New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,305 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 My Name Is Earl: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 The Cougar: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 542
  2. Negative: 0 out of 542
542 tv reviews
  1. Fascinating film details history of American unit whose sole objective was to fool Hitler and Nazis by creating fake armies.
  2. Arrested Development often feels like an interwoven series of droll sketch comedies, which means viewers can walk in at almost any time and enjoy the gags.
  3. A solid, nonjudgmental documentary on a man so tortured he almost killed himself, yet gifted with remarkable insight into human behavior, his and ours.
  4. [Holder and Linden are] fascinating to watch as they work around Holder’s lazy partner and strong new characters who include a brilliant psychopath about to be executed.
  5. Rescuing people from burning buildings. Feeding people who are starving. Taking a child no one cared about and teaching that child to read. That’s heroic. The Hero is an entertaining reality show. That’s fine. It’s just not the same thing.
  6. A promising new summer series.
  7. As with “Pretty Little Liars,” the viewer knows no more than the characters. And as with “PLL,” it should be fun finding out.
  8. '24'... isn't a TV show. It's a thrill ride - so intense and fast-paced, it ought to come with guardrails attached. [5 Nov 2001]
    • New York Daily News
  9. About as smart, charming and clever as comedy can get. [25 Sept 2001, p.100]
    • New York Daily News
  10. A Cherry drama rises or falls on the pretty simple test of whether it’s fun, and Devious Maids has the right stuff to get to there.
  11. The new prime-time soap opera "Desperate Housewives" could be described as a guilty pleasure - but there's no reason for guilt. This show is an absolute pleasure - and the most entertaining new show of the fall season. [30 Sep 2004]
    • New York Daily News
  12. If all "South Park" offered were poo-poo jokes and babes spouting profanity, the show would wear thin awfully fast. It doesn't. The reason is that Parker, Stone and their collaborators actually have done something remarkable with their primitive, construction-paper animation: They have created a wholly new, internally consistent fictional world and have peopled it with distinct, interesting characters. [13 Aug 1997]
    • New York Daily News
  13. Charlotte Rampling makes Dr. Evelyn Vogel troubling and vaguely creepy, which probably isn’t what Dexter needs. She also opens up a dialogue on whether a psychopath like Dexter might be part of nature’s deliberate design, the human version of alpha predators. So we’ve got the philosophical and we’ve got the visceral as we count down to the last hours.
  14. Viewers may find it takes some concentration to sort out the lineup and the dramas here. The payoff is worth the investment.
  15. The reality show has become a nightmare, which isn’t a terrible premise. But setting it in the woods and turning the contestants into prey for some malevolent force harks back more to “Friday the 13th” than to “Survivor.” This wouldn’t be as noticeable if Siberia leavened the whole thing with dark humor.
  16. It's still, for the most part, the exact same show, which is a relief: The fun remains watching a pressure-cooker gathering of a bunch of the alleged "best and brightest," and seeing just how quickly they can act with astounding stupidity. [9 Sep 2004]
    • New York Daily News
  17. At times, the show feels almost as dense to viewers as the case feels to the characters. It’s got an inherent intrigue, though, and even before we fully understand the mystery, Kruger has us rooting for Cross to solve it.
  18. A clever, quick and maybe even a little subversive show. [21 Sep 1998]
    • New York Daily News
  19. Being Mary Jane is a film for grownups. A good film for grownups.
  20. Ironically, Griffiths at times may be a little too much actress for her role. But it takes a village to make a Camp, and watching this crew work to save Little Otter and find summer love is far from the worst thing you could do at 10 o’clock on Wednesday night
  21. Orange has graphic scenes that aren’t for kids. But they aren’t played for cheap gags, either, and that attitude serves the production well. With Schilling in top form, this Orange tastes fresh.
  22. For all the familiar elements here, however, nothing feels like a gimmick. It’s a crime-and-cop story with enough time to paint detailed pictures of all the people the murder affects.
  23. They’re wry and smart about each other and sometimes themselves. Everything also comes out funnier because it’s refreshingly underplayed.
  24. The journey has been fascinating, and unlike in some other cop shows, the police part isn’t toss-away boilerplate. While the cases aren’t as complex as the characters, they’ve got layers.
  25. Boardwalk Empire keeps the players moving as its fourth season begins Sunday night, and that’s just one reason it remains must-see television drama.
  26. The notes of triumph become louder and more frequent as PBS’ ambitious six-hour series on America’s fastest-growing minority moves toward its conclusion.
  27. Brooklyn Nine-Nine is the funniest and most satisfying new broadcast sitcom of the season.
  28. The trump card of Hollow Crown, of course, is that it was written by Shakespeare--and if the language sounds stilted to modern ears, anyone who listens for more than a few minutes will be properly seduced.
