New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,237 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Damages: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 The Cougar: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 510
  2. Negative: 0 out of 510
510 tv reviews
  1. Hasn't lost one whit of its wit between seasons. [19 Jul 1995]
  2. There's not a shred of a doubt in my mind, however, that Murder One is twice the drama "ER" is and that viewers who climb aboard the latest effort from Steven Bochco and company are in for a hell of a ride. [18 Sept 1995, p.68]
  3. It might be 16 of the best upcoming hours on television.
  4. A fully satisfying and fitting TV finale, and a show that really should be seen. It's acted as well as it's written and directed, which means it's just about perfect. [21 Oct 2004]
  5. It just might be the kids, the ones who grow up too soon in the hard world of "The Wire," who steal opening night.
  6. "The Sopranos" remains a showcase for ferociously distinctive writing, inventive direction and brilliant portrayals of surprisingly, even disturbingly, sympathetic multilayered characters by a perfectly cast group of actors who hold back nothing. [14 Jan 2000]
  7. It's as brilliant, hard-edged and hilarious as ever. [13 Nov 1996]
  8. [The first episodes] offer the thrilling combination of provocative drama, bawdy comedy and ingenious production that has become the show's signature feature. [2 Mar 2001]
  9. With the bar set at Emmy, Homeland has little room to falter. With this return episode, it doesn't.
  10. Like "The Sopranos," Breaking Bad finds nuance and drama within this compromised world, and in the process suggests intriguing and sometimes unsettling parallels to the world in which the rest of us live.
  11. There's enough classic "Sopranos" action -- some of it involving extreme physical violence -- to remind the average person that where the Sopranos are is not where most of us want to go. Yet at the same time, these episodes repeatedly return to the ways in which the Soprano clan, in its desperate, sometimes twisted and sometimes touching way, seeks to embrace family values.
  12. It boldly goes where no man has gone before.
  13. All of this unfolds at a snail’s pace--at least in this first episode--and for some, that may be a bit of a let-down after last season’s violent conclusion. But that’s fine. This is a series that has already proven its mettle.
  14. It's a show about someone trying to figure out life, one little thing at a time, and realizing that sometimes, hey, you can't.
  15. It's dependent almost entirely on characters rather than plot - but, with such recognizable characters, "The Office" works beautifully. [10 Oct 2003]
  16. While he starts off a little rusty, the second episode proves he’s kept his edge.
  17. When you care about everyone in a town like Deadwood, every hot argument, every passionate embrace, every sudden murder is liable to delight, disgust or surprise. Once a week, Deadwood is a phenomenal place to visit - but I wouldn't want to live there. [4 Mar 2005, p.127]
  18. The improv-based exchanges don't even sound showy anymore. The regular cast members, and even such recurring celebrity guests (usually portraying pettier versions of themselves) as Ted Danson and Richard Lewis, have gotten so skilled at this unusual manner of filmmaking that "Curb Your Enthusiasm" feels almost like reality TV. [13 Sep 2002]
  19. Fabulous in every respect.
  20. So while the scripts and characters rival those of any network series (and beat most), and directors such as Clark Johnson (who played Lewis on "Homicide: Life on the Street") do them justice, the players surrounding Chiklis and Pounder are a notch or two less intense and effective. [12 Mar 2002, p.83]
  21. The real skill and appeal of Mad Men remains in its characters.
  22. Watching it, to be blunt, is more work. It’s work well rewarded.
  23. Despite living on pay-cable, Homeland also doesn't feel obliged to create explicit moments just because it can. But it's also possible it's just keeping something in reserve--a lot like its compelling characters.
  24. Olyphant's even a little better this season than last, as he settles further into the Givens skin. He captures the marshal's essential confidence while never giving away one syllable more than he wants to reveal about the hand he's holding. Further enhancing the fun, there's a new crook in town.
  25. For all the familiar elements here, however, nothing feels like a gimmick. It’s a crime-and-cop story with enough time to paint detailed pictures of all the people the murder affects.
  26. The next great "Masterpiece Theater" series has arrived.
  27. This year, once again, Benedict Cumberbatch's modern-day Holmes and his intrepid sidekick Dr. John Watson (Martin Freeman) provide breathtaking non-stop exhilaration.
  28. This HBO special, it must be noted up front, is not for all ages. Like the other best comedians, though, Louis never seems to tack on the graphic subject matter and language simply for shock. His nongraphic bits are also just as funny, like his riff on divorce and parenting.
  29. It's not that we haven't seen the polar regions before. But this special, narrated by Alec Baldwin, puts it all together in a way that makes it feel consistently more intriguing than the nature films you remember from school.
  30. Relentlessly intense and depressing, ferociously written and spectacularly acted. [14 Apr 2000, p.135]

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