New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 2,185 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 The Avengers
Lowest review score: 0 Enough
Score distribution:
2185 movie reviews
  1. Captain Jean-Luc Picard would be enough for one lifetime, but given that Sir Patrick is now living out an exuberant second adolescence as a Brooklyn hipster and throwing himself into parts like these, it’s time to proclaim him another reason to love New York.
  2. Here’s a movie about the efforts to bring the soldiers stationed at Auschwitz to justice, and it’s strangely light on its feet.
  3. It's a tough, beautifully judged performance (Davis) - it gives this too-soft movie a spine.
  4. Bug
    Has the feverish compression of live theater and the moody expansiveness of film. The mix is insanely powerful.
  5. Penn is terrific in his low-key doggedness.
  6. The problem is that he — unlike most modern sci-fi directors, who throw so much CGI at you that they make miracles cheap — seems peculiarly stingy when it’s time to deliver.
  7. For all its calculation and manipulation, there's a very human movie somewhere within Marigold Hotel. You might just have to wade through a thousand clichés to get to it.
  8. A scantily clad revenge memoir.
  9. Delpy may be starting to channel Woody Allen's directorial skills, but Rock has fully appropriated the Woodman's barbed comic anger.
  10. It’s ironic that Stop-Loss loses its momentum when the characters go on the road. Yet Rasuk--the star of "Raising Victor Vargas"--gives a stunning performance.
  11. An ungainly, intermittently harrowing omnibus filled with moments of piercing sorrow and rage.
  12. The inevitable showdown between these two paragons is something of a fizzle; there's too much over/under-acting going on.
  13. Little turns out well in Rebecca Dreyfus's Stolen, a haunting and expansive documentary.
  14. The film bulldozes any genuine nuance or insight or even emotion in exchange for ready-made plot points and by-the-numbers catharsis.
  15. An outlandishly entertaining mixture of high silliness and high style.
  16. The film becomes an aria of agony--but with a rousingly yucko finish!
  17. Depressing, disgusting, and dated, Edmond is worth braving to experience America’s best-known serious playwright at his most gruesomely undiluted.
  18. It's just a movie about a bunch of guys and gals returning home for their reunion, with the only twist being that it's loaded up with stars and recognizable faces. Unfortunately, that serves to highlight the film's greatest failing, which is that all these big names and faces are given practically nothing to do.
  19. The film is slick when it needs to be raw, tidy when it needs to sprawl, and amorphous when it needs to focus.
  20. Scene after scene rockets past dumb, past camp, past Kabuki, and into the Milky Way of Silly where laws can be made up and discarded as long as what happens gets laughs.
  21. This is the first bad movie that has ever made me call for a sequel - to get it all right.
  22. One reason Oculus feels so talky and monotonous in spite of its tricky syntax is that the space itself isn’t charged with malignancy. And the monster doesn’t compensate — it’s dumb, blockish, inert. The mirror doesn’t have two faces. It barely has one.
  23. The Kings of Summer is far from original, but it’s also far stranger than it seems, in ways both good and bad.
  24. God, I love Plummer's performance - the twiddling fingers, the tipsy sway of the head, the reverberating roar, as well as the pathos of a man who can't stop acting long enough to hear the cry of his own soul.
  25. Tends to settle for easy, homiletic insights. But it also has a collection of first-rate performances by some marvellous actresses.
  26. The movie is moderately enjoyable, but it also makes you feel conned: It offers up a disturbing protagonist and then substitutes cuteness for character.
  27. The To Do List feels fresh and strange and wondrously new. It shouldn’t, but it does.
  28. Taking Sides has a padded-out, stagebound quality that is anything but lyrical. And Szabó, a Hungarian best known for "Mephisto" and "Colonel Redl," is not at his best here.
  29. Neither terrible nor excellent; Hayek, who also co-produced, may have obsessed for years about this project, but the result is a fairly standard this-happened-and-that-happened biopic.
  30. The movie is a noble enterprise, and Downey is stupendous as usual, but Joe Wright's direction is too slick to elicit much feeling.

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