New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,370 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Downton Abbey: Season 3
Lowest review score: 0 I've Got A Secret: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 567
  2. Negative: 0 out of 567
567 tv reviews
  1. Treme, created by "Wire" mastermind David Simon, may not ultimately get to the level of those others, because it's going to take a while to sort out the characters and lay down the themes. It also looks to have a deliberate pace, and it doesn't seem to be setting up for a lot of blood-and-guts action, so it may end up attracting a more cerebral crowd.
  2. It plays at its own pace, a little more deliberate than other TV dramas, and its strongest moments are often understated.
  3. But at the true core of this strange and wonderful series - wackiness notwithstanding - are the often strange and, ideally, wonderful relationships among members of a family. [7 Jan 2000]
    • New York Daily News
  4. While many shows that have reached this point in the road have left their creative peak behind, Mad Men shows no such erosion. It still has things it wants to say and it still has the poetry to say them well.
  5. It's a bumpy, wild ride that has all the dark humor, surprising twists and sudden outbursts of violence of a "GoodFellas" or a "Casino" high praise and tough comparisons, but The Sopranos lives up to them. [8 Jan 1999, p.116]
    • New York Daily News
  6. ABC's dense, unblinking and occasionally surreal tale of plane-crash survivors on a strange tropical island moves into its fourth season Thursday with its compass still in good working order.
  7. It's not comfortable. Just compelling.
  8. Top of the Lake doesn’t fully get rolling for a while. Happily, Moss doesn’t let us become disinterested.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In one absurd instant that viewers have to accept pretty much on faith (I did willingly) she abandons the college plans laid out for her by her parents and decides to attend the University of New York (a thinly disguised NYU), where Ben (Scott Speedman) will be. [29 Sept 1998, p.62]
    • New York Daily News
  9. It's a brand new ballgame. It looks to be a winner.
  10. It's so intensely focused on these specific girls and their "Sex and the City" dream, though, that at times it may not resonate as much with a larger audience.
  11. Happily, Harrelson and McConaughey play the characters well enough, and the script is crafted ingeniously enough, that we want to know where it all goes next--and don't focus on the likelihood it will be no place good.
  12. This 10-hour production on World War II in the Pacific is an ambitious, imperfect, intense and often compelling look at combat that gets dirtier and more ragged with each episode.
  13. To say we actually like any of these characters would be stretching it. But we're drawn into their lives, and as it starts its second season, Sons of Anarchy can't be left out of any conversation about the golden age of cable drama.
  14. What the show doesn't say, but wouldn't mind our noticing, is that even today we should be very careful about giving up some part of our freedom because someone tells us it will "solve" some other problem.
  15. All the actors nail their parts, but Tyson runs the show.
  16. It's like three, maybe four sitcoms all squeezed into one, and quite an enjoyable one.
  17. Curb remains an acquired taste. Still, even if you never watched a minute of the previous seven seasons, you can tune in and get some laughs. Guilty and otherwise.
    • New York Daily News
  18. It does a good job of selling an event that by all historical measures should sell itself.
  19. Pushing Daisies is perfect.
  20. Lost is the sort of rare drama that's more fun to experience the less you know about it, so I'll let you experience its twists for yourself. It's spoiling nothing, though, to say that Abrams, as director even more than writer, really delivers some intense television here. [22 Sept 2004, p.94]
    • New York Daily News
  21. It's as funny in some places as it is raw and touching in others. Make an effort to watch this premiere, and add it to your short list of must-see TV. [21 July 2004, p.80]
    • New York Daily News
  22. We watch a relationship develop between Johnson and Masters, played particularly well by Caplan. Yet much of Masters still feels clinical, as if it isn’t sure how to remain faithful to the real-life story and still give the TV drama the sex appeal viewers expect.
  23. The show still occasionally talks about this stuff more than real-life guys probably would. But mostly it lets the action speak for itself. Men of a Certain Age is aging well.
  24. If you liked the movie, approach the TV show without fear.
  25. A viewer who knew nothing of the earlier incarnations could come to this one and find it immediately engaging, like a good modern police buddy-team drama.
  26. About as smart, charming and clever as comedy can get. [25 Sept 2001, p.100]
    • New York Daily News
  27. The truth is that at this point, the complex subplots and nuances of all the backstories make it more satisfying for longtime fans than for recent drop-ins.
  28. State of Play is one of the best dramas about a newspaper since "All the President's Men." [16 Apr 2004, p.131]
    • New York Daily News
  29. The language, the acting, the themes - everything in "Deadwood" is good as gold. In TV entertainment terms, maybe even better.