New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,461 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Deadwood: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 How to Get the Guy: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 609
  2. Negative: 0 out of 609
609 tv reviews
  1. The Affair looks to be a bit more cerebral than some of Showtime’s other star shows. That makes it no less compelling.
  2. Weiner’s ability to capture “human” set Mad Men apart at the first beginning and shows no sign of faltering at the second.
  3. It's still not a show for everyone, since 99% of the action is conversation. But it's intelligent conversation, and the problems of the patients, including Weston, are multilayered and compelling.
  4. Survivor’s Remorse becomes simultaneously more uncomfortable and funnier as it launches its second season Saturday. Both those qualities are good.
  5. Sondheim comes off as distant and a bit cool here, reluctant to make eye contact and often speaking with a professorial air even when he’s talking about himself. But what most people want in Sondheim isn’t a drinking buddy. It’s a musical composer, and in that he qualifies on all counts.
  6. It’s not always comfortable or reassuring. It’s just a strong story told by a strong cast.
  7. The Killing marks another bull's-eye for AMC in presenting complex, literate, well-crafted television.
  8. A brooding, brilliantly written and crafted cop show. [25 Oct 1996]
    • New York Daily News
  9. Bryan Cranston's Walter remains one of the best-played characters on television, and he's surrounded by a strong cast that, knowingly or unknowingly, plays off his desperation.
  10. Short scenes [are] designed to suggest we just walked in on random real people. It's a raw look that is, nonetheless, a look. It also, inevitably, says scripted TV drama.
  11. While some of their "family values" are perverse and illegal, most are rooted in the same principles embraced by the straightest arrows in town. That's what makes them more than motorcycle thugs and makes their show worth the discomfort it sometimes takes to ride with it.
  12. The show's droll and mostly apolitical humor fits the exaggerated characters well, it's still got a good fast rhythm, and the five major players work well as an ensemble.
  13. The droll office comedy Better Off Ted could have quickly turned into a one-joke bore. Instead, it sails into its second season tonight as one of the best sitcoms on television.
  14. A strong documentary that examines a sympathetic yet imperfect character while admitting it's impossible to pin down his precise impact on history.
  15. Sleepless in America plays like a meticulously researched horror documentary.
  16. John Maggio traces the Italian-American tale in a loving but clear-headed way.
  17. Some of the resulting tech and geek jokes feel accessible to all. With others, we feel like we need a password, and that could limit the long-term appeal of Silicon Valley. But if it only settles in as niche humor, it’s solid there.
  18. A few things in the first episodes of season five, which kicks off Tuesday night, feel a little disjointed. Denis Leary remains a magnetic lead as New York firefighter Tommy Gavin, and the show still has inspired moments.
  19. Justified has reached the point where we know some of its tricks. But thanks to Leonard and Olyphant and writer Graham Yost’s fine balance of humor and mayhem, it’s still an hour worth looking forward to.
  20. Sorting out the sins and sinners in the final eight episodes of Boardwalk Empire promises to be as intriguing as it will be intense.
  21. It still has the same problem, which is exactly where it can take itself, but the ride remains as delightful as the bright shiny colors with which the show lavishly decorates itself.
  22. Season four continues the good work of past seasons by building on all the trouble Jackie has heaped upon herself.
  23. Goldberg’s documentary doesn’t dwell on the what-ifs. It focuses on what a remarkable woman did accomplish, just by making us laugh.
  24. [Creator Julian Fellowes] never been afraid to have characters we like do things we don't like. That continues in season three, which finds plenty of new ground even as it inevitably begins treading back over some old.
  25. Poehler has great skill at delivering outrageous lines in a droll deadpan. That sets the tone for a cast, including Lowe and Scott, with similar abilities. Too many of the sketches, though, cross that fine but visible line between bemused absurdity and slapstick.
  26. In the extended picture, it looks like season three might be playing a bit more with the larger concept of freedom--through the lens, naturally, of those who don’t have it.
  27. The most inspired aspect of this year's primary plot is that Jack is a man over the edge, not on it. [28 Oct 2002]
    • New York Daily News
  28. Despite soapy moments, it offers a more honest portrayal of contemporary high school life than a "90210."
  29. The restless undertone that has permeated the show from the beginning does not abate as we start the final round of adventures and presumably get some idea where everyone will go after the cameras are turned off.
  30. It’s all done with brilliant imagery and crisp production that differs from Sagan’s primarily because the technology just keeps getting better.
  31. Much of the film is built on interviews with firefighters, and the conversations feel like conversation between professionals, not like a lecture to a group of outsiders.
  32. Like all good sitcom characters, they sometimes drive us nuts. But we fall for them both and would like very much for this long shot to come in.
  33. The new guest cast is uniformly solid....The whole show is now on its own for the first time, since the previous two seasons were adapted from an Israeli series. That series ran for only two years, so this new In Treatment will have to work from scratch. What it has scratched out so far is impressive.
