New York Daily News' Scores

For 6,628 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 6.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The End of the Tour
Lowest review score: 0 Misconduct
Score distribution:
6628 movie reviews
  1. An amazingly self-assured movie, it percolates with themes and ideas, all held together by the gift of the bull's parts.
  2. Perversely funny.
  3. Built from a perfect story-telling collaboration.
  4. Pegg and Wright are armed with an endlessly impressive arsenal of attention grabbers, from witty editing tricks to a wry soundtrack and a joke-packed script that demands multiple viewings.
  5. Works on every level. The humor and language are as crude as an R rating allows, but Carell and Apatow's script is so hip, funny and - yes - innocent that it's never offensive.
  6. A pleasure, chock full of creatively choreographed fight scenes.
  7. Arguably Lumet's best film in 20 years.
  8. Written, acted and directed so intelligently that it stands out from the pack, and is guaranteed to give you the warm glow of holiday movies past -- the kind that celebrated faith in human potential and the value of hard work.
  9. The power of the arts to transcend cultural differences is presumably what moves the German to spare Szpilman, and, perhaps, is the key to Polanski's salvation as well.
  10. Locks in on its self-destructive subjects so precisely, it's almost unbearable to watch.
  11. Ray
    Every once in a while, a performance pops out of a Hollywood movie that is so brilliant and unique to the matching of actor to role that it's impossible to imagine anyone else achieving it.
  12. Exhibiting the same sort of patience as his sensible hero, Philibert has created an extraordinarily humane portrait of a partnership between one adult and his very fortunate charges.
  13. The performances are all terrific, but Gene Hackman is close to a career best as the family patriarch Royal, the most useless man you can't help loving.
  14. A slick, fast-paced production with first-rate performances and an emotional punch you won't soon forget.
  15. The movie is an actors' paradise, and absolutely no one disappoints.
  16. Represents the year's biggest gamble - and it delivers the year's biggest and most ambitious fantasy.
  17. It's not as clever, or as consistently funny, or as well-cast as "Shakespeare in Love," but Richard Eyre's Stage Beauty is the most fun I've had with the Bard since that 1998 Oscar winner.
  18. Riveting update of George Bizet's "Carmen."
  19. Go
    Darkly hilarious.
  20. It's a slice of life, with all the trimmings, and one of the strongest films of the year.
    • New York Daily News
  21. 28 Weeks Later has a stronger story line, equally fine performances, greater tension, enough gore to satisfy the most hard-core zombie fan, and a narrative pace that flings us from the opening scenes to the very last image.
  22. A two-hour, one-joke comedy that never gets old, Stuck on You is the most mature, consistently funny and satisfyingly sweet movie in the rollicking careers of brother filmmakers Bobby and Peter Farrelly.
  23. Except for Hempf, every character is under incredible duress, and the performances are exceptional. With his first feature, an Oscar nominee for foreign-language film, von Donnersmarck has certainly left his mark.
  24. Intimate, deeply affecting family drama.
  25. Dano is a real find in this daunting role about a teenager's identity crisis. The subject of the movie is dicey but ultimately deeply rewarding.
  26. The love and attention Oshii poured into animating Batou's pet basset hound proves that the human instinct dominates even in a movie dependent on technology.
  27. Inordinately clever, sprightly romantic comedy.
  28. Harris convincingly creates one "Pollock" after another over the course of the movie.
  29. Critics are already comparing the two movies and largely agreeing that Tarantino?s story about a psychopathic stuntman who targets women for highway carnage is the best. I disagree.
  30. In making such an appealing movie about characters who are usually swept under the Hollywood rug, Binder does us all a service.
  31. For Hobbitués and adventure fans of all other ages, it's the year's best thrill ride -- maybe the best film.
    • New York Daily News
  32. When it comes to sports movies, there's nothing like the real thing, and there's never been anything quite as real as the documentary Murderball.
  33. This powerful, compact trilogy speaks volumes about women in Iran.
  34. First-time filmmaker Edet Belzberg may be the first person to assign any value to the lives of the homeless Romanian youngsters featured in her harrowing documentary.
