New York Daily News' Scores

For 1,461 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 4.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average TV Show review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The State Within: Season 1
Lowest review score: 0 How to Get the Guy: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Mixed: 0 out of 609
  2. Negative: 0 out of 609
609 tv reviews
  1. The documentary covers, thoroughly and in as balanced a way as possible, the murder of a 15-year-old California middle-school student by a classmate.
  2. It’s a mildly interesting fantasy, but the story has too many holes to feel really compelling.
  3. Watching them through this process turns out to be surprisingly interesting.
  4. Nurse Jackie is delivering quite nicely with the personnel on hand. Among other things, it confirms that the best comedy is often rooted in things that are not funny at all, but make people act in funny ways.
  5. The gimmick sounds dreadful. The series is anything but. It's actually one of the best and smartest new series of the season, and could survive just fine, on its acting and characters, even if the divine-intervention plot were removed. [26 Sept 2003, p.126]
    • New York Daily News
  6. Archer is the rare show that's in love with its own wordplay and good enough that this love becomes endearing rather than annoying.
  7. Boss makes the stories compelling and chilling all over again.
  8. Ingenious. ... It's an inspired, imaginative technique, making the slices of standup routines fit seamlessly into the therapy sessions, which is sort of what standup comedy is, anyway. [26 May 1995]
    • New York Daily News
  9. But far too much of the show - a story about a wealthy hospital patron and her dog, for example - struggles far too obviously to convey a quality of eccentricity that in the end comes across simply as lame...Unless the show finds a way to maintain its quality when Braugher is not on screen, ABC's promos will remain half-true hype.
  10. Whichever the case, or whatever combination of the two, watching these 15 aspiring fashion designers compete for their big break is more fun than a new Victoria's Secret catalogue.
  11. Parker turns in a performance bubbling over with vitality and believability, even when the script itself strains credulity or when individual lines of dialogue slip too much into sitcom punch lines and rhythms.
  12. Manhattan dramatizes with a little extra dab of soap, but generally quite engagingly life in the secret World War II compound where the country's most brilliant scientists were tasked with creating a superbomb before the bad guy could.
  13. These four hours pack as much intensity and darkness as 22 episodes of many other police shows.
  14. This seven-part National Geographic series on the world's great migrations turns out to be riveting--not just beautifully filmed, which you would expect, but bursting with great stories about how diverse creatures have learned to survive in a world where everyone is fighting for the same food, air, turf and water.
  15. Saul picks up plot speed rapidly at the end of the first hour. The beginning, however, is so deliberate it’s almost hypnotic.
  16. So The Closer is still the same fast-paced cop drama. It's just that now we also have the subtext of finding out what road we take to the close.
  17. A relationship with Julie, which has been percolating for some time, might be just a good cover for Dexter. But it feels more complicated than that, which at the very least reflects good writing and acting.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Critic Score
    Writers Kirk Ellis and Michelle Ashford do justice to McCullough's narration, and director Tom Hooper has a straightforward style that gives flesh-and-blood dimension to names from history books. Best of all are two extraordinary performances at the center: Paul Giamatti as Adams and Laura Linney as his wife, Abigail.
  18. Patty returns to the unanswered question that Ellen asked her last season: "Is it worth it?" For viewers, yes, it is.
  19. Too much of Men, despite Romano's skill at observational humor, feels slow and uncomfortably downbeat.
  20. Miramax will release the winner's movie next year. Its value, at this moment, is a question mark, but Project Greenlight is an impressive exclamation mark. [28 Nov 2001, p.101]
    • New York Daily News
  21. Crucial, sometimes hopeful and sometimes worrisome as the larger issues of modern medicine are, Hopkins excels on the human side.
  22. While he can be matter-of-fact, bemused and self-deprecating, he never loses a sense of forcefulness, purpose and pride. As Fishburne obviously understands, the story requires no hand-waving or rhetorical embellishment.
  23. Lost returns Wednesday exactly the way fans like it: utterly, totally, completely incomprehensible to anyone who doesn't know the secret handshake. If you're a fan, however, or if you're willing to really study the one-hour crash catchup course that ABC is airing before the first two new episodes tonight, you'll be rewarded with richly intertwined and well-acted drama.
  24. It's the best high school coaching drama since "The White Shadow," and deserves a chance.
  25. The new musical-comedy drama Glee dresses like "High School Musical" and has the heart of "Porky's." That's a compliment.
  26. It's a premise that requires as much clever dramatic footwork as you might expect, and creator Joe Weisberg, a former CIA agent, handles the challenge.
  27. Any fan of Westerns, or of Duvall, will not be disappointed if this "Trail" is followed.
  28. There are no actual fires involved, and several key scenes are played in near-silence. The emotional intensity, though, rips right through the screen.
  29. Tonight's episode just feels a little too much like the first day of orientation, where we're squinting at nametags, instead of checking out what's for dinner.