  34. Doubtless there always will be some of the Gen. Patton mentality, that a soldier with no physical wounds must be "yellow" if he or she can't just shake it off. Wartorn argues, powerfully, that blaming the victim is not our finest hour.
  35. The Dust Bowl sounds like a dry subject, no cheap pun intended, and Burns works hard to humanize it by talking with some of the now-elderly people who made it through.
  36. I love the idea of a superhero with a great big heart and a tiny little brain, and I love Patrick Warburton's fearless performance in the title role of this odd new live-action comedy.
  37. As in past seasons, a few moments this year may seem made for TV. But this is a show that's scored way more than it has faltered, and the opening episode suggests that streak will continue.
  38. Writer/director Hugo Blick skillfully walks the hairline between a well-paced adventure thriller and a psychological study that gives us enough time to appreciate the nuances of the character we're watching.
  39. How long they can keep topping their previous screwups while giving us brief, telling glances of their deeply buried Better People may be the show’s biggest challenge. But right now, they’re bad in a good way.
  40. This isn't the best role TV can give Parker, but it'll do for now. [13 Aug 2007]
    • New York Daily News
  41. Fans of the comic book and first-rate psycho-horror may form a large enough audience to make this a hit. Those not in those groups may want to start by taking a deep breath.
  42. It’s the kind of deft touch that makes Rectify, a series with a very measured pace, stay lively enough so we’re willing to wait for something to happen.
  43. Just the beginning scene, which lasts almost six minutes before anyone says a word, will plunge everyone right back into a world where there may be no way out.
  44. Boardwalk Empire loses sight of neither the large nor the small pictures as it moves into season two.
  45. If I sound too enthusiastic about a series that ends up, in the pilot, being a bit too obsessed with special effects, I apologize. The Devil made me do it. Or at least Ray Wise did
  46. [Garbus] captures the epic, almost mythical scope of his talent and thus the tragic height of his fall.
  47. Add strong performances by a dozen major characters, starting with Claire Foy as Little Dorrit, and you've got the kind of production television is often accused of having abandoned.
  48. Burton and Taylor confines itself to the nine months of the tour, and while that’s a wise decision, it does mean we only get allusions to other aspects of their relationship.
  49. "The Nine," starting tomorrow, is the show most people will want to discuss at the office water cooler.
  50. If you loved "The Office" you may have grave doubts that any followup comedy could be as good and as quote-the-dialogue funny. "Extras" is that - another triumph, and a perfect Sunday-night companion piece for "Curb Your Enthusiasm."
  51. The Loving Story is a different kind of 1960s civil rights tale, one that in many ways has a deeper level of warmth.
  52. Because of the short-form length, this Toy Story doesn’t have the barrage of witty asides and pop culture fun that we’ve seen in the movies.
  53. The women are the more critical characters, in any case, and Rashad, McDonald and Lathan give the show all the power it needs for its uncomfortable and frustrating yet in some ways hopeful ride through the life of a black family in 1950s Chicago.
  54. Elizabeth is mercurial, powerful, unpredictable - qualities made real, and a bit frightening, because of the intensity with which Mirren commits to the role.
  55. There are a lot of good laughs here, and they are not the result of Larry David changing anything about the show or his character, who is the show. He'd still trip his mother to get the last seat on the bus.
  56. Some Dexter fans have thought the show meandered around for the last couple of seasons as if it were waiting for something to happen. Now it has.
  57. Damages is a show that has always required a viewer's full attention, and the rewards are there for those who do.
  58. Gilmore Girls occasionally feels a bit too glib for its own good, with pacing sometimes a tad frantic for a one-hour family drama. Those quibbles aside, it's a welcome addition to prime time, and one of the best of this fall's crop of new series. [4 Oct 2000, p.100]
    • New York Daily News
  59. Sons has hit the ground roaring.
  60. No, The Hour is unlikely to remind anyone of "Mad Men." Except that it's superior period drama with a deliberate pace.
  61. Bell's acting, very real and often very raw, is this show's not- so-secret weapon. [22 Sept 2004, p.94]
    • New York Daily News
  62. One thing the witty pilot by Dottie Dartland and Chuck Lorre doesn't do is get the respective in-laws into the same scene but that's bound to happen soon. And when it happens, it's bound to be a real howl. [24 Sept 1997, p.70]
    • New York Daily News
  63. [A] powerful and impressive 40th anniversary retrospective on the Watergate case and the movie it spawned, “All the President’s Men.”
  64. It's nasty, hard-core stuff--a tale well told.
  65. As usual with premiere episodes, it's not until the end that we start to sense which contestants we can ignore and which ones could be around awhile. The pace will quicken once we have a better sense of the lineup.
  66. With this delightful and boldly distinctive new series, the co-creator of "Seinfeld" has managed to accomplish two seemingly impossible things at once: He has given HBO its best sitcom since "The Larry Sanders Show," and given all of television the best sitcom since "Seinfeld." [13 Oct 2000]
    • New York Daily News
  67. Justified doesn't have the bite of "Fire in the Hole," from which the first episode was adapted, but it gets much of the tone--droll, a little weary, frequently tense, sometimes conflicted--never forgetting that at the core, good is challenging evil.