  29. Things get tense fast in CBS’ new Hostages, and if it can maintain that tension for 13 weeks, the network has a winner.
  30. The Blacklist won’t be the most cerebral show on television. It’s a fast-paced mystery that’s just plain entertaining.
  31. The pilot, which obviously had a big budget, looks almost as sleek as a movie. Creator Joss Whedon promises the show will work hard to stay on that level. It will live or die, however, on whether we want to keep watching its characters. Right up front, the answer is we do.
  32. Whether the film gets all the nuances right is hard for civilians to say. But round for round, the fight is surprisingly lively.
  33. The dramas, rivalries, kindnesses and treacheries begin almost at once, and as in all the best PBS series, they are well-drawn.
  34. It’s a half hour you won’t regret spending.
  35. Without taking anything away from “Once Upon a Time”--this one is cleaner and seems to require less cataloging of multiple plotlines.
  36. It’s lethal and funny. Sometimes the new normal looks much like the old.
  37. Many of the people we meet in the cast are good guys, which gives Dancing a hopeful tone, even when the odds go the other way. We want the folks who deserve it to win, and so does the show.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The movie deals with Lisa’s death tastefully and sincerely, and the three actresses who play the girls couldn’t be better. They have the trio’s finger-snapping repartee and sisterly rapport down. If the script clunks, and the direction of Charles Stone III lacks the slightest in subtlety or grace, those qualities aren’t what matters. The cray-cray back story is.
  38. Watching it, to be blunt, is more work. It’s work well rewarded.
  39. We like the people and the jokes are funny. We know there’s something vulnerable and even poignant behind that barrage of one-liners.
  40. It’s not just a good story, it’s a good story well told.
  41. Lee directs the film in a way that spotlights Tyson’s humor and a degree of articulation that probably still surprises a lot of people.
  42. Goldberg’s documentary doesn’t dwell on the what-ifs. It focuses on what a remarkable woman did accomplish, just by making us laugh.
  43. Justified has reached the point where we know some of its tricks. But thanks to Leonard and Olyphant and writer Graham Yost’s fine balance of humor and mayhem, it’s still an hour worth looking forward to.
  44. Much remains solid at the heart of rich Downton drama, and Fellowes has certainly shown in the past that he can bring it all back home.
  45. Happily, Harrelson and McConaughey play the characters well enough, and the script is crafted ingeniously enough, that we want to know where it all goes next--and don't focus on the likelihood it will be no place good.
  46. Though it’s not the series’ strongest script, the two fine actors can still extract every nuance from it.
  47. With fine supporting players like Anna Chancellor as Fleming’s wartime superior, Second Officer Monday, and Rupert Evans as Ian’s brother Peter, this four-part series makes us care about people whose fate neither we nor they can easily summarize.
  48. Like the Oscars themselves at their best, it’s a celebration of the movies.
  49. Some of Star-Crossed falls into the CW’s well-trod comfort zone: young-adult romantic drama with a sci-fi twist. It shows extra ambition, though, by putting its outsiders so constantly and viscerally close to those who suspect and fear them. Add forbidden love, which can never escape the shadow of potential doom, and Star-Crossed could become both provocative and entertaining.
  50. House of Cards, like “The West Wing,” has soap and melodrama in its DNA. It also moves at a surprisingly deliberate pace, often seeming to linger on a scene just so it won’t clutter itself up by bringing in too many subplots. Still, the second season maintains the tension of the first season, and the “Bad Boys at Work” sign is still up. Let the binging begin.
  51. Late Night lets the host act a little more relaxed, and Meyers uses that freedom well.
  52. The indomitable Ragnar (played with great intensity by Aussie Travis Fimmel) is now an earl and finds that politics can be more treacherous than hand-to-hand combat.
  53. Those Who Kill can be a tough watch, because it has some intense scenes. Fortunately, they aren’t unduly extended, and for those who stick it out, there look to be rewards.
  54. All the actors nail their parts, but Tyson runs the show.
  55. It’s all done with brilliant imagery and crisp production that differs from Sagan’s primarily because the technology just keeps getting better.
  56. Fans of the film will devour the TV series, and nonfans might give it a shot. Just be forewarned that it’s not “Blue Bloods.” It’s more like cold blood.
  57. The story itself relies on a series of coincidences that may be improbable, but the character responses feel authentic.
  58. All of this unfolds at a snail’s pace--at least in this first episode--and for some, that may be a bit of a let-down after last season’s violent conclusion. But that’s fine. This is a series that has already proven its mettle.
  59. It puts a fresh lens on events that shaped America, and in the process it spins a good yarn.
  60. If you liked the movie, approach the TV show without fear.
  61. It’s a complex, multilayered show, with the writing and acting chops to pull it off.
  62. Beyond the joke, the show’s premise is encouraging: that being gay is no big deal.... The engine driving this show is female friendship, the kind strong enough to get you through even high school. For Amy and Karma, we want that.
