New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,265 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Larry Sanders Show: Season 5
Lowest review score: 0 The Cougar: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 524
  2. Negative: 0 out of 524
524 tv reviews
  1. Hasn't lost one whit of its wit between seasons. [19 Jul 1995]
    • New York Daily News
  2. There's not a shred of a doubt in my mind, however, that Murder One is twice the drama "ER" is and that viewers who climb aboard the latest effort from Steven Bochco and company are in for a hell of a ride. [18 Sept 1995, p.68]
    • New York Daily News
  3. It might be 16 of the best upcoming hours on television.
  4. A fully satisfying and fitting TV finale, and a show that really should be seen. It's acted as well as it's written and directed, which means it's just about perfect. [21 Oct 2004]
    • New York Daily News
  5. It just might be the kids, the ones who grow up too soon in the hard world of "The Wire," who steal opening night.
  6. "The Sopranos" remains a showcase for ferociously distinctive writing, inventive direction and brilliant portrayals of surprisingly, even disturbingly, sympathetic multilayered characters by a perfectly cast group of actors who hold back nothing. [14 Jan 2000]
    • New York Daily News
  7. It's as brilliant, hard-edged and hilarious as ever. [13 Nov 1996]
    • New York Daily News
  8. [The first episodes] offer the thrilling combination of provocative drama, bawdy comedy and ingenious production that has become the show's signature feature. [2 Mar 2001]
    • New York Daily News
  9. With the bar set at Emmy, Homeland has little room to falter. With this return episode, it doesn't.
  10. Like "The Sopranos," Breaking Bad finds nuance and drama within this compromised world, and in the process suggests intriguing and sometimes unsettling parallels to the world in which the rest of us live.
  11. There's enough classic "Sopranos" action -- some of it involving extreme physical violence -- to remind the average person that where the Sopranos are is not where most of us want to go. Yet at the same time, these episodes repeatedly return to the ways in which the Soprano clan, in its desperate, sometimes twisted and sometimes touching way, seeks to embrace family values.
  12. It boldly goes where no man has gone before.
  13. All of this unfolds at a snail’s pace--at least in this first episode--and for some, that may be a bit of a let-down after last season’s violent conclusion. But that’s fine. This is a series that has already proven its mettle.
  14. It's a show about someone trying to figure out life, one little thing at a time, and realizing that sometimes, hey, you can't.
  15. It's dependent almost entirely on characters rather than plot - but, with such recognizable characters, "The Office" works beautifully. [10 Oct 2003]
    • New York Daily News
  16. When you care about everyone in a town like Deadwood, every hot argument, every passionate embrace, every sudden murder is liable to delight, disgust or surprise. Once a week, Deadwood is a phenomenal place to visit - but I wouldn't want to live there. [4 Mar 2005, p.127]
    • New York Daily News
  17. The improv-based exchanges don't even sound showy anymore. The regular cast members, and even such recurring celebrity guests (usually portraying pettier versions of themselves) as Ted Danson and Richard Lewis, have gotten so skilled at this unusual manner of filmmaking that "Curb Your Enthusiasm" feels almost like reality TV. [13 Sep 2002]
    • New York Daily News
  18. While he starts off a little rusty, the second episode proves he’s kept his edge.
  19. Fabulous in every respect.
  20. So while the scripts and characters rival those of any network series (and beat most), and directors such as Clark Johnson (who played Lewis on "Homicide: Life on the Street") do them justice, the players surrounding Chiklis and Pounder are a notch or two less intense and effective. [12 Mar 2002, p.83]
    • New York Daily News
  21. The real skill and appeal of Mad Men remains in its characters.
  22. Watching it, to be blunt, is more work. It’s work well rewarded.
  23. Despite living on pay-cable, Homeland also doesn't feel obliged to create explicit moments just because it can. But it's also possible it's just keeping something in reserve--a lot like its compelling characters.
  24. Olyphant's even a little better this season than last, as he settles further into the Givens skin. He captures the marshal's essential confidence while never giving away one syllable more than he wants to reveal about the hand he's holding. Further enhancing the fun, there's a new crook in town.
  25. For all the familiar elements here, however, nothing feels like a gimmick. It’s a crime-and-cop story with enough time to paint detailed pictures of all the people the murder affects.
  26. The next great "Masterpiece Theater" series has arrived.
  27. This year, once again, Benedict Cumberbatch's modern-day Holmes and his intrepid sidekick Dr. John Watson (Martin Freeman) provide breathtaking non-stop exhilaration.
  28. This HBO special, it must be noted up front, is not for all ages. Like the other best comedians, though, Louis never seems to tack on the graphic subject matter and language simply for shock. His nongraphic bits are also just as funny, like his riff on divorce and parenting.
  29. It's not that we haven't seen the polar regions before. But this special, narrated by Alec Baldwin, puts it all together in a way that makes it feel consistently more intriguing than the nature films you remember from school.
  30. Relentlessly intense and depressing, ferociously written and spectacularly acted. [14 Apr 2000, p.135]
    • New York Daily News
  31. The trump card of Hollow Crown, of course, is that it was written by Shakespeare--and if the language sounds stilted to modern ears, anyone who listens for more than a few minutes will be properly seduced.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Rescue Me is like a roaring five-alarm fire. The moment it seems the blaze is under control - whoosh - the place explodes. And just as quickly, it's under control.