    • New York Daily News
  35. A droll gem that celebrates movie love with feeling and deadpan humor.
  36. The sniper's life is a lonely one, full of shallow breathing and delayed gratification. Solitary as it is, Jude Law manages to get a little action in the bunkers of wartime Stalingrad in the ambitious but sometimes inadvertently silly Enemy at the Gates.
  37. This is likely the fastest-moving intentionally funny action movie ever made. It's as if the 21 Bond movies and four "Die Hards" had been distilled to remove their body fat (that is, character development, buildup, rest stops, etc.) and left us with only the killing and the punch lines.
  38. Fascinating, amusing and ultimately disturbing.
  39. This winning documentary about fifth-graders who learn ballroom dancing is one of those movies that make the world a brighter place.
  40. Each man winds up owing the other -- and the enormity of the sacrifices they make on one another's behalf are quite moving and have not been duplicated in the movies since.
  41. If there is any justice in the world, Farnsworth will be remembered at Oscar time.
  42. The darkest, most thrilling entry yet in the movie franchise.
  43. As tawdry as this may seem, Bertolucci is not trying to one-up himself. He was 27 when the student riots occurred and very much a participant in a revolution that was both complex in its implications and naive in much of the behavior. He has caught that perfectly
  44. Based on the true story of the first emperor of unified China, could be downsized and told as an American Western.
  45. Goldfine discover so many fascinating themes within their seemingly narrow subject that anyone with the slightest interest in history or human nature will find it absorbing.
  46. It's as harrowing as moviegoing gets.
  47. The strength of McKay's film is not in identifying a cultural period, but in giving voice to so many great theater people. Their passion is infectious, their stories are priceless and their humor is boundless.
  48. A beautifully rich performance by Meryl Streep, [18 September 1998, p. 57]
    • New York Daily News
  49. As strong on action as it is weak on the interpersonal stuff. If Bond can get a new car for each episode, how about some new pickup lines?
  50. The naturalistic dialogue is a masterful bit of writing, credited to Linklater and his "Sunrise" co-writer Kim Krizan, as well as to the two stars.
  51. Makes hoops look like the sexiest game in town.
  52. "Chocolat" was just a warmup for the stunning display of the male form against National Geographic settings in her new Beau Travail.
    • New York Daily News
  53. Gripping documentary.
  54. I wouldn't recommend the movie to anyone, but if the families of the victims take something positive from it, as their cooperation with Greengrass suggests they do, that's justification enough.
  55. When boy meets girl in Steven Soderbergh's jaunty, sexy Out of Sight, it happens with a bang.
    • New York Daily News
  56. The inexplicably terrifying ending is good for a month's worth of nightmares -- no small thing for a movie in such a saturated field.
  57. Gives moviegoers a funny, observant, evanescent approach to the mysteries of human desire.
  58. Bernie Mac gives surprising wisdom and heart - along with the laughs - to what could have been just another generic baseball comedy.
  59. Linklater's ravishing new movie represents a bold leap into the possibilities of technology.
  60. In this cross between film noir and melodrama, there's lust, need, camp and betrayal.
  61. It's not just a movie about an underdog who fights the odds, it's about following one's heart -- despite the obstacles.
  62. A powerful movie that should win all the year's ensemble acting awards. Pitt has never done better dramatic work, Blanchett is as convincing as always, and - in introducing themselves to American audiences - veteran Mexican actress Barraza and Japan's Kikuchi are revelations.
  63. Man on Fire, with a best-ever Denzel Washington, is the first (nonreligious) sure thing to hit the multiplex this year.
  64. The performance of the movie is Liev Schreiber as Shaw, a man howlingly uncomfortable in his own skin.
  65. The plot is intricate and tight. The preamble is a bit challenging to sort out. But the movie's engine is the relationships and the characters' inner lives, all of it boiling with emotional intensity.
  66. Clever, buoyant and surprisingly human.
  67. The feel-good movie of the summer. And the song this pimp works up, about how hard it is to manage a stable of ho's, is catchy and moving.