  68. In many ways, Branagh's Wallander slides seamlessly into a long line of screen detectives who think more loudly than they talk.
  69. Wright is a diligent reporter, and his material has been whipped into a smooth script under producers David Simon and Ed Burns.
  70. Get past the language, though, and Deadwood slowly but surely draws you in. Keith Carradine, as Hickok, brings quiet stoicism and strength to a new level; Timothy Olyphant as Seth Bullock, who has hung up his lawman's badge to hang a hardware-store shingle in town, isn't far behind. [18 Mar 2004, p.101]
    • New York Daily News
  71. You don't have to know a thing about "Firefly" to enjoy this fascinating victory dance.
  72. For fans of youth shows, occult shows and action shows, this new, weekly Buffy the Vampire Slayer is the right program at the right time. [10 Mar 1997, p.70]
    • New York Daily News
  73. Brooks makes it fresh, and not just because he comments on clips from "Blazing Saddles" or "Your Show of Shows," the seminal TV show he worked on with Sid Caesar in the early 1950s.
  74. Even by the soap-opera standards of telenovelas, it feels a little much. The pieces at first don’t always mesh smoothly. Rodriguez is terrific, though, and this could be that rare telenovela that assimilates.
  75. While it’s too early to tell for sure, Harmon does seem to have brought back some of the show’s earlier spirit. What he’s not doing is making an overt bid for any new, broader audience.
  76. Whether the people here are fifth-generation circus or they ran away to join it, their lives make for a good tale.
  77. Moguls & Movie Stars has been assembled with obvious care, using a wide range of illustrative material and charming interviews with surviving major characters, descendants and historians.
  78. Fascinating film details history of American unit whose sole objective was to fool Hitler and Nazis by creating fake armies.
  79. The episode moves along at a good pace, with only a couple of moments when the timing feels a little too coincidental.
  80. The Walking Dead may be under new management, but it seems to have kept its rhythm, moving easily between bursts of intense violence and long stretches of psychological sparring.
  81. For the nongeeks among us, watching HBO's sprawling new fantasy drama Game of Thrones is the epic TV version of trying to sort out the Middle East. That doesn't make it a bad show, and certain elements like the production can be savored by all.
  82. It’s not just a good story, it’s a good story well told.
  83. House of Cards, like “The West Wing,” has soap and melodrama in its DNA. It also moves at a surprisingly deliberate pace, often seeming to linger on a scene just so it won’t clutter itself up by bringing in too many subplots. Still, the second season maintains the tension of the first season, and the “Bad Boys at Work” sign is still up. Let the binging begin.
  84. For viewers, most of the jokes still click.
  85. Orange has graphic scenes that aren’t for kids. But they aren’t played for cheap gags, either, and that attitude serves the production well. With Schilling in top form, this Orange tastes fresh.
  86. It’s a complex, multilayered show, with the writing and acting chops to pull it off.
  87. The new prime-time soap opera "Desperate Housewives" could be described as a guilty pleasure - but there's no reason for guilt. This show is an absolute pleasure - and the most entertaining new show of the fall season. [30 Sep 2004]
    • New York Daily News
  88. How fitting, then, that the plastic-surgery drama returns Tuesday for its fifth season by dangerously reinventing itself. Dangerously - and totally successfully.
  89. A look at the first pay cable episode of the iconic kids show reveals that it offers the same mix of fun, education and goofiness that has kept Sesame Street a powerhouse piece of programming for 46 years.
  90. It's unavoidable that True Blood will fall into some of the same dramas as other vampire shows. It's just got sharper teeth.
  91. Unlike most serialized dramas of late... "24" continues to do everything right.
  92. Lights Out isn't always comfortable watching, because it forces people we like to do things we don't like. But if it's sometimes hard to watch, it's harder not to.
  93. After watching five hours of preview tapes, I'm interested to see how The Wire turns out. But without characters to care for, much less root for, I'm not exactly burning with curiosity -- the way I am with most of HBO's other series...When it comes down to The Wire, this show falls short.
    • New York Daily News
  94. You want to like it, because the rough patches stem more from high ambition than from shortcomings.
  95. As with "Mad Men," we all recognize the workplace dynamic here. And as in "Mad Men," it's satisfying to see it dramatized in such a fresh and knowing way.
  96. This TV version not only has a distinct, appealing look, it also retains the radio show's sound and personality.
  97. It still drives you crazy with flashbacks, flash-forwards, fantasies and all manner of other tricks that do help define the show's ambience, but which often interrupt the story as much as they enhance it.
  98. '24' remains one of the most enjoyable dramas on TV. [7 Jan 2005]
    • New York Daily News
  99. Everything but the problems feels increasingly awkward and forced. Well-played as the characters remain, we care less about them, not more.
  100. It's well-paced, it's fun to watch and none of the characters needs to be anywhere near as annoying as, say, Nick Castle.

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