New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,419 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The State Within: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 How to Get the Guy: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 590
  2. Negative: 0 out of 590
590 tv reviews
  1. It sounds soapy, but it's all handled well enough, and with enough humor, that we believe it.
  2. A relationship with Julie, which has been percolating for some time, might be just a good cover for Dexter. But it feels more complicated than that, which at the very least reflects good writing and acting.
  3. It all adds up to a dizzying series of cross-plots and so many brief and often odd alliances that some viewers may wonder if they've wandered into "Survivor." On the positive side, it's all done with standard Glee fun, the tongue never far from the cheek, and it's punctuated with upbeat musical numbers.
  4. Happily, Harrelson and McConaughey play the characters well enough, and the script is crafted ingeniously enough, that we want to know where it all goes next--and don't focus on the likelihood it will be no place good.
  5. Orange has graphic scenes that aren’t for kids. But they aren’t played for cheap gags, either, and that attitude serves the production well. With Schilling in top form, this Orange tastes fresh.
  6. Like the Oscars themselves at their best, it’s a celebration of the movies.
  7. It’s absurd. It’s ridiculous. If you’re a fan of low-budget horror movies and you miss it, you will regret it for the rest of your life.
  8. Some viewers won't buy the premise of the Social Security numbers. Its beauty, though, is that you don't have to.
  9. They’re wry and smart about each other and sometimes themselves. Everything also comes out funnier because it’s refreshingly underplayed.
  10. Painful as that journey may be, the show and these actors hit all the notes that make us want to come along.
  11. Spy dramas sometimes get too enamored of their own twists, subplots and dark details, but this one never becomes impenetrable.
  12. The trump card of Hollow Crown, of course, is that it was written by Shakespeare--and if the language sounds stilted to modern ears, anyone who listens for more than a few minutes will be properly seduced.
  13. Much of A to Z deals in a different kind of action than most recent sitcoms about young singles, where the only goal often seems to be setting up predictable sex jokes. Because of that, A to Z may seem a little less frenetic. In truth, that’s good.
  14. The episode moves along at a good pace, with only a couple of moments when the timing feels a little too coincidental.
  15. The Dust Bowl sounds like a dry subject, no cheap pun intended, and Burns works hard to humanize it by talking with some of the now-elderly people who made it through.
  16. It all adds up to plenty of action and suspense, with heroes we like and villains we can boo and hiss. And the fate of the planet at stake. Who says there ain't no cure for the summertime TV blues?
  17. Maybe the best new sitcom of the fall is one of the first.
  18. Wright is a diligent reporter, and his material has been whipped into a smooth script under producers David Simon and Ed Burns.
  19. It’s all done with brilliant imagery and crisp production that differs from Sagan’s primarily because the technology just keeps getting better.
  20. With impressive clips and first-rate commentators like Hamill, Jonathan Schwartz, Terry Teachout and John Lahr, Gibney has explained why, like him or not, Sinatra mattered so much.
  21. After an episode or two, when you sort out the characters and how their lives bang together in the dark, elegant shadows of late-1950s Miami Beach, you'll find rich drama, well written and beautifully styled.
  22. What sets Mozart apart from MTV shows, though, is that here we have a handful of twentysomethings and a lot of older folks, not vice versa. It plays this fresh turf well, on both sides.
  23. The show's long break seems to have rejuvenated its story lines, in which intense, rapid-fire action plays out against the backdrop of a complex, methodical geopolitical chess game.
  24. Alias is so captivating because the actors and the writers make you believe in the characters, the situations and the jeopardy. There's a lot of humor, too, in both the romantic relationship and the James Bond-style spy gadgetry. And there are plenty of surprising turns. [28 Sept 2001, p.149]
    • New York Daily News
  25. The best new cop drama of a TV season that has more police than a presidential motorcade. Blue Bloods doesn't have the best time slot on TV, but it's got some of the strongest characters and performances.
  26. Very often, reality-show participants stop seeming like real people, as if being on TV makes them abstract characters. [Daughter] Bailey's bad moment here makes Downsized feel painfully real.
  27. This reincarnation of The Normal Heart raises all the right disturbing questions.
  28. The result is intelligent if occasionally dense tales that focus on the hardest part of a detective's job, which is trying to outthink someone whose thinking is already, by definition, off-center.
  29. ABC's new FlashForward requires concentration and endurance. It's well worth the investment of both.
  30. It’s just an entertaining story.

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