New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 1,725 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Let the Fire Burn
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede (First Sequence)
Score distribution:
1,725 movie reviews
  1. There's a timelessness, an immanence to what she (Varda) shows us.
  2. What she (Ullmann) does achieve is a couple of scenes of lacerating power.
  3. The Korean director im Kwon-Taek has made more than 90 films since his first in 1962, and perhaps this explains why his latest, Chunhyang, seems so effortless and masterly. Based on a highly popular eighteenth-century Korean folktale, it's a movie that, stylistically, mixes the traditional with the avant-garde; the narrative may be ritualistic, but there's a let's-try-it-on-for-size friskiness to the filmmaking.
  4. The first full-scale documentary about the history of those years, and it lays out lucidly the involvement of the Communist Party in the young men's defense and the ways in which the trials, against the backdrop of the Depression, replayed the murderous quarrels of the Civil War all over again.
  5. Terence Davies's The House of Mirth is a rigorously elegant adaptation of the Edith Wharton novel, and unlike in some other Davies movies, the rigor here doesn't turn into rigor mortis.... This is dourness of a degree you won't find in Wharton, but in its own shadowed terms the film is a triumph.
  6. It's worth seeing, though, not only for its occasional moments of breathtaking beauty and sadness but also because its very rarity demands it.
  7. The film starts out as a freewheeling farce and turns into a pitch-black burlesque with surprising depths of feeling.
  8. Has a poignant undertone: We may feel we already know in our bones just how suffocating this culture is; but the people who made this movie seem to be discovering each fresh horror for the first time. It's like watching a virgin sacrifice.
  9. There's a new sensibility at work here, wry yet lushly disaffected, and it will be worth watching what Martel does next.
  10. By the end of the movie, the characters are numbed, while the audience is sensitized to the mayhem to an almost unbearable degree.
  11. This time around, though, the Coens' usual arch deliberateness isn't quite as deliberate, and there's an appealing shagginess to some of the episodes and performances.... This is the Coen brothers' most emotionally felt movie, and that's not meant as faint praise.
  12. It's a frisky, funny roundelay starring Stefania Sandrelli, and it features enough shouting and arm-waving to power a windmill.
  13. At times it's plodding and inchoate, but there's certainly nothing else like it in the movies right now, and it has at least one great sequence.
  14. The dramatic arc of Roger Dodger may be banal, but Kidd manages some marvelous moments.
  15. Connery and Zeta-Jones not only look great together, they work well together.
  16. When it comes time for some of the girls to flee, the result is one of the most emotionally satisfying of all prison breaks.
  17. Refreshingly uncategorizable: It’s somewhere between a marital-discord drama and a mystery thriller, but it also has its madcap moments.
  18. Much more kid-oriented than any other computer-animated movie thus far. In other words, it's much more Disneyish. I enjoyed it.
  19. Harrowingly straightforward.
  20. Barrymore pulls off the neatest trick of the year: She makes all this pop schlock matter.
  21. This is not just a musicologist's dream; it's our dream, too.
  22. Bob is a marvelous creation--a faker who is also the genuine article. He’s the perfect hero for a movie about the world as one big scam.
  23. A hushed and powerful piece.
  24. It’s a hyper-aestheticized meditation on the meaning of history, visually astonishing, dramatically stilted. No masterpiece, but quite a feat (and quite effete).
  25. The real passion here is the almost erotic thrill that acting still holds for Moreau.
  26. Haneke is an exploitation filmmaker of the highest gifts. His movies are not to be entered into lightly.
  27. By the end of the film, everybody has been triple- and quadruple- and even quintuple-crossed, but the characters still standing all seem to be very pleased with themselves for a job well done. If only we could figure out what the job was exactly.
  28. Spacious, headlong entertainment.
  29. Trashy and lurid as this movie is, it’s certainly not boring, and it keeps its star in hog heaven throughout.
  30. Although Junge had consulted with a few historians and moviemakers over the years, she had never really unburdened herself, and this 90-minute documentary is a devastating act of personal confession.
  31. The mystery of the artistic process is left mysterious -- as it should be.
  32. On a purely visceral level, Training Day is easily the most exciting movie out there right now, but as a morality tale with anything large on its mind, it's a cop-out.
