New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,461 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Sons of Anarchy: Season 6
Lowest review score: 0 I've Got A Secret: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 609
  2. Negative: 0 out of 609
609 tv reviews
  1. It still has the same problem, which is exactly where it can take itself, but the ride remains as delightful as the bright shiny colors with which the show lavishly decorates itself.
  2. Season four continues the good work of past seasons by building on all the trouble Jackie has heaped upon herself.
  3. Goldberg’s documentary doesn’t dwell on the what-ifs. It focuses on what a remarkable woman did accomplish, just by making us laugh.
  4. [Creator Julian Fellowes] never been afraid to have characters we like do things we don't like. That continues in season three, which finds plenty of new ground even as it inevitably begins treading back over some old.
  5. Poehler has great skill at delivering outrageous lines in a droll deadpan. That sets the tone for a cast, including Lowe and Scott, with similar abilities. Too many of the sketches, though, cross that fine but visible line between bemused absurdity and slapstick.
  6. In the extended picture, it looks like season three might be playing a bit more with the larger concept of freedom--through the lens, naturally, of those who don’t have it.
  7. The most inspired aspect of this year's primary plot is that Jack is a man over the edge, not on it. [28 Oct 2002]
    • New York Daily News
  8. Despite soapy moments, it offers a more honest portrayal of contemporary high school life than a "90210."
  9. The restless undertone that has permeated the show from the beginning does not abate as we start the final round of adventures and presumably get some idea where everyone will go after the cameras are turned off.
  10. It’s all done with brilliant imagery and crisp production that differs from Sagan’s primarily because the technology just keeps getting better.
  11. Much of the film is built on interviews with firefighters, and the conversations feel like conversation between professionals, not like a lecture to a group of outsiders.
  12. Like all good sitcom characters, they sometimes drive us nuts. But we fall for them both and would like very much for this long shot to come in.
  13. The new guest cast is uniformly solid....The whole show is now on its own for the first time, since the previous two seasons were adapted from an Israeli series. That series ran for only two years, so this new In Treatment will have to work from scratch. What it has scratched out so far is impressive.
  14. Doubtless there always will be some of the Gen. Patton mentality, that a soldier with no physical wounds must be "yellow" if he or she can't just shake it off. Wartorn argues, powerfully, that blaming the victim is not our finest hour.
  15. The Dust Bowl sounds like a dry subject, no cheap pun intended, and Burns works hard to humanize it by talking with some of the now-elderly people who made it through.
  16. I love the idea of a superhero with a great big heart and a tiny little brain, and I love Patrick Warburton's fearless performance in the title role of this odd new live-action comedy.
  17. As in past seasons, a few moments this year may seem made for TV. But this is a show that's scored way more than it has faltered, and the opening episode suggests that streak will continue.
  18. Writer/director Hugo Blick skillfully walks the hairline between a well-paced adventure thriller and a psychological study that gives us enough time to appreciate the nuances of the character we're watching.
  19. How long they can keep topping their previous screwups while giving us brief, telling glances of their deeply buried Better People may be the show’s biggest challenge. But right now, they’re bad in a good way.
  20. This isn't the best role TV can give Parker, but it'll do for now. [13 Aug 2007]
    • New York Daily News
  21. Fans of the comic book and first-rate psycho-horror may form a large enough audience to make this a hit. Those not in those groups may want to start by taking a deep breath.
  22. It’s the kind of deft touch that makes Rectify, a series with a very measured pace, stay lively enough so we’re willing to wait for something to happen.
  23. Just the beginning scene, which lasts almost six minutes before anyone says a word, will plunge everyone right back into a world where there may be no way out.
  24. Boardwalk Empire loses sight of neither the large nor the small pictures as it moves into season two.
  25. If I sound too enthusiastic about a series that ends up, in the pilot, being a bit too obsessed with special effects, I apologize. The Devil made me do it. Or at least Ray Wise did
  26. [Garbus] captures the epic, almost mythical scope of his talent and thus the tragic height of his fall.
  27. Add strong performances by a dozen major characters, starting with Claire Foy as Little Dorrit, and you've got the kind of production television is often accused of having abandoned.
  28. Burton and Taylor confines itself to the nine months of the tour, and while that’s a wise decision, it does mean we only get allusions to other aspects of their relationship.
  29. "The Nine," starting tomorrow, is the show most people will want to discuss at the office water cooler.
  30. If you loved "The Office" you may have grave doubts that any followup comedy could be as good and as quote-the-dialogue funny. "Extras" is that - another triumph, and a perfect Sunday-night companion piece for "Curb Your Enthusiasm."

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