  32. No one in Westeros is going soft, and there is no shortage of intrigue and sly drama that doubtless foreshadows death, destruction and plentiful violence to come.
  33. Hilarious.
  34. This season also takes a few scenes to get into gear. But it’s faster, and Schilling in particular slides right into her new rhythm as the seasoned prison veteran.
  35. Whether you've followed the show to this point or not, you can tune in and savor smart TV drama at its best.
  36. The shadows are deep enough over "Breaking Bad" that it's hard to imagine a ray of hope or light shining through anywhere. But the actors and writers are so good that, like Walt, we'll keep looking for it.
  37. It's a nonlinear way to approach a drama series, but that's what makes it so gripping. [27 Sept 2002, p.134]
    • New York Daily News
  38. Rescue Me is one of the darker dramas on television, and also one of the darker comedies: Its humor is as brittle and brutal as its intense scenes, and, like everything here else, is memorably credible.
  39. Four hours in, living up to past standards no longer is in question. Setting new ones is what's going on here, as "24," partly by cashing in on our knowledge of and commitment to previous seasons and characters, gets off to its best start ever.
  40. By now, what we shouldn't take for granted is how good the performances in "Curb" have gotten to be. [7 Sep 2007]
    • New York Daily News
  41. Tuesday night by plunging its characters deeper into a web of crisscrossing dramas that suggest the law and politics ultimately come down to soap operas. Whether it's true or not, The Good Wife makes the theory entertaining to explore.
  42. The episodes that kick off this last 10-show run don't feel perfect. But they almost always feel intuitively right.
  43. Watching HBO's new Boardwalk Empire is like sitting in your favorite tavern and hearing someone say, "Drinks are on the house." Friends, it doesn't get much better.
  44. It's one of the best new shows from any network this year, and is a total, almost giddy delight from start to finish.
  45. Once you sort out all the teams and players, Game of Thrones falls together like a good Western. But you may need all 167 hours, at least at first, to do the sorting.
  46. FNL didn't get to be the best new show on prime time last season by losing its balance, and tonight's opener has the large cast still making almost all the right moves. [5 Oct 2007, p.147]
    • New York Daily News
  47. Though it’s not the series’ strongest script, the two fine actors can still extract every nuance from it.
  48. If Sunday night's two-hour return episode of Mad Men ended after the first four minutes, it would still put the show in contention to win its fifth straight Emmy as the best drama on television.
  49. Credibility starts to fray when our heroes, or anti-heroes, keep needing miraculous last-second evasions and escapes.
  50. Even if you're confused when tuning in as a first-timer, it's a lot better than not tuning in at all. [4 Nov 2004, p.103]
    • New York Daily News
  51. '24'... isn't a TV show. It's a thrill ride - so intense and fast-paced, it ought to come with guardrails attached. [5 Nov 2001]
    • New York Daily News
  52. Freaks and Geeks is tapping into something primal: adolescents' hunger to begin to understand themselves and their world. Freaks and Geeks is too honest to offer answers. But it affirms the value and the universality of asking the questions. [24 Sept 1999, p.140]
    • New York Daily News
  53. Okay, it gets silly. But silly can be funny, too, and Archer is, as noted, consistently funny.
  54. It plays at its own pace, a little more deliberate than other TV dramas, and its strongest moments are often understated.
  55. But at the true core of this strange and wonderful series - wackiness notwithstanding - are the often strange and, ideally, wonderful relationships among members of a family. [7 Jan 2000]
    • New York Daily News
  56. While many shows that have reached this point in the road have left their creative peak behind, Mad Men shows no such erosion. It still has things it wants to say and it still has the poetry to say them well.
  57. It's a brand new ballgame. It looks to be a winner.
  58. It's a bumpy, wild ride that has all the dark humor, surprising twists and sudden outbursts of violence of a "GoodFellas" or a "Casino" high praise and tough comparisons, but The Sopranos lives up to them. [8 Jan 1999, p.116]
    • New York Daily News
  59. Treme, created by "Wire" mastermind David Simon, may not ultimately get to the level of those others, because it's going to take a while to sort out the characters and lay down the themes. It also looks to have a deliberate pace, and it doesn't seem to be setting up for a lot of blood-and-guts action, so it may end up attracting a more cerebral crowd.
  60. It's not comfortable. Just compelling.
  61. ABC's dense, unblinking and occasionally surreal tale of plane-crash survivors on a strange tropical island moves into its fourth season Thursday with its compass still in good working order.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Critic Score
    In one absurd instant that viewers have to accept pretty much on faith (I did willingly) she abandons the college plans laid out for her by her parents and decides to attend the University of New York (a thinly disguised NYU), where Ben (Scott Speedman) will be. [29 Sept 1998, p.62]
    • New York Daily News
  62. As with the Gervais-Merchant "The Office," the more time you spend with the characters in "Extras," the more you feel their pain as well as laugh at their expense.