  33. Field made a thriller about what we are capable of in the name of hatred -- and of love.
  34. Office Space is so enjoyable that you wish it were even better...Once the scheme to bilk Initech is set in motion, the off-kilter humor flattens into a take-this-job-and-shove-it thing, and the ending seems pooped-out.
  35. If you've never experienced a Bollywood musical before, seeing Lagaan will be like watching "Gone With the Wind" without ever having seen a Hollywood movie.
  36. The film becomes cumulatively stranger as it goes along, and it has a lulu of a kicker.
  37. The movie, in a very real sense, is about the privilege, the sexiness, of being a movie star. Certainly it isn't about the heist; never was.
  38. As Jay and Silent Bob, Jason Mewes and Kevin Smith are the perfect comedy team for smart, dirty-minded 15-year-olds, which means just about all of us.
  39. This is no antique show: Faced with an audience, they are still amazingly vital and sometimes amazingly lewd.
  40. Creepily evocative.
  41. Scattershot but rousing documentary.
  42. Still, in its own Saturday-morning-serial kind of way, Attack of the Clones is a commendable example of the sort of movie we once loved and then outgrew. Of course, if it was even better, we wouldn't feel as if we'd outgrown it.
  43. Showcases some of the world’s finest and funniest actors having a high old time. It’s best enjoyed as a kind of traveling music-hall revue.
  44. A marvelous literary thriller that gets at the way books can stay with people forever.
  45. Smashing for much of the way; as a piece of fantasy moviemaking, franchise-style, it beats the bejesus out of "Harry Potter."
  46. An elaborate techno-heist thriller, The Italian Job features some spectacular chase scenes, but for a change, the people doing the chasing are also worth watching.
  47. A startling achievement, but its lack of psychological dimension prevents it from making much human contact with us. It ends where it begins: in a state of shock.
  48. If Nine Queens were a great film, instead of just a very good one, this rottenness would be so pervasive that it would burst the bounds of the plot; it would make us shudder.
  49. Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels is in the scabrous mode, and I like it better than "Trainspotting" -- it doesn't pretend its shenanigans are revolutionary.
  50. The result is perhaps the most elegantly shot, and certainly the most disturbing, of the recent fantasy films.
  51. It elevates female sacrifice into an aesthetic. The movie isn't about suffering, really. It's about how you look when you suffer, how you dress up for it. Style is all.
  52. If all three of the women’s lives had come across with equal weight and artistry, the film, which glides back and forth among them, might have approached the symphonic. But only the Streep section truly inspires the kind of awe and terror that the film as a whole strives for.
  53. Berri is very good at bringing out his characters' emotional contradictions so that we seem to be discovering them right along with Jacques and Laura.
  54. Marvelously funny.
  55. Nolan sustains an arty note of existential dread that probably will work better for noir-steeped film critics and overserious philosophy grad students than for general audiences, but he brings off a few brisk bravura moments.
  56. The law of commerce worked this time around: One terrific thrill ride has begotten another.
  57. The emotional honesty of this movie rescues it from sentimentality. To Be and to Have is about more than a dedicated teacher and his pupils; it’s about how difficult and exhilarating it is to grow into an adult.
  58. It all adds up to a searing portrait of social misery.
  59. Hedges keeps everything in balance: The sadness and frivolity all seem to be part of the same emotional continuum. He’s made a lingeringly poignant little movie.
  60. My kind of Christmas movie--profane, subversive, and swarming with scuzzballs.
  61. The performances are amazing.
  62. Theron breaks through with a ferocious performance--a real career-changer.
  63. Rarely has there been so obscenely precise a depiction of ravaged innocence. This young girl has nothing to live for--and an entire life ahead of her in which to live it.
  64. The hurt and rage flying back and forth have primal power, like Russian-flavored Eugene O'Neill. It's rare for a movie to work as effectively as this one does on such parallel tracks.
  65. The film is saying that, left to their own devices, all men would devolve into a morass of monastic grouches. Kitchen Stories is a prime piece of comic anthropology.
  66. Audiences for this film should have no such qualms: When the camel lolls his jaws at dinnertime, or sways his Bactrian bulk, you may decide you've never seen anything quite so hilarious -- or magnificent.
  67. In Collateral Damages, we are witness to heroism, all right, but it's a heroism unsullied by sentimentality.
  68. For most of Eternal Sunshine, I found myself fighting off Gondry's hyperactive intrusions in order to get at the melancholia at its core. Fortunately, the idea behind this movie is so richly suggestive that it carries you past Gondry's image clutter.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The best movie ever made about a man of God -- which is to say, the most honest and morally the most ambiguous.
