New York Daily News' Scores

For 6,684 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps
Lowest review score: 0 Everly
Score distribution:
6684 movie reviews
  1. Assayas - whose previous work, though noteworthy, never hinted at this kind of ambition - gives the film a journalistic quality, while admitting that only a recombination of facts and fiction could do the story justice. It certainly results in explosive viewing.
  2. Small victories that turn into defeats, long walks to gain little ground, little wounds that get deeper every day - growing old is a war, and movies rarely go there. Michael Haneke's amazing, dignified Amour is the exception.
  3. Handsome, passionate and fun. It's everything we go to the movies for.
  4. Stone, who wowed on Broadway in “Cabaret,” again shows off some beautiful pipes. She captivates completely from her first frame. Then again, so does La La Land — a singing love letter to musicals, romance and the City of Angels that feels almost like a gift from above.
  5. "Amadeus is about as close to perfection as movies get," I wrote in 1984. Now, it's 20 minutes closer.
  6. An evocative vision of self-destruction, a gorgeously crafted time capsule, and a fantastic showcase for Oscar Isaac in the title role.
  7. Passes like an evening spent with friends.
  8. Take us on an indelible tour through the highest and lowest points of the human experience.
  9. This mercilessly intense movie is definitely not for the faint of heart. The atmosphere remains highly charged from beginning to end. There’s no letup, nary a suggestion of humor to break the tension. The viewer remains as stunned and repelled by the action as the movie’s well-bred narrator, an idealistic young volunteer (played effectively by Charlie Sheen) who naively expects to find himself by sharing the mud with the mostly poor and uneducated grunts.
  10. There is never a shortage of options if you're looking for an intimate foreign drama about family bonds. But the eloquent insights of director Claire Denis stand alone.
  11. Star Wars is somewhat grounded by a malfunctioning script and hopelessly infantile dialogue, but from a technical standpoint, it is an absolutely breathtaking achievement.
  12. Universally appealing story that plays as well now as it did on opening day a half-century ago. Maybe better.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    The movie's Islamists aren't true believers but a bunch of thugs. A madwoman who dismisses them with a blunt word has much greater moral authority.
  13. With a grating symphonic score by ­Radiohead's Jonny Greenwood and the constant sense of danger following Plainview, "Blood" does not release its grip on the audience until its last, bizarrely crazy minutes.
  14. For Hobbitués and adventure fans of all other ages, it's the year's best thrill ride -- maybe the best film.
    • New York Daily News
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    No wonder the vodka bottle beckons in this wrenchingly acted, remorseless modern masterpiece.
  15. While the vocal performances of Hanks, Allen and company make up a perfect ensemble, and its visual leaps astound, TS3's real power sneaks up on you.
  16. It's a deceptively simple tale that tackles, serenely and with surprising humor, issues of gender, power, custom and change.
  17. Don't miss The Fast Runner. If you do, you will deprive yourself of not only one of the most intriguing feature-film projects in decades and enough plain-spoken anthropology for three credits at Harvard, but one of the most flat-out entertaining movies of the year.
    • New York Daily News
  18. An insanely delicious animated feature.
  19. If you've got the patience, this is still one of the all-time exercises in cinematic cool.
  20. In some ways, The Queen is a comedy of manners - bad, good and archaic. The formal bowing and scraping surrounding Her Majesty is as hilarious as it is (apparently) accurate.
  21. The film is a mystery uncovered like a detective story, wrapped in a love letter.
  22. Spielberg's direction and Melissa Mathison's script never lose sight of the realistic, low center of gravity world of childhood, in which such marvelous adventures happen every day that an alien knocking around the garage is not really such an unusual occurrence. [2002 re-release]
  23. "Chocolat" was just a warmup for the stunning display of the male form against National Geographic settings in her new Beau Travail.
    • New York Daily News
  24. This animated documentary, from former Israeli soldier Ari Folman, blends both tactics to devastating effect. Perhaps only animation could give us the distance that makes his subject bearable: the personal cost of his own participation in the 1982 Lebanon War.
  25. If the structure is a tad out of whack, "No Country" does not lack for action or suspense. Some of the scenes of Chigurh's stalking of Moss are nearly unbearably tense. Bring your worry beads.
  26. A fascinating and informative, if sometimes stodgy, documentary about the most secret wing of Israel's anti-espionage unit.
  27. Ida
    Ida is photographed in gorgeous black-and-white cinematography. A deep focus allows every corner of the simple, serene compositions to be seen clearly. The economy of story and dialogue extends to the running time — at barely 90 minutes, the movie feels full, yet free of excess.
  28. The race alone is well worth the price of admission.

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