  30. Being Mary Jane is a film for grownups. A good film for grownups.
  31. It’s a show rife with bad decisions, though only people who can take several steps back are likely to find the humor. The characters themselves rarely run into much occasion for merriment.
  32. One of this season's most tasty and twisted TV treats.
  33. Lange is fine as the senior Edie, but Barrymore, for reasons not entirely her fault, seems off her game.
  34. It’s funny. It’s also scattered, and in the first episode it doesn’t push envelopes or test edges.
  35. One of the strengths of Narcos is its refusal to paint anyone as purely good or bad.
  36. The indomitable Ragnar (played with great intensity by Aussie Travis Fimmel) is now an earl and finds that politics can be more treacherous than hand-to-hand combat.
  37. It's bold, different and exciting, with a central character and performance that take your breath away.
  38. At times, the show feels almost as dense to viewers as the case feels to the characters. It’s got an inherent intrigue, though, and even before we fully understand the mystery, Kruger has us rooting for Cross to solve it.
  39. The show pays more attention to relationships we care about, hints at a sensible number of new ones that show some promise, and thus doesn't rely on obscure medical mysteries to carry the whole dramatic burden.
  40. A well-crafted documentary directed by Nelson George tracking Johnson's life, from when he landed in Los Angeles, led the Lakers to championship titles, and how upon learning of his diagnosis helped change the world.
  41. This show, and the world it reconstructs, gets much better, and more comfortable, as it goes along.
  42. Book of Negroes, a six-hour Black History Month miniseries, will be fairly compared to "Roots."
  43. The Stones have been better showcased and explained than they are in Crossfire Hurricane. Still, as personalities and musicians, they never fail to provide a good measure of satisfaction.
  44. It makes for an intense two hours.
  45. The notes of triumph become louder and more frequent as PBS’ ambitious six-hour series on America’s fastest-growing minority moves toward its conclusion.
  46. It's a fun ride and Wyle has gotten a little better each time. That's why it's a shame there apparently won't be another.
  47. The gamble is that other characters can hold our interest and move the ball forward while we wait for Carrie and Brody. Mission accomplished.
  48. Empire rules, bigger and badder than ever. If anyone thought Fox's breakout hit was over the top last season, the second-season premiere on Wednesday, Sept. 23, has so much murder and intrigue that it makes what's come before look as tame as C-SPAN.
  49. Just reciting plots can make Southland sound like a soap opera, and in some ways that's what ensemble shows are. But this one is more than that.
  50. Boardwalk Empire keeps the players moving as its fourth season begins Sunday night, and that’s just one reason it remains must-see television drama.
  51. Admit it: You've probably never considered the potential impact of sleep deprivation on a serial killer. Well, the creators of Dexter have, and the results make for highly entertaining television.
  52. Sameer Asad Gardezi and his writing partners have created something very different in Aliens in America--and something very, very funny.
  53. Other complications arise as well, and Laurie is superb in this episode, carrying scenes so strongly that for long stretches the viewer will forget the absence of his regular colleagues entirely.
  54. The ensuing jokes aren't new. The men-turned-women only want to know if this planet has a shopping mall. The men still won't ask for directions. nBut Groening has never relied heavily on subtlety, and his strong suits, like timing and tone, keep things moving.
  55. The game has always been better and more joyous than many of the people who played it. "The Tenth Inning," like its predecessor, makes that point as cleanly as a line-drive single to left-center.
  56. The journey has been fascinating, and unlike in some other cop shows, the police part isn’t toss-away boilerplate. While the cases aren’t as complex as the characters, they’ve got layers.
  57. It all adds up to a dizzying series of cross-plots and so many brief and often odd alliances that some viewers may wonder if they've wandered into "Survivor." On the positive side, it's all done with standard Glee fun, the tongue never far from the cheek, and it's punctuated with upbeat musical numbers.
  58. Watching this show feels like walking around Manhattan, and you don't have to be a dog person to think that's fun.
  59. Life is annoying Nucky Thompson as Boardwalk Empire starts its third season, and that gives this first-rate show just the push-off it needs.
  60. The reason to watch anyway is that it can also be rewarding on levels you rarely find in television drama.
  61. After a 40-minute trip through the strange life of Robert Durst, we have no idea whether he’s a killer or a survivor.
  62. A splendid new addition to pay-cable's stock of dark comedies that keep a human heart beating behind the laughs.
  63. Alias is so captivating because the actors and the writers make you believe in the characters, the situations and the jeopardy. There's a lot of humor, too, in both the romantic relationship and the James Bond-style spy gadgetry. And there are plenty of surprising turns. [28 Sept 2001, p.149]
    • New York Daily News
  64. Unfortunately, the potentially intriguing premise of this new three-part BBC America series, In the Flesh, soon turns into a heavy-handed allegory for how we treat anyone who is different and perceived as threatening.
  65. Despite the overload of information we’ve acquired about Nixon in the years since, the tapes still have the power to jar.