  63. It's so intensely focused on these specific girls and their "Sex and the City" dream, though, that at times it may not resonate as much with a larger audience.
  64. It's like three, maybe four sitcoms all squeezed into one, and quite an enjoyable one.
  65. Happily, Harrelson and McConaughey play the characters well enough, and the script is crafted ingeniously enough, that we want to know where it all goes next--and don't focus on the likelihood it will be no place good.
  66. This 10-hour production on World War II in the Pacific is an ambitious, imperfect, intense and often compelling look at combat that gets dirtier and more ragged with each episode.
  67. Lost is the sort of rare drama that's more fun to experience the less you know about it, so I'll let you experience its twists for yourself. It's spoiling nothing, though, to say that Abrams, as director even more than writer, really delivers some intense television here. [22 Sept 2004, p.94]
    • New York Daily News
  68. Top of the Lake doesn’t fully get rolling for a while. Happily, Moss doesn’t let us become disinterested.
  69. All the actors nail their parts, but Tyson runs the show.
  70. What the show doesn't say, but wouldn't mind our noticing, is that even today we should be very careful about giving up some part of our freedom because someone tells us it will "solve" some other problem.
  71. Pushing Daisies is perfect.
  72. It's as funny in some places as it is raw and touching in others. Make an effort to watch this premiere, and add it to your short list of must-see TV. [21 July 2004, p.80]
    • New York Daily News
  73. The show still occasionally talks about this stuff more than real-life guys probably would. But mostly it lets the action speak for itself. Men of a Certain Age is aging well.
  74. To say we actually like any of these characters would be stretching it. But we're drawn into their lives, and as it starts its second season, Sons of Anarchy can't be left out of any conversation about the golden age of cable drama.
  75. It's still not a show for everyone, since 99% of the action is conversation. But it's intelligent conversation, and the problems of the patients, including Weston, are multilayered and compelling.
  76. If you liked the movie, approach the TV show without fear.
  77. It does a good job of selling an event that by all historical measures should sell itself.
  78. We watch a relationship develop between Johnson and Masters, played particularly well by Caplan. Yet much of Masters still feels clinical, as if it isn’t sure how to remain faithful to the real-life story and still give the TV drama the sex appeal viewers expect.
  79. About as smart, charming and clever as comedy can get. [25 Sept 2001, p.100]
    • New York Daily News
  80. A viewer who knew nothing of the earlier incarnations could come to this one and find it immediately engaging, like a good modern police buddy-team drama.
  81. Curb remains an acquired taste. Still, even if you never watched a minute of the previous seven seasons, you can tune in and get some laughs. Guilty and otherwise.
    • New York Daily News
  82. He has always been wrapped a little tight but now he's about to explode, and Chiklis plays it beautifully, making it sound as if he must measure every phrase so that just opening his mouth doesn't release all the frustration in a nuclear blast.
  83. The language, the acting, the themes - everything in "Deadwood" is good as gold. In TV entertainment terms, maybe even better.
  84. For its first three seasons, Rescue Me, starring Denis Leary as a haunted New York firefighter, was one of the funniest dramas on television. This season begins with a slight shift: It's now one of the most dramatic comedies. [13 June 2007, p.75]
    • New York Daily News
  85. This reincarnation of The Normal Heart raises all the right disturbing questions.
  86. The truth is that at this point, the complex subplots and nuances of all the backstories make it more satisfying for longtime fans than for recent drop-ins.
  87. Sondheim comes off as distant and a bit cool here, reluctant to make eye contact and often speaking with a professorial air even when he’s talking about himself. But what most people want in Sondheim isn’t a drinking buddy. It’s a musical composer, and in that he qualifies on all counts.
  88. Bryan Cranston's Walter remains one of the best-played characters on television, and he's surrounded by a strong cast that, knowingly or unknowingly, plays off his desperation.
  89. Weiner’s ability to capture “human” set Mad Men apart at the first beginning and shows no sign of faltering at the second.
  90. A brooding, brilliantly written and crafted cop show. [25 Oct 1996]
    • New York Daily News
  91. Nashville plays as a smartly written and well-appointed soap.
  92. The Killing marks another bull's-eye for AMC in presenting complex, literate, well-crafted television.
  93. Season one set the bar high. Season two clears it.
  94. The show's droll and mostly apolitical humor fits the exaggerated characters well, it's still got a good fast rhythm, and the five major players work well as an ensemble.
  95. The droll office comedy Better Off Ted could have quickly turned into a one-joke bore. Instead, it sails into its second season tonight as one of the best sitcoms on television.
  96. Short scenes [are] designed to suggest we just walked in on random real people. It's a raw look that is, nonetheless, a look. It also, inevitably, says scripted TV drama.
  97. Some of the resulting tech and geek jokes feel accessible to all. With others, we feel like we need a password, and that could limit the long-term appeal of Silicon Valley. But if it only settles in as niche humor, it’s solid there.
  98. While some of their "family values" are perverse and illegal, most are rooted in the same principles embraced by the straightest arrows in town. That's what makes them more than motorcycle thugs and makes their show worth the discomfort it sometimes takes to ride with it.

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