thrilling to watch Gonzalez Iñárritu and Keaton aiming so high. Whenever they’re brave enough to leap into the unknown, Birdman soars.
  84. Though made 31 years after D-Day, the dramatic scenes have the period look of a '40s movie, which links them perfectly with the stunning archival footage.
  85. A kind of historical detective story made up of haunting montages, including a theater performance featuring a heartbroken musician that's absolutely chilling.
  86. Overlong and dramatically thin.
  87. This is melodrama with broad theatrical flourishes, but Dietrich's sensuality is still a natural wonder, and with a new print, the Film Forum run offers a rare opportunity to see it big-screen-size.
  88. A well-crafted indictment of the dark side of the modern work ethic.
    • New York Daily News
  89. The strangely mesmerizing dance contest in "Pulp Fiction" was born of Jean-Luc Godard's 1964 New Wave classic Band of Outsiders.
  90. Even those who've long noted Polley's intelligence on screen will be amazed by the perception she displays as a filmmaker.
  91. Ferguson doesn't aim to entertain; he wants answers, and talks to many of the enabling weasels.
  92. The Two Towers moves faster, covers more ground, has more action and -- with the introduction of the marvelous character Gollum -- packs some much-appreciated laughs.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    Funny, even thrilling.
  93. Immensely moving and strikingly original, Kelly's story of a brilliant, disturbed teen (Jake Gyllenhaal) drowning in the cultural morass of the 1980s now feels bloated.
  94. Despite being about a royal family at a critical moment in history, The King's Speech doesn't shout about its many strengths. Rather, it urges you to lean in close, where its intelligence and heart come through loud and clear.
  95. Up
    While their latest achievement can't quite one-up "WALL-E," it offers soaring highs that are bound to enchant viewers of any age.
  96. The result is a film almost too reliant on its players to push it through.
  97. With its agile, clever script and winning characters, Toy Story 2 is that rare thing -- an excellent children's movie with no upper age limit.

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