  68. For a black comedy whose tangled sequence of events is completely improbable, Pedro Almodóvar's Volver feels absolutely authentic. So, think of everything as metaphor and enjoy one of the year's most delectably twisted treats.
  69. Spider-Man is an almost-perfect extension of the experience of reading comic-book adventures.
    • New York Daily News
  70. No matter which floor you're on, the huge cast is extraordinary, and Altman gives the actors free rein to bring their characters to life despite such close quarters.
  71. A sublimely uplifting movie.
  72. Harris brings into focus a nearly forgotten success story, filling in another blank in the ultimate mosaic of the 20th century's greatest tragedy.
  73. A brilliant if slow-paced movie about one man's unwitting journey into adulthood.
    • New York Daily News
  74. Overwhelmingly powerful.
  75. Whether Adam Sandler can actually act is not actually answered in Paul Thomas Anderson's Punch-Drunk Love. But he's great in it.
  76. A pitch-perfect gem.
    • New York Daily News
  77. It's a sensation - both a milestone in computer-animation and a likely Christmas classic.
  78. Beautifully shot, both in darkened homes and on the misty green Irish landscape by Loach's frequent cinematographer Barry Aykroyd, "Wind" has a you-are-there intensity and intimacy about it that make it nearly overwhelming. But for all its violence and subsequent sadness, it's a movie of extraordinary importance.
  79. Noir has never been this bright.
  80. If you're at all curious about what it feels like to be inside a race car going 200 miles per hour at Daytona International Speedway, I don't think there's a better, quicker or safer way to find out than Simon Wincer's documentary.
  81. But there were few, if any, better performances in 2000 than the one Blanchett gives here, and Raimi's crafty blend of dramatic realism and supernatural knowledge is one of the year's best directing con jobs.
  82. A great divorce movie. It's also one of the canniest comedies ever made about a certain kind of literary pretension.
  83. Life-affirming story of love, kinship and sacrifice.
  84. This quiet yet jolting meditation on love, obsession, loneliness, friendship and fate has the quality to entrance you through a first viewing, and compel you to take its themes and characters home with you for further consideration.
  85. The whole system was sadistic and indefensible, and the church, looking the other way as long as profits rolled in from the laundries, deserves the scorn that Mullan and his fine cast heap on it.
  86. The story is compelling, but Metropolis is such a visual masterpiece, it's easy to get lost within its seemingly endless layers of graphic complexity.
  87. A riveting rock documentary.
  88. One of the most inventive, funny and ultimately tragic coming-of-age movies in years.
    • New York Daily News
  89. Haneke has made a masterly, disturbing movie.
    • New York Daily News
  90. An audacious, snappy visual and emotional feast of dishes both familiar and fresh. It's the first really good movie of 2001.
  91. The action is tightly focused and well-paced.
  92. The same audience that loves "March of the Penguins" will eat up this beautifully told, gorgeously shot story of a grieving boy trying to return his pet cheetah to the wilds of South Africa.
  93. This is Guest's fourth ensemble parody of showbiz subjects, and though his sketch-comedy style and acting troupe are now familiar, this is his most accomplished movie.
  94. The effects in "T3" are spectacular, and the action sequences -- particularly the fights between the good and bad terminators -- are exhilarating.
  95. Feels like an old-fashioned movie in the way it deals with bold sacrifices made in the name of love, while its setting and chary view of the era's political machinations mark it as distinctly modern.
  96. Gently hilarious comedy.
  97. It has the most beautiful ending of any American film in years, a coda of reconciliation and remembrance set in a gentle L.A. rain.
  98. It's a deceptively simple tale that tackles, serenely and with surprising humor, issues of gender, power, custom and change.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Critic Score
    "I write 19th-century stories; they're supposed to affect you emotionally," says Irving, explaining why Tinseltown keeps knocking at his door.
  99. What follows is an extreme case of reverse courtship, which begins at conception and works backward toward getting to know each other, and then moves forward to one of the funniest birthing scenes ever filmed.

Top Trailers