New York Magazine (Vulture)'s Scores

For 1,726 reviews, this publication has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this publication grades 0.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)
Average Movie review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Melancholia
Lowest review score: 0 Arthur
Score distribution:
1,726 movie reviews
  1. As a result, we get relatively little insight into the other characters as they react to Riddick. Without an unknown force to spark our own imaginations, the result is mostly dead air.
  2. A fair number of people have responded with tears and laughs to Saving Mr. Banks, but I found it interminable.
  3. My daughter wants you to know that the movie is great and that you shouldn’t listen to a hater like me. I envy her belief.
  4. Does anybody really find this crap scary anymore?
  5. Whatever its politics, Gimme Shelter fails on multiple levels.
  6. Eckhart plays Frankenstein’s monster in a monotonous, teeth-gritting mode, as if someone had one gun on him and another on his family.
  7. The problem here isn’t the writer-director’s politics, but his stifling lack of imagination, his complete refusal to even attempt narrative dexterity.
  8. One reason Oculus feels so talky and monotonous in spite of its tricky syntax is that the space itself isn’t charged with malignancy. And the monster doesn’t compensate — it’s dumb, blockish, inert. The mirror doesn’t have two faces. It barely has one.
  9. It should be wilder, funnier, nuttier.
  10. This demonic possession story is at times so lame it makes the last "Paranormal Activity" flick look like a masterpiece.
  11. A weird mix of tired jokes, topicality, and crippling anxiety.
  12. It’s a good family movie the way Hooters is a good family restaurant.
  13. Performance aside, the film never quite manages to figure out what it’s actually about.
  14. Bana is a likable actor, but he doesn’t bring any vulnerability or transparency to the part; it’s hard to tell what he’s thinking, if he’s thinking anything at all. And so, we move from one bleak, bludgeoning setpiece to another. But with each loud noise, the film loses us more and more.
  15. The people who made this movie have either seen too much mayhem -- or they haven't seen any.
  16. Don't go to this movie on a full stomach. Better yet, don't go.
  17. Most movies take a while to slip you into a stupor. All the Pretty Horses makes you groggy right away. Set in 1949, it's a lackadaisical series of vignettes apparently culled from a much longer movie that never made it to the screen. Be thankful for that.
  18. Writer-director Billy Morrissette doesn't have much feeling for satire -- or for Shakespeare. This is a comedy for people who couldn't make it through the CliffsNotes.
  19. Plays out like "Cool Hand Luke" meets "Attica," and it's quite the silliest thing.
  20. If Rock ever comes to his senses, he can host Saturday Night Live and skewer this damp, gag-riddled civics lesson of a movie.
  21. Fred Schepisi, the great Australian director, had the thankless task of trying to turn Jesse Wigutow’s screenplay into something with a pulse, but his finesse is wasted on this steaming heap of dysfunctionalism.
  22. Hollywood movies are once again taking on the job that Andy Griffith–era TV sitcoms used to fill, touting homespun values in Never Land.
  23. John Herzfeld, the writer-director, attacks America's lust for voyeuristic sensationalism by aping the very tactics he decries.
  24. What is the great Gene Hackman doing in the dingbat con-artist comedy Heartbreakers.
  25. Began life as a standard sci-fi horror script before mutating into the unfunny mess it now is.
  26. A heavy dose of movie-colony narcissism posing as warts-and-all honesty.
  27. Stupefyingly lackluster.
  28. There's only one surgery scene, but it's the heart (and kidneys) of Turistas. The rest -- especially the incoherent action -- falls well below the mark set by the last Americans Abroad torture-porn picture, "Hostel."
  29. In a vile-movie competition between Michael Haneke’s "Funny Games" and Vadim Perelman’s The Life Before Her Eyes, Haneke’s film would win--but only because he’s working so much harder to be noxious.
  30. Orgy, hell: The film is like a nightmare in which you're trapped in an arcade with screens on all sides and no eyelids. Based on an elemental but happily streamlined Japanese cartoon (an anime precursor), it's an eyesore, a shambles, with incoherent action and ear-buckling dialogue.

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