  63. The reason to watch 24: Live Another Day isn’t for ideology. It’s to get caught up in a fast-paced, high-powered adventure played out by people we care about.
  64. While he starts off a little rusty, the second episode proves he’s kept his edge.
  65. This reincarnation of The Normal Heart raises all the right disturbing questions.
  66. It all adds up to a promising, surprisingly lively and fast-paced drama that humanizes those early computer geeks.
  67. This season also takes a few scenes to get into gear. But it’s faster, and Schilling in particular slides right into her new rhythm as the seasoned prison veteran.
  68. Much of the real beauty of Power lies in the details, conversational and visual.
  69. Like most of the best cable shows, Murder in the First strips the production and the cast down to the essentials, then executes them well.
  70. Chasing Life walks a line itself, staying away from sad, but stopping short of sentimental. Ricci makes the balance work, reminding us that a story of a girl with cancer can also be the story of a girl.
  71. So we’ve got our choice of apocalypses--and for fans of good, solid, action-packed summer TV escapism, that’s good.
  72. The adventure is good, the characters are better than good, and the playful, often insulting repartee is someting you might hear from college buddies on holiday in Cabo. These Musketeers are worth a bite.
  73. This eight-episode series eventually moves to multiple dramas, from some of those gunshot victims to a nurse who loses her job. And thus it remains a “med” show, which is heartening news.
  74. It’s a breath of fresh television air.
  75. It’s worth watching even when it’s not easy.
  76. The Strain dramatizes the book series of the same name and creates a creepy, ominous mood that does it full justice.
  77. Creator Timothy Sexton has woven this story with a master’s touch, making us care about the characters even as we fear for their lives. Or, for that matter, all our lives.
  78. Manhattan dramatizes with a little extra dab of soap, but generally quite engagingly life in the secret World War II compound where the country's most brilliant scientists were tasked with creating a superbomb before the bad guy could.
  79. Writer/director Hugo Blick skillfully walks the hairline between a well-paced adventure thriller and a psychological study that gives us enough time to appreciate the nuances of the character we're watching.
  80. It has woven well-crafted murder dramas and, beyond that, given us wonderfully complex lead characters who go way beyond the light banter, gruff exterior and “will they/won’t they” tease of most TV cop teams.
  81. Despite the overload of information we’ve acquired about Nixon in the years since, the tapes still have the power to jar.
  82. Cinemax originals have mostly been built on testosterone and skin. The Knick gives us a fuller and richer body.
  83. It’s period drama, unfolding at a period pace. It’s Starz, so it’s got some skin. Whether you get hooked probably depends on how you like Claire. It’s hard not to.
  84. [Martin's] got his own troubles, and at least up front they make for some engaging television.
  85. Even if you’ve never wondered how a movie comes about, The Chair makes the process feel almost cinematic.
  86. Much of the film is built on interviews with firefighters, and the conversations feel like conversation between professionals, not like a lecture to a group of outsiders.
  87. The Roosevelts doesn’t whitewash its subjects or make excuses for their missteps. It does admire them greatly, for their courage and vision.
  88. Anyone who loves Batman, naturally, will be watching Gotham, and knowing the Batman world makes the show more fun. But it’s also surprisingly accessible to viewers who just like a good action-packed cop drama with a dry sense of humor. Up front, it looks like a bat-winner.
  89. Madam Secretary starts off solidly, with an engaging performance by Téa Leoni as the secretary of state.
  90. It’s hard to explain why it all works, except it does.
  91. The comedy is sharp enough, but also gentle. We like the characters. We probably even know them. And it never hurts to put the rom back into com.
  92. It's a charming dance, and Gillan and Cho play it with the proper froth.
  93. At the end of each episode, you want to see what will happen in the next one. For a murder mystery, that’s a pretty good start.
  94. Much of A to Z deals in a different kind of action than most recent sitcoms about young singles, where the only goal often seems to be setting up predictable sex jokes. Because of that, A to Z may seem a little less frenetic. In truth, that’s good.
  95. The episode moves along at a good pace, with only a couple of moments when the timing feels a little too coincidental.
  96. If the season turns out to be primarily a complex Middle East thriller, that could still be entertaining. Homeland has just set us up to want more.
  97. So we have solid setups here for tales of love, redemption, friendship and the same championship dreams that made Rocky an American icon.
  98. The Affair looks to be a bit more cerebral than some of Showtime’s other star shows. That makes it no less compelling.
  99. The format is unusual, and the ending of the premiere nicely surprising - but the element that pushes this show into the potential hit category is Neil Patrick Harris.

Top Trailers