  69. It’s a bracing antidote to the usual “Beautiful Mind”–style Hollywoodization of mental illness.
  70. Téchiné gets deep inside the dread and exhilaration of people who have lost their bearings so suddenly they don't even have the luxury of grief.
  71. It's the barbs, and not the inspirationalism, that work best in this movie.
  72. What gives Los Angeles Plays Itself its extraordinary density is the way Andersen transforms a cliché into a metaphysical truth that encompasses far more than L.A.
  73. Terrifying precisely because it doesn't go in for cheesy shock tactics and special effects. (Those sharks are REAL.)
  74. A sense of unease, of incompleteness, is, I think, the appropriate response to this movie. Instead of trying to fill in the blanks, Curran and Gross leave things open and ambiguous. Just like life.
  75. Red Lights is the most ambiguously compelling romance around.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    The movie's acts of violence and betrayal may be familiar, but the filmmakers' obvious contempt for people given over to fanaticism is enormously welcome -- a call for the most elementary kind of sanity.
  76. The film is a deeply felt and beautifully acted hagiography.
  77. By all odds, Tarnation should have been an unwatchable, masochistic morass, but Caouette's love for the broken Renee--which is the true subject of the film--is awe-inspiring.
  78. One of the letdowns of Vera Drake is that once Vera is arrested, we lose her voice.
  79. Closer is marred by some drippy music courtesy of Damien Rice and a small-surprise ending that feels like gimmicky irony. But the film's core idea is compelling.
  80. Operates as stealth art: stately, moving, beautifully acted, and urgently subversive to our own status quo.
  81. Sylvie Testud gives such a ferociously controlled performance that the messy murder seems like a necessary release.
  82. Zhang is working in a popular sentimental mode here, but his connection to the material -- and to us -- is heartfelt and without a trace of condescension. As a filmmaker, he's the opposite of a con artist, and his new movie is a gentle marvel.
  83. Fortunately, it never dips into bathos. These two actors SHOULD be noticed. They've crafted the most ingenious résumé of the year.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    An expertly woven narrative, as nail-bitingly effective as any good Hollywood thriller.
  84. Delightful, insightful documentary.
  85. Reeves has confidently entered his self-parodic period. You’ll enjoy his wry post-Matrix murmurs and squinty stares.
  86. Half-amazing, half-ridiculous, thoroughly exhilarating.
  87. The most blessedly traditional sort of documentary. It follows the twisty, complicated rise and fall of Enron in steady, chronological order, from the mid-eighties to the present.
  88. A cool summer thriller whose laughs don't slow down the suspense.
  89. Gloriously filthy, ramshackle, endearing documentary.
  90. One of the wonderful things about Thumbsucker is that, unlike so many movies in which a character changes in order to propel the plot forward, this one stops to follow up on the consequences of those changes.
  91. I'd like to hear from some women about the sole scene I didn't buy--Bello getting angry, then super-turned-on when she learns about her calm Tom's tough-guy origins--but otherwise, A History of Violence is a remarkably convincing examination of heroism, hero worship, and the seductive allure of villainy.
  92. A sci-fi saga that manages to be at once stirring and screwball, gut-busting and gut-wrenching, and more fun than you had at any bigger-budget movie this past summer.
  93. When superb craftsmanship, discipline, and risk-taking (toning down Diaz and MacLaine; treating Collette as a desirous leading lady) are applied to accessible, even frivolous material, the results can be deeply pleasurable. In Her Shoes isn’t a masterpiece, but it’s the best Saturday-night movie millions of people are going to go to.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 80 Critic Score
    A pitch-perfect farce for the post-Enron era.
  94. I found The Promise pretty hard to resist. A heady blend of swordplay, somersaults, fairy-tale romance, and computer-generated whoosh.
  95. The actors are in a nice place--poking fun at themselves without spilling into travesty. Fogged by self-absorption, Coogan makes you like him most when he's most dislikable; he has a fool's vulnerability.
  96. It's the perfect moment for the ridiculous but riotously enjoyable revolutionary comic-book thriller V for Vendetta-which will doubtless outrage conservatives and unnerve fuddy-duddys but liberate the rest of us with its magisterial irresponsibility.

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