New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 2,412 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 About Elly (2009)
Lowest review score: 0 Funny Games (2008)
Score distribution:
2412 movie reviews
  1. By the end of the film, everybody has been triple- and quadruple- and even quintuple-crossed, but the characters still standing all seem to be very pleased with themselves for a job well done. If only we could figure out what the job was exactly.
  2. It doesn’t always seem to know what it wants to be. But it’s still full of marvels.
  3. The movie has none of the smugness of "­American Beauty": You could dream of living in a world like this.
  4. A hushed and powerful piece.
  5. Before it loses its fizz--maybe two thirds of the way through--Volver offers the headiest pleasures imaginable.
  6. Perhaps a less uplifting ending may have seemed more honest. But Shinkai’s a romantic at heart, and it’s infectious. By the end, you just want these two crazy kids to get together, no matter whose bodies they’re in.
  7. The Host packs a lot into its two tumultuous hours: lyrically disgusting special effects, hair-raising chases, outlandish political satire, and best of all, a dysfunctional-family psychodrama--an odyssey that's like a grisly reworking of "Little Miss Sunshine."
  8. There's a new sensibility at work here, wry yet lushly disaffected, and it will be worth watching what Martel does next.
  9. The Gatekeepers doesn't play like agitprop. The storytelling is strong, the images stark. The camera roams among multiple monitors showing multiple satellite views while an ambient score works on your nerves.
  10. Coppola’s The Beguiled doesn’t have the southern-gothic kick of its predecessor. It’s not a horror movie. Its power is in its undercurrents, in the sense that what we’re seeing isn’t inevitable but a sort of worst-case scenario of genders in opposition. No one is wholly good or bad. Both sides are beguiled.
  11. Sherlock Holmes is totally cool again, which warms my dorky heart.
  12. As the spiritual subtext took over, I couldn’t help but feel that something essential had been lost. The state overwhelms the individual; so, too, by the end, does this beautiful, strange movie.
  13. This is not just a musicologist's dream; it's our dream, too.
  14. A senseless blast.
  15. The film starts out as a freewheeling farce and turns into a pitch-black burlesque with surprising depths of feeling.
  16. Director Dennis Dugan knows his way around shin-whacking slapstick, and Sandler is mesmerizing.
  17. It’s our sense of adventure that matters in the end. We must cultivate confusion and dare to be disoriented.
  18. It's a prizewinning combination, terribly English and totally Hollywood, and Firth is, once more, uncanny: He evokes, in mid-stammer, existential dread.
  19. The ending dispels a lot of the magic, but the silent-movie palette is gorgeous, and the film is worth seeing for the inspired hamming of Paul Giamatti as Vienna's chief inspector, whose plummy tones made me sure I could hear the ghost of James Mason cackling.
  20. The law of commerce worked this time around: One terrific thrill ride has begotten another.
  21. The movie has so much texture that once it gets you, you're good and got.
  22. Even more than his other genre mash-ups, this is a switchback journey through Tarantino’s twisted inner landscape, where cinema and history, misogyny and feminism, sadism and romanticism collide and split and re-bond in bizarre new hybrids. The movie is an ungainly pastiche, yet on some wacked-out Jungian level it’s all of a piece.
  23. A thoroughly charming comedy that bobs on a sea of incongruities.
  24. Sing Street is far more boisterous and certainly funnier than Once, but it remains in a minor key; “finding happiness in sadness,” is how one character puts it.
  25. I hate to damage so fragile a work with overpraise, but, gay or straight, if you don't see yourself in this movie, you need to get a life.
  26. I found the first half-hour a snooze, but once I adjusted to the movie's rhythms, I was completely enraptured. Ferran weaves the love affair into nature, but not in the mystical, sanctified manner of Ang Lee's "Brokeback Mountain."
  27. It’s romantic, tragic, and inexorably strange.
  28. Haneke is an exploitation filmmaker of the highest gifts. His movies are not to be entered into lightly.
  29. The film is, in fact, a cunning exercise in subjectivity and withheld information--and once you accept those parameters, it’s riveting.
  30. After warming up with "The Thin Red Line" and "The New World," Malick has succeeded in fully creating his own film syntax, his own temporal reality, and lo, it is … kind of goofy. But riveting.

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