  66. This will be good news to people who enjoy watching train wrecks in which the engineer accelerates as the precipice nears, which is Grace's signature move.
  67. Jenna's buoyancy in a life of constant land mines keeps Awkward fun and refreshing.
  68. While some tension looms throughout Steel Magnolias, it's really more a character drama.
  69. As you would expect from a show entering its 19th season, the acting and the pacing are strong and confident. L&O has always been smart enough to stick with what works.
  70. Matt Groening seems to figure that since we’re now entering the final season for Futurama--again--he might as well let all his random absurdist thoughts out of their cages. That’s not a bad thing.
  71. Wright, who already has won an Emmy for the role, remains one of the best parts of the series, while Underwood’s bottomless appetite for dark dealing keeps Spacey so deliciously detestable you can’t help but keep rooting for the bad guy to win.
  72. The question, of course, is whether the show can sustain its heat and, more importantly, its unique character and remarkable quality in its sophomore season. Tonight's season premiere suggests the answer is yes. [14 Sep 1998]
    • New York Daily News
  73. For every talented performer or performance, there's one that doesn't quite work. For every scene that hits the right comedic or dramatic tone, there's another that tries too hard, tells too much or falls too flat.
  74. A solid, nonjudgmental documentary on a man so tortured he almost killed himself, yet gifted with remarkable insight into human behavior, his and ours.
  75. With talents like Dunham (who created the show, writes, directs and stars) and executive producer Judd Apatow behind the scenes, you’d expect at least more chuckles than you get from this sad return.
  76. The idea that both Lex and Clark have a destiny, and are somewhat uncomfortable with it, is central to Smallville, and is what makes this series start so engaging. [16 Oct 2001, p.98]
    • New York Daily News
  77. This cop series immediately delivers intense, richly interwoven drama that sets it apart both from other recent new shows and from well-established standard police "procedurals."
  78. Even though "Ugly Betty" tends to go for very broad humor when subtlety would serve better, it is easily watchable.
  79. Fox's best comedies are always off-center. Raising Hope forgets to stay there.
  80. One of the triumphs of Boss is that we care as much as he [Tom Kane] does about what kind of Chicago he will leave behind.
  81. The first episode of Angel is exciting and enticing. [5 Oct 1999, p.74]
    • New York Daily News
  82. The law-firm arena is one of TV's oldest and most familiar genres, but Damages enlivens it by defying expectations.
  83. He shuffles onstage more slowly than he used to. But he’s still Cosby the comedian, and to underscore that point, he’s even on the same subject where he left off whenever you last saw him.
  84. The best moments in Wednesday night's chat between Elvis Costello and Elton John, which are good enough to recommend the show for fans of both men, serve up small but sparkling musical pleasures.
  85. Cinemax originals have mostly been built on testosterone and skin. The Knick gives us a fuller and richer body.
  86. [Executive producer Shawn] Ryan's a good juggler, especially when he can work at a cable pace. He likes to take a moment and roll it around in his hands. He's helped by first-rate chemistry between the show's two main dudes, and a uniformly strong supporting cast.
  87. It’s lethal and funny. Sometimes the new normal looks much like the old.
  88. Margulies puts a powerful combination of cold fury, bewilderment and tenacity into Alicia Florrick, the wife of a disgraced Chicago politician in a new series that readily admits it ripped itself from the headlines.
  89. Bessie doesn’t poke into deep psychology. It’s more a snapshot of an impressive, self-made life--with a great soundtrack.
  90. A clever, quick and maybe even a little subversive show. [21 Sep 1998]
    • New York Daily News
  91. While much of the show is driven by the Huangs adapting to a new culture, Fresh Off the Boat finds the amusing parts of that experience without falling back on easy stereotypical jokes.
  92. "Without a Trace," however derivative, is a solid program, and ought to please "CSI" audiences.
  93. At this point, [it's] somewhere between a long shot and a lock.
  94. Everything isn't perfect on Burn Notice. Some of the subplots have to be wrapped up a little neatly. But the interplay of the core group has enough ambivalence and shadows to keep the show intriguing.
  95. Top Chef is a show where you wouldn't mind having almost any of these people fix your dinner. That may sound like a formula for disaster among these types of shows, but in reality, it works out well.
  96. The Alzheimer's Project is hard to watch. It's just not as hard as the disease it examines.
  97. She seems distant and a little wary, like someone who has carefully built a comfortable life and sees no reason to invite a lot of strangers in. Her relationship with us is what she sees and shares. In the end, that seems fair enough.
  98. It's the detection, as well as the detective, that draws you and holds you here. Neither the cases nor the characters are simple - and in both cases, that's a compliment. [16 Nov 2004, p.107]
    • New York Daily News
  99. The film isn’t after “why.” It just wants to say that a lot of physical and circumstantial evidence points to a missile. Toward that goal, it’